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General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: jkmarvin on November 06, 2010, 03:57:51 AM

Title: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: jkmarvin on November 06, 2010, 03:57:51 AM
I am making an old Ale for Christmas.
5 g batch.  Primary 1 week.  Secondary 3 weeks maybe 1 more (Lazy...). 
Using  Lallemands/Danstar Nottingham dry yeast: 1 package.

I have never used this yeast so I don't know if it is still living or not.  Should I dump  in another package when I rack it?

Thanks for the Tips.
Title: Re: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: Malticulous on November 06, 2010, 05:08:11 AM
Adding more yeast will have no ill effects. One gram is all you will need.
Title: Re: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: svejk on November 06, 2010, 05:12:00 AM
Most likely there will be plenty of yeast left in the beer to carbonate the bottles. I would consider repitching if the ABV is high (~8%+) or if it spends more than a month in the secondary.  If you do decide to pitch yeast at bottling, you can rehydrate a packet and put some of the liquified yeast in the bottling bucket - there's no need to add all of it since a whole packet is overkill.
Title: Re: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: troy@uk on November 07, 2010, 09:14:46 AM
Is there any safe way to save the unused portion of the dry yeast for the next batch (say a month)?
Title: Re: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: chezteth on November 07, 2010, 04:05:23 PM
Is there any safe way to save the unused portion of the dry yeast for the next batch (say a month)?

Sometimes I will fold the yeast pack and put a small piece of tape on it to keep it closed.  Then I will put it into a small ziplock bag and put it in the fridge till next time.  This may not be ideal but it seems to work.
Title: Re: re-pitch for bottling?
Post by: Malticulous on November 08, 2010, 03:02:25 AM
I keep a pack of t-58 in a bag in the fridge and it seems to keep on working fine. I just sprinkle it in as the beer racks not bothering to rehydrate. My wife has a container of bread yeast that been in the fringe for over year and the bread still rises.