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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: 1vertical on November 11, 2010, 03:48:23 PM

Title: Salute
Post by: 1vertical on November 11, 2010, 03:48:23 PM
Happy Veterans Day!  This is one holiday I feel I earned...took the day off.  ;D
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: bonjour on November 11, 2010, 03:50:10 PM
Happy Veterans Day!  This is one holiday I feel I earned...took the day off.  ;D
didn't do that. 
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Hokerer on November 11, 2010, 03:53:33 PM
Hmmm, wonder where my head's at...  I saw the subject line and the only thing that popped into my head was Hee-Haw...    Saaaaaaa-lute!!
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: denny on November 11, 2010, 04:02:28 PM
Here's to all of our fine service people everywhere in the world!  Thank you for what you do.

Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Kit B on November 11, 2010, 04:06:56 PM
Thank you Veterans, for protecting my freedom & giving so much.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: bluesman on November 11, 2010, 04:45:16 PM
Happy Veterans Day to all of the men and women who have served in uniform!

Thank you for your service.  :)
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Robert on November 11, 2010, 05:03:05 PM
Here's to all veterans and all those currently serving. Keep your head down little bro and stay safe. 5 months to go!
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: tschmidlin on November 11, 2010, 06:19:22 PM
Here's to all those who've served . . . thank you, and cheers!
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: euge on November 11, 2010, 06:23:40 PM
My gratitude for keeping us free.

Gonna call my old dad- there's not many of the Great Generation left.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: MrNate on November 11, 2010, 07:06:54 PM
Yut.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 11, 2010, 08:43:43 PM
Thanks for all you do and all you've done, vets!!  Raising a pint for ya...
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: tubercle on November 11, 2010, 08:52:44 PM
Thanks Dad.

R.I.P.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: phillamb168 on November 12, 2010, 11:06:33 AM
This is a long post, but I'd like to think that it's worth reading if you have time.

---

I learned this recently, and it's really something to think about when you hear people who knock France as being wimpy "cheese-eating surrender monkeys:"

In World War I, France lost 1,397,800 soldiers during the 1914-18 conflict. They also had 300,000 civilian casualties. Total dead: almost four and a half percent of the population. 4,266,000 military wounded, ten percent of the population. And we all know that "wounded" from WWI often meant surviving injuries whose treatments would severely handicap the soldier.

In every town in France, -every- town, there's a memorial to their men "mort pour la France." In Milly-la-foret, a beautiful town near me known for its mint production, there's a memorial in the local church, with more than 200 names listed. The town had a population of 2,416 just before the war. That's 12 percent of the town, dead. In my town, population 423 during the war, there's a memorial to 30 men. This country suffered losses that could not be imagined by those of us lucky enough to have been born on a completely different side of the world in a very comfortable place from a strategic point of view, losses that affected every single Frenchman. So next time you hear someone talking about how the French are always giving up, remind them of those 1.4 million, whose gave up nothing else but their lives.

Then there's World War II. Vichy overshadows a lot of the bravery that Frenchmen exhibited during the occupation, and before. The street I live on is named after a fighter pilot and Légion d'honneur recipient who died in 1940, Commandant Maurice Arnoux. He first fought in WWI, first in Serbia where, at 19 years old, he was inducted into the Order of the Serbian Army, received the Serbian Cross for "Vertus militaires," and the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. In 1916, he was sent to Verdun and as Sergeant flew at altitudes that sometimes went as low as 20 feet to provide cover for ground forces. On two occasions his plane was hit and the resulting damage forced full-speed emergency landings, from which he emerged miraculously unscathed. His actions at Verdun and elsewhere earned him five citations in the order of the French Army Air Corps, the Médaille Militaire,  and the Légion d'honneur, earned at only 23 years old.

During the space between wars he was promoted several times and finally reached the rank of Commandant. During WWII he took again to aerial engagements, and was wounded on May 10, 1940. After a brief stay in the hospital he returned to the air and on June 6, 1940, after a heroic battle, he was shot down and crashed in a cornfield outside of Angivillers. He left behind a wife, three children, and many friends.

---

In several places near my house you can find plaques commemorating Free French who were killed at the hands of the Nazis. Here's one of them: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=48.51839,2.2625&spn=0.001281,0.004128&z=19&layer=c&cbll=48.51834,2.262387&panoid=RAkgXejiUdIo5VaI4fsfFQ&cbp=12,20.21,,0,8.22
(I'm going over there to get a few baguettes after work, I'll post a better picture then, as well as a translation).

---

And, as an American in France, I'm keenly aware of the role my grandfather and other grandfathers like mine had to play here.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs027.snc4/33696_477683813828_574953828_6795039_4094077_n.jpg)
This is the Paratrooper Memorial at a bridge near Saint Mere Eglise. I drank a Sam Adams near here, in their memory.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v334/32/107/20000538/n20000538_34155126_2180.jpg)
This is a blockhouse at Omaha Beach.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v334/32/107/20000538/n20000538_34155125_1850.jpg)
This is Point du Hoc, which Rangers scaled on D-Day.

(http://philliplamb.com/stemereeglise.jpg)
This is the church in Ste Mere Eglise - if you remember The Longest Day, Red Buttons got caught on the roof of the church during the invasion. That actually happened, and the guy survived. They put this up in honor of him.

(http://philliplamb.com/stemereeglise_2.jpg)
The interior of the church, one of the stained glass windows. This depicts Mary, but I'd like to think that it represents Marianne, the symbol of France, with paratroopers coming to her aid. Makes me a bit teary thinking about it.

(http://philliplamb.com/stemereeglise_3.jpg)
This is another stained glass from the interior, depicting saint michael. At the bottom it says "Ils sont revenus" which means, "They have come back." The reason behind it: on the left, the date 6 June 1944, and on the right, 6 June 1969, 25 years later. It was the first time the paratroopers that liberated the town had come back, and was a powerful moment for the people of the town. FYI Ste Mere Eglise was the first town in France to be liberated on D-Day.

(http://philliplamb.com/cemetary.jpg)
Here's a marker for an unknown soldier's grave, in the American Cemetery near the Normandy beaches.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: tschmidlin on November 12, 2010, 05:36:45 PM
This is a long post, but I'd like to think that it's worth reading if you have time.
Thanks for this Phil.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: bluesman on November 12, 2010, 05:49:37 PM
This is a long post, but I'd like to think that it's worth reading if you have time.

I learned this recently, and it's really something to think about when you hear people who knock France as being wimpy "cheese-eating surrender monkeys:"

In World War I, France lost 1,397,800 soldiers during the 1914-18 conflict. They also had 300,000 civilian casualties. Total dead: almost four and a half percent of the population. 4,266,000 military wounded, ten percent of the population. And we all know that "wounded" from WWI often meant surviving injuries whose treatments would severely handicap the soldier.

Wow... this really does put things into perspective.

Thanks Phil.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 12, 2010, 07:02:10 PM
You're preaching to the choir with me, Phil. Thanks for posting!
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: euge on November 12, 2010, 07:47:01 PM
It's been easy/popular to bash the French, but we as a nation have a long association with them. Quite possibly we would have failed in our revolution without their support. And remember- they gave us our beloved Statue Of Liberty as a gift to commemorate that friendship.

Great post Phil! Not too long. Actually very concise. Thanks.

Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Mikey on November 12, 2010, 09:16:47 PM
I'd rather have a German Division in front of me than a French one behind."

- General George S. Patton
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: phillamb168 on November 12, 2010, 09:47:41 PM
I'd rather have a German Division in front of me than a French one behind."

- General George S. Patton

Patton was also known for telling a shell-shocked (that's PTSD FYI) soldier to stop being such a pussy, effectively. I don't hold much for Patton or his quotes.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: phillamb168 on November 12, 2010, 09:54:15 PM
It's been easy/popular to bash the French, but we as a nation have a long association with them. Quite possibly we would have failed in our revolution without their support. And remember- they gave us our beloved Statue Of Liberty as a gift to commemorate that friendship.

Great post Phil! Not too long. Actually very concise. Thanks.



I was hesitating to post a pic I took of Lafayette's tomb but wasn't sure how to tie t in. When he came to help during the Revolutionary War (and "came to help sounds trite - I believe he came with several thousand men) he said "Nous voilĂ .". After the US army took back Paris, one American soldier was reported to have gone to the tomb and said, "nous revoila" meanng, "And here we are."
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: phillamb168 on November 12, 2010, 09:55:27 PM
Nous voilĂ  means "here we are" - stupid iPhone won't let me type right.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: majorvices on November 12, 2010, 10:42:40 PM
The French also gave us Lois Pastuer - whom all of us grateful.   ;)

On a more serious note: Thanks to all the veterans who have served, in war time or not, to preserve our freedom. I have not served but had a history of family members who have. My uncle, who died in '96, saw a lot of action in vietnam. RIP.
Title: Re: Salute
Post by: Mikey on November 13, 2010, 12:07:40 AM
Salute to all the American Vets. We are forever indebted to you .