Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

General Category => Ingredients => Topic started by: jwaldner on November 12, 2010, 02:40:46 PM

Title: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: jwaldner on November 12, 2010, 02:40:46 PM
I'm fairly new to all grain brewing and recently I was in my local homebrew shop who sadly was going out of business. In an impulsive moment I bought a 50lb bag of 6-Row malt because it was on-sale and seemed like such a great deal. After having it for a few weeks I just can't seem to find a practical use for this much 6-Row malt.

I've read that this type of malt is manily used when a large amount of adjuncts are used in the mash but I typically don't brew with a large amount of adjuncts. In addition, I've read that it will impart a grainy taste of which I'm not sure what style of beer would this fit and it's supposed to have considerably less of a yield. I've also looked through quite a few recipes and clone recipes and don't even see 6-Row called for at all. Does anyone have any recommendations on how I can use this malt effectively?

Cheers!
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: richardt on November 12, 2010, 02:46:02 PM
Why not a good Clasic American Pilsner (CAP) or a Munich Helles?  I would avoid too fine of a crush, and use a protein rest.  I assume you have your own grain mill since your LHBS is closing down.  It is the right time of year to brew lagers.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: hamiltont on November 12, 2010, 02:51:32 PM
Six-row is used primarily in American Lagers & the Classic American Pilsner.  You'll need a way to keep your fermentation around 50F and lager them around 34F to brew a Lager/Pilsner.   Cheers!!!
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: gordonstrong on November 12, 2010, 02:57:08 PM
Off the top of my head,
Classic American Pilsner
Irish Stout
Oatmeal Stout
Standard American Lager
Cream Ale

all use a lot of unmalted adjuncts, so could benefit from 6-row.  You might also check the style guidelines for any styles that discuss a grainy malt flavor.

But judge for yourself.  Do a test batch, making something like an American Pale Ale or a Brown Porter (something simple), and use the 6-row as your base malt.  See if you find it objectionable.  You might try a step mash with some lower temperature rests, like in the 122-131 F range (50-55 C).  Maybe even revisit some of George Fix's favorite mash schedules (40-60-70, 50-60-70, 40-50-60-70).

It's a lot to try to learn if you're new to all-grain, but if you take the time to evaluate the differences you get from the same grain treated different ways, you might get some valuable insight that you can use throughout your brewing career.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: Steve on November 12, 2010, 03:16:37 PM
It's a lot to try to learn if you're new to all-grain, but if you take the time to evaluate the differences you get from the same grain treated different ways, you might get some valuable insight that you can use throughout your brewing career.

Isn't 6-row good for a decoction mash?
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: ipaguy on November 12, 2010, 03:24:09 PM
I find 6-row pretty handy when using a lot of adjuncts or under-modified malts.  There are several things you can do to minimize some of the negatives of 6-row.  +1 on the protein rest.  I've done as much as an hour at 122F.  Use Irish moss at 15 - 20 min. left to go in boil.  You may want to use polyclar 2 or 3 days before bottling/kegging.  Doing all of these is probably even over-kill for preventing haze.  The polyclar will probably also have the benefit of reducing tannin bitterness.  To deal with potential tannin bitterness, be sure that you don't over-sparge, and don't use sparge water that's too hot.  If you want to be really OCD, you might want to check your sparge water pH, and maybe acidify with a little phosphoric acid.  
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: gordonstrong on November 12, 2010, 03:36:36 PM
Quote
Isn't 6-row good for a decoction mash?

Never tried it.  OP said he was new to all-grain, so I didn't want to suggest something that complicated.  I like decoctions, so I wouldn't really see any problem with it.  You get more color and flavor development.  You just need to match it with whatever style you're making.

+1 on doing whatever you can to reduce haze, and to avoid tannin extraction (don't overcrush, don't over-sparge, keep sparge pH below 6).  Good advice any time, but very important here.

Actually, if you want the best malt flavor, go no sparge.  You have to crank up your grain bill by 30-40%, but on the plus side, it will help you go through that sack of malt faster.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: hopfenundmalz on November 12, 2010, 03:46:02 PM
The usual styles have been mentioned.

Try this one.  It is on my list to brew.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4462.0

Or try it in a APA.  A friend won a Gold at the NHC in Denver with 6 row as the base malt.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: EHall on November 12, 2010, 06:39:30 PM
buy a 50# sack of 2row and mix them 50/50 until gone...
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: ipaguy on November 12, 2010, 06:48:39 PM
+1 on Gordon's suggestion for oatmeal stout.  The high enzymes and high husk material of the 6-row is a real plus for getting good starch conversion and preventing stuck sparge.  I've had good luck with 6-row and oat flakes with no need for rice husks.  Another possibility is Rye PA, for similar reasons.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: hopfenundmalz on November 12, 2010, 10:18:55 PM
+1 on Gordon's suggestion for oatmeal stout.  The high enzymes and high husk material of the 6-row is a real plus for getting good starch conversion and preventing stuck sparge.  I've had good luck with 6-row and oat flakes with no need for rice husks.  Another possibility is Rye PA, for similar reasons.

The husk material will help with the sparge.  The malted rye has plenty of enzymes (around 100 lintner), and will convert just fine, it will even convert itself, but sparging 100% rye makes me shudder.

I might have to try some 6 row in the next Rye beer.  I also have a 50 lb. bag for a CAP, Ballantines IPA, and now a Rye beer.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: tubercle on November 13, 2010, 12:46:35 AM
...I'm not sure what style of beer would this fit...

 Your style.

 Just because its not printed in a book don't mean you can't brew it ;D
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: jwaldner on November 13, 2010, 08:16:07 PM
Thanks everyone for your inputs,

With the holidays around the corner my wife and I decided to throw caution into the wind or some 6-Row and make a Christmas beer!

If it doesn't turn out I'll let you know.

Thanks again and cheers!
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: jeffy on November 13, 2010, 08:42:21 PM
Thanks everyone for your inputs,

With the holidays around the corner my wife and I decided to throw caution into the wind or some 6-Row and make a Christmas beer!

If it doesn't turn out I'll let you know.

Thanks again and cheers!
Heck, you could let us know even if it does turn out.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: Malticulous on November 13, 2010, 09:34:41 PM
I like it's grainy flavor in wheat beers and it has the added benefit of more husk.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: ipaguy on November 14, 2010, 02:18:29 PM
I like it's grainy flavor in wheat beers and it has the added benefit of more husk.
Good point here.  The tannin flavor is only a defect if YOU don't like it in the beer you're brewing.  IIRC, some Belgian beers are sparged pretty hot to extract a lot of tannin flavor.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: Malticulous on November 14, 2010, 02:50:08 PM
Tannin is not how I would describe it.

When using six row you have to use more of it. The extract is lower than two row mostly due to higher protein.

CAP is the only beer I use a high percentage of it in. I do like to use 20-30% in cream ales and wheat beers mixed in with Pilsner.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: bonjour on November 14, 2010, 03:19:41 PM
Here is a good writeup on the differences between 2 and 6 row malts
http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Malting101/The_Row_Less_Traveled.htm (http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Malting101/The_Row_Less_Traveled.htm)
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: jwaldner on November 14, 2010, 06:07:17 PM
Tannin is not how I would describe it.

When using six row you have to use more of it. The extract is lower than two row mostly due to higher protein.

CAP is the only beer I use a high percentage of it in. I do like to use 20-30% in cream ales and wheat beers mixed in with Pilsner.

You're right on stepping it up. We had to add an additional 1.75lbs to still hit our target gravity on same recipe we developed with 2-Row.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: malzig on November 15, 2010, 12:44:40 PM
A few years ago, I unintentionally made a run of beers with about 20-50% 6-row, when I bought the wrong grain.  I found the flavor distinctive and not necessarily unpleasant.  If I really wanted to try to work with that flavor, I think I would consider recipes in the Nut Brown Ale - Porter - Stout range.  I can imagine that grainy flavor working in something like that, probably not going to be to-style, but could be tasty.  It certainly would give your beer a unique character.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: skyler on November 15, 2010, 09:14:31 PM
I think a base of 50/50 6-row and munich could produce a decent amber ale or American brown (with specialty grains added). IMO, the grainy flavor would pair nicely with the sweetness of the munich for a sweeter beer, and the extra diastatic oomph will keep you from worrying about converting the specialty grains.
Title: Re: Impulsive 6-Row Moment
Post by: tygo on November 16, 2010, 03:55:46 AM
I'm thinking of picking up a sack of 6 row.  I'm planning on refining my CAP recipe in the coming year so I'll be going through some.