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General Category => Beer Recipes => Topic started by: jamminbrew on February 07, 2011, 04:56:15 AM

Title: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 07, 2011, 04:56:15 AM
This will be my first attempt at an all-grain brew.  I invite all comments, suggestions, and criticisms.  This is the recipe I developed after a ton of research, and reading through several books and articles.

Ben's Bass-ic Belgian   (I'm a bass player too)
8    lbs  2-row american pale
3    lbs belgian pilsner
1.5 lbs munich
1.5 lbs caravienna
1.5 lbs belgian candi sugar (syrup if possible)
.5   lb clover honey

1.5 oz. Styrian goldings    60 min
1/2 oz  Tettnang               10 min
1/2 oz  Tettnang                2  min

1/2 tsp irish moss             10 min
1/4 tsp yeast nutrient        10 min
1    tsp gypsum  (to adjust my tap water to profile I like)

WLP 500  on a starter

Single step infusion mash  12qt water, 152 degrees for 30-60 minutes, depending on conversion  (I'll test this with iodine)
Batch sparge with 5 gallons 170 degrees

Est. OG  1.090                                      Est SRM  12-15
Est. FG  1.015-1.020                             Est IBU's   28.5

I know most Belgian beers use pilsner as the base malt, but I like the flavor profile of the 2-row.
Thanks!
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: oscarvan on February 07, 2011, 07:30:26 AM
As the noob the only thing I see is that you have 12 qts of water for a 13 pound mash, which sounds pretty dry...Then a 20 qt sparge. If it were I, I wold go more the other way around.... Extra water to begin with to account for absorption in all that grain and a nice easy loose mash so you can stir it and get all the clums loose, then the last 3 gallons for the sparge. Also, a possible 30 minutes sounds pretty short. Nothing I have read goes for less than 60, most for 90.

I could be wrong.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: dbeechum on February 07, 2011, 07:52:36 AM
Recipe wise, I know you said you love the taste of two row, but trust me - ditch it. Go all Belgie/German Pils

I would also kill the munich. Keep the Cara or sub with aromatic/biscuit. I'm also inclined to think the honey's an additional distraction.

To give you an idea, this is a recipe from a friend of mine and it is truly, truly awesome:

http://archive.maltosefalcons.com/recipes/20030903.php
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 07, 2011, 04:14:07 PM
Thanks guys, I appreciate the advise. Dbeechum-  I think I might do a side-by-side test batch with the 2-row, and without, to see which I like better.  (After all, I brew for me! ;D )   Oscar- The advise about the water is great, I would have had to find that out the hard way.  Thanks again for the input.  I'm really learning a lot here.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 07, 2011, 04:48:39 PM
In general, a tripel is just pils malt and sugar.  You want to have a very low FG, so I'd lose the Munich and caravienne (or cut the caravienne back to 1/2 lb. or less).  Mash at 148 for 90 min. for a very fermentable wort.  Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: tygo on February 07, 2011, 05:09:22 PM
Mash at 2148 for 90 min. for a very fermentable wort. 

Just as a follow up if you want to try that mash schedule you'll need access to a blast furnace.  Make sure you have a very sturdy kettle.  ;D
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 07, 2011, 05:15:27 PM
Mash at 2148 for 90 min. for a very fermentable wort.  

Just as a follow up if you want to try that mash schedule you'll need access to a blast furnace.  Make sure you have a very sturdy kettle.  ;D
Will Tungsten/carbide combined with depleted uranium work?   I have one lying around somewhere! :D
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: EHall on February 07, 2011, 05:44:38 PM
On a side note, I saw the comment about 'stirring the clumps loose'... I find that if I add the water first then slowly stir in the grain, I don't have to stir much if any clumps loose...
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 07, 2011, 05:49:25 PM
Mash at 2148 for 90 min. for a very fermentable wort. 

Just as a follow up if you want to try that mash schedule you'll need access to a blast furnace.  Make sure you have a very sturdy kettle.  ;D

 :-[  correction made!
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 07, 2011, 05:49:58 PM
On a side note, I saw the comment about 'stirring the clumps loose'... I find that if I add the water first then slowly stir in the grain, I don't have to stir much if any clumps loose...

same here
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 07, 2011, 05:58:21 PM
 Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
What is the difference between the two, and why don't the belgian brewers use table sugar over the candi sugar?
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: morticaixavier on February 07, 2011, 06:05:09 PM
 Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
What is the difference between the two, and why don't the belgian brewers use table sugar over the candi sugar?

Tradition

**EDIT** Also the candi sugar is, i beleive, invert which has some slightly different sugar profiles. There is a thread on here about making your own invert sugar that discusses it a little more in depth
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 07, 2011, 06:24:55 PM
 Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
What is the difference between the two, and why don't the belgian brewers use table sugar over the candi sugar?

Actually, the do use regular sugar.  Belgian brewers do not use candi rocks.  Get a copy of "Brew Like a Monk" by Stan Hieronymous (BTW, he's the upcoming expert in Ask the Experts") and see for yourself.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 07, 2011, 06:27:47 PM
 Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
What is the difference between the two, and why don't the belgian brewers use table sugar over the candi sugar?

Tradition

**EDIT** Also the candi sugar is, i beleive, invert which has some slightly different sugar profiles. There is a thread on here about making your own invert sugar that discusses it a little more in depth

Candi rocks are not inverted.  Invert sugars do not solidify.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: punatic on February 07, 2011, 06:30:17 PM
 Forget the candi sugar and use table sugar.
What is the difference between the two, and why don't the belgian brewers use table sugar over the candi sugar?

Tradition

**EDIT** Also the candi sugar is, i beleive, invert which has some slightly different sugar profiles. There is a thread on here about making your own invert sugar that discusses it a little more in depth

Candi rocks are not inverted.  Invert sugars do not solidify.

Tell the bees that.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: majorvices on February 07, 2011, 10:08:43 PM
I brew a lot of tripels (I brew them weekly now) and IME simple is definitely better (pils and sugar is all you need), keep a long, low mash temp (I dough in at 148 for about 90 minutes) and there's simply no need to use anything but regular table sugar (the "inverted sugar" thing looks great as a theory but there is simply no real world "working evidence" to back it up as being needed IME). I get about 90% attenuation on a 1.077 tripel with 20% cane sugar and WLP500.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jeffy on February 07, 2011, 10:24:36 PM
I brew a lot of tripels (I brew them weekly now) and IME simple is definitely better (pils and sugar is all you need), keep a long, low mash temp (I dough in at 148 for about 90 minutes) and there's simply no need to use anything but regular table sugar (the "inverted sugar" thing looks great as a theory but there is simply no real world "working evidence" to back it up as being needed IME). I get about 90% attenuation on a 1.077 tripel with 20% cane sugar and WLP500.

Did you ever use WY 1388 Belgian Strong?  I split my recent batch half with this yeast (brewed almost exactly like yours, but I put the sugar in after the bulk of the primary had finished) and find this pretty "interesting."  Really floral nose, nice and dry.  Way too strong to drink a lot of it.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: majorvices on February 08, 2011, 02:08:32 AM
I may have.. But I am not at the luxury of using more than a couple strains in my brewery and since I use the WLP500 in my White I use it in my Tripel as well. Have to admit, might not be my "absolute favorite" but I do really enjoy the tripel it makes.

That's one of the luxuries of homebrewing I miss: being able to use any strain you want.

Edit: Actually, looking at the yeast chart of Mr. Malty I have not used that strain. I am not as familiar with the WY #s. (I mainly use WL) I have used the 3787 (or WL equivalent) and like that very well.
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 08, 2011, 04:43:08 PM
3787 is my all time fave yeast for a tripel.  1388 is a nice yeast, but IMO, a bit too clean for a tripel. 
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 08, 2011, 05:21:31 PM
Thanks again for all the advice and suggestions I've gotten here.  I'm in awe of the knowledge and experience you all have,and am greatful for the medium which allows you to share that with a noob like me.  I am going to tweak this recipe a bit, and if you are intersted, will let you know the final results.  Hopefully be brewing this weekend.  Thanks again, and Cheers!
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: denny on February 08, 2011, 05:27:31 PM
Yeah, please let us know what you come up with!
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: bluesman on February 08, 2011, 05:39:38 PM
This past weekend I tried a St. Bernardus 8 Tripel agian after some time and found it to be just simply fantastic.

It's definitely well attenuated but yet has a medium mouthfeel. The hops make a nice presence as well. This beer a pale amber color and a flowery, fruity taste with a good balance between sweet and sour (8% alcohol content). This beer has a thick froth and strikes a balanced taste with a light bitterness.

To get your color up a bit I would go with a 90 min boil and pitch plenty of yeast in the low 60's.
 
 

Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on February 12, 2011, 06:01:34 PM
This past weekend I tried a St. Bernardus 8 Tripel agian after some time and found it to be just simply fantastic. 
I really like the St Bernardus ABT 12, also.  One of my faves!  There's a belgian beer pub in Denver called The Cheeky Monk that serves it on tap!
Title: Re: My Version of a Belgian Tripel
Post by: jamminbrew on March 26, 2011, 01:09:48 AM
Ok, here is my revised edition:
12# Belgian pilsener
1 # Caravienne
1/2# Aromatic
Single step mash 149* for 90 min
1  oz styrian goldings  60 min
1/2 oz styrian goldings 30 min
1/2 oz crystal   10 min
1/2 oz crystal knockout
2 # sugar  15 min
1 tsp irish moss 15 min
1/4 tsp servomyces 10 min
 O/G  1.080
just racked into secondary after 3 weeks, gravity is at 1.010
Smells great, tastes great.  Can't wait for it to be finished!  Thanks to all of you guys for your advice.  It helped a lot