Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

General Category => Yeast and Fermentation => Topic started by: Pinski on March 24, 2011, 03:44:47 PM

Title: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 24, 2011, 03:44:47 PM
Good afternoon,

So tomorrow my sweetie has volunteered to pick up a full corny keg at a local favorite brewery on her lunch hour.  When she dropped the keg off today she found out that she could also collect some yeast if she came in with a mason jar.
Here is my question. If she sterilizes the mason jar and lid tonight, takes it into the brewery during her lunch hour and has it filled; will the yeast be OK in the jar for 4-5 hours before it can be placed in the fridge to store until the next brew day? Should the lid just be loosely closed so that it can off gas if it warms up a bit?  Or should I have her take in an Erlenmeyer  and air lock?  Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

Cheers!
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 24, 2011, 03:52:47 PM
It should be fine in a mason jar, but it would be better if you had a little cooler she could keep it in.  It might already be pretty warm depending on what stage the beer is in at the brewery, so a cold pack would help too.  But even if you can't do any of that, sticking it in the trunk will keep it cooler than in the car itself.

How long until the next brew day?  That might be more of a concern.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jeffy on March 24, 2011, 04:02:52 PM
It should be fine in a mason jar, but it would be better if you had a little cooler she could keep it in.  It might already be pretty warm depending on what stage the beer is in at the brewery, so a cold pack would help too.  But even if you can't do any of that, sticking it in the trunk will keep it cooler than in the car itself.

How long until the next brew day?  That might be more of a concern.
It depends a lot on where you are.  The trunk in Florida would be the worst place to put yeast.
Keep the lid loose and keep the yeast as cold as possible until she gets home and puts it into the fridge.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 24, 2011, 04:05:47 PM
Yeah, I'm hoping she has a smalller cooler  and cold pack that she can take along as you suggested.  Would you close the lid tightly or leave it loose?
The next brew day is likely a couple weeks out. We've cranked out (6) 6.5 gallon batches since X-mas and the corny she's picking up tomorrow will be 5th to go into our new 7.3 cu. ft. Keezer. We need to drain (see drink) one to make room for the next which will be my first forray into the world of all grain. I'm really stoked about the whole deal really!  I want to take a shot at a Cascadian Dark Ale clone so I'm REALLY glad to have yeast coming from the brewery that makes the real deal. This site and forum has been tremendously inspiring and helpful!

Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 24, 2011, 04:29:21 PM
It depends a lot on where you are.  The trunk in Florida would be the worst place to put yeast.
Really?  I would have guessed that with the sun beating down on a parked car the cabin would heat up faster than the trunk, but you live with it so I'll take your word for it.

Tight or loose, it just depends on how sure you are it won't spill.  Loose is better, but not if it tips over on the drive home.  I keep it tight, in a 6-pack cooler, with a cold pack or an ice cube or two if available.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jeffy on March 24, 2011, 05:22:48 PM
It depends a lot on where you are.  The trunk in Florida would be the worst place to put yeast.
Really?  I would have guessed that with the sun beating down on a parked car the cabin would heat up faster than the trunk, but you live with it so I'll take your word for it.

Tight or loose, it just depends on how sure you are it won't spill.  Loose is better, but not if it tips over on the drive home.  I keep it tight, in a 6-pack cooler, with a cold pack or an ice cube or two if available.

I once picked up a slurry of fresh yeast from my local brewpub.  We filled up a quart mason jar and I put it into a cooler with a cold pack then relaxed and had a beer.  By the time I got home an hour later the yeast had started to warm up and even with the lid slightly loose it was building up pressure in the jar.  So it does depend on the temp the yeast was when harvested - try to match that or keep it even cooler for best results.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: euge on March 24, 2011, 06:14:58 PM
May I suggest NOT using glass and use a plastic storage container instead?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 24, 2011, 09:52:38 PM
I once picked up a slurry of fresh yeast from my local brewpub.  We filled up a quart mason jar and I put it into a cooler with a cold pack then relaxed and had a beer.  By the time I got home an hour later the yeast had started to warm up and even with the lid slightly loose it was building up pressure in the jar.  So it does depend on the temp the yeast was when harvested - try to match that or keep it even cooler for best results.
Are you sure it was done fermenting?

I agree, matching it or keeping it cooler is best for yeast health.  I wouldn't worry about the jar though, expansion from warming up isn't going to be enough to burst a glass jar unless its got a serious flaw.  If it hits 100F the yeast are going to be screwed, and the jar should handle that no problem.  Or you can use plastic like euge suggests, that works too.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 24, 2011, 09:58:35 PM
Thanks guys! She's going to put the jar in a 'lunch' cooler and found out she has a fridge at work that she can keep it in until beer thirty. 
So a secondary question... How long can one reasonably keep the yeast refrigerated in a sealed Mason jar and expect to be able to make a good healthy starter for pitching? I'm hoping for a couple weeks or so?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 24, 2011, 10:00:39 PM
A couple of weeks will be no problem.  I've made starters with yeast from a brewery after it sat for 2 months, and I'm sure it could have gone longer, it was still very vigorous.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jaybeerman on March 24, 2011, 10:09:45 PM
Thanks guys! She's going to put the jar in a 'lunch' cooler and found out she has a fridge at work that she can keep it in until beer thirty. 
So a secondary question... How long can one reasonably keep the yeast refrigerated in a sealed Mason jar and expect to be able to make a good healthy starter for pitching? I'm hoping for a couple weeks or so?

Just a thought - in a couple of weeks, when you're ready to brew,  I bet the brewery still has fresh slurry on hand.  They're likely brewing a batch at least once every two weeks, more likely several times a week.  The yeast she picks up tomorrow will be fine but there's nothing like bringing fresh slurry home and using it pronto.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: BarleynYeast on March 24, 2011, 10:25:56 PM
I don’t know if this is normal, but I get yeast quite often from my neighborhood brewery. It’s light and fluffy when we put it in a container and nearly always doubles in size by the time I get it home. Unless I want a yeast bath when opening I give it lots of head space!  :o
+1 on euge’s suggestion on using a nalgene or some type of plastic bottle.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: ibru on March 25, 2011, 01:46:23 PM
SHE is getting the keg and the yeast. SHE sanitizes... You married well my son!!! With my wife there would be paybacks, like a trip to the inlaws...

BTW, I love using fresh brewery yeast. Quick action!

Bruce
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tumarkin on March 25, 2011, 02:36:55 PM
SHE is getting the keg and the yeast. SHE sanitizes... You married well my son!!! With my wife there would be paybacks, like a trip to the inlaws...

BTW, I love using fresh brewery yeast. Quick action!

Bruce
there's always paybacks, that's why we' e got the term 'beer bullets.'  We all think we've married well (or why the f*ck did you do it?), but things change. it's all about balance & partnership. we all have to decide if it's working or not (and that's a moving target), but yes.... I'd agree.... sounds like you married well.  :D
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 25, 2011, 03:20:01 PM
Yes, SHE is a very enthusiastic brewmistress. SHE even sent me a pic of the fresh yeast just after harvest on the way home! Thanks again for all the great pointers folks!  OK, now how the heck do you add photos to these posts? img
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Hokerer on March 25, 2011, 04:00:37 PM
OK, now how the heck do you add photos to these posts? img

Look here...
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20.0 (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20.0)
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: ibru on March 25, 2011, 04:09:44 PM
 .
SHE is a very enthusiastic brewmistress
Quote

OK, Now I'm just plain jealous
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: oly on March 29, 2011, 01:02:33 PM
Hey Pinski, I see you're in Portland, me too. Where are you getting your yeast?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: blatz on March 29, 2011, 01:58:37 PM
It’s light and fluffy when we put it in a container and nearly always doubles in size by the time I get it home. +1 on euge’s suggestion on using a nalgene or some type of plastic bottle.


weird, it always seems to settle and 'halve' in size approximately for me.  but I put it in a cooler with ice, so maybe you're is getting warm and causing the expansion.

+1 on plastic if you can - but if you must use mason jars, I would try to not screw the ring part of the lid all the way down, leave it a quarter turn backed off.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 29, 2011, 11:06:36 PM
Hey Pinski, I see you're in Portland, me too. Where are you getting your yeast?

Hey Oly,
The Brewmistress was getting one of our Cornies filled with Hopwork's Secession CDA (my apologies to those averse to this name, at least I kept it to acromym) and she asked about yeast for homebrewers.  She said they were more than happy to oblige.  I can't remember the Wyeast number off the top of my head but I looked it up and it's a London Ale III and she said that the brewer mentioned that it was their standard ale yeast. 
Cheers!
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 30, 2011, 05:12:16 AM
That's the Wyeast 1318 yeast.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 30, 2011, 07:29:35 AM
That indeed is the correct number.  I really like their brews so I'm excited to try this strain on my own recipe.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 30, 2011, 08:11:29 AM
Try using it to make a Dark Mild.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 30, 2011, 03:59:19 PM
Isn't London Ale III the Boddingtons strain?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 30, 2011, 05:55:47 PM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jaybeerman on March 30, 2011, 07:52:18 PM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Interesting, I have to say that I'd take dirty dicks over any other dark mild.  Might have to give this yeast a go; wish we had easy access to wyeast instead of just white labs.  cheers, j
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 30, 2011, 10:58:07 PM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Interesting, I have to say that I'd take dirty dicks over any other dark mild.  Might have to give this yeast a go; wish we had easy access to wyeast instead of just white labs.  cheers, j
Where do you get your yeast?  I assume you've tried asking for wyeast strains?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pinski on March 30, 2011, 11:38:20 PM
Try using it to make a Dark Mild.
Do you have a favorite recipe you would recommend?
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 31, 2011, 05:49:43 AM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart (http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm) indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 07:47:36 AM
Denny, can you just ask Jess and clear it up?

I have mild recipes but am away from home without my recipe logs.  There's some good ones in the classic style series on Mild.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: denny on March 31, 2011, 07:49:33 AM
Denny, can you just ask Jess and clear it up?

I'll see what I can do, Gordon, or maybe Tom can.  Whatever it is, it does make a great mild. 
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: johnf on March 31, 2011, 08:00:06 AM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart (http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm) indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.

Not only does Wyeast call it London Ale III but they say it is from a traditional brewery in London. There aren't all that many traditional breweries in London. Boddington's doesn't fit the bill and we know Fuller's is 1968. So either the name and description are inaccurate or the Kris England list is inaccurate.

All this said, Wyeast is the company that calls 34/70 "Bohemian Lager". That isn't terribly inaccurate as 34/70 is probably the most popular lager strain in Bohemia as it is everywhere else lagers are made, but it isn't the best name possible.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 08:06:55 AM
And it's been available at least since the mid-1990s.  Boddingtons might not brew in Manchester and Youngs might not brew in London, but they did then.

The yeast suppliers often clean up or otherwise fiddle with the yeast before they sell it.  So they are often reluctant to say things like "WLPnnn is <brewery's> yeast" so I always ask "Did that yeast originate at that brewery?"

There are a few strains that I know positively the source since I heard it straight from the suppliers.  This isn't one of them, so I would like to know.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jaybeerman on March 31, 2011, 09:03:43 AM
Where do you get your yeast?  I assume you've tried asking for wyeast strains?

We have one local homebrew shop and the owner is a great guy, it's just that his profit margin is so slim that he can't afford to stock much of a selection.  Currently, it's easier for him to carry white labs.  I can order yeast from a Salt Lake City brew shop that's only 300 miles away; most of the time the yeast is in good condition when it arrives.  Anyway this is one Wyeast strain that I haven’t had the chance to use. cheers, j
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 31, 2011, 09:20:21 AM
Denny, can you just ask Jess and clear it up?

I'll see what I can do, Gordon, or maybe Tom can.  Whatever it is, it does make a great mild. 
I sent an email to Doss, I'll let you know what he says.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: denny on March 31, 2011, 10:12:19 AM
Thanks, Tom.  Tell Greg I said hi.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 31, 2011, 10:53:49 AM
Thanks, Tom.  Tell Greg I said hi.
As always ;)
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 31, 2011, 11:41:42 AM
Fwiw, I brew a boddingtons clone every year or so using London Ale III. It makes a respectable clone, IMO, even if it's not the actual Boddingtons strain.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 31, 2011, 03:02:21 PM
1318 should be very similar to Young's.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: denny on March 31, 2011, 03:22:37 PM
1318 should be very similar to Young's.

Gold star for Gordon!
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 04:21:08 PM
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: jaybeerman on March 31, 2011, 05:14:56 PM
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet" - isn't that the truth.  Nicely done!  cheers to all involved.  Wait a sec...damn, now I'm going to have to call them myself to make sure Tom's telling the truth.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: blatz on March 31, 2011, 05:20:22 PM
See?  Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

Thanks for following up.  It's nice to avoid weeks of speculation and thousands of lives by just asking someone at the source.

That's a bit of a problem, because a lot of folks think of Kristens chart as the final word  :-\
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on March 31, 2011, 05:35:09 PM
There's a lot of people who think you can't make a beer without a spreadsheet, too.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on March 31, 2011, 06:32:25 PM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart (http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm) indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.

What have we learned, gents?  That disclaimers preserve one's credibility!   ;D :P
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: bluesman on March 31, 2011, 06:34:02 PM
I've heard 1318 London Ale III is Boddington's and Young's is 1768.  :-\

 
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: bluesman on March 31, 2011, 06:35:43 PM
I hope not.  Boddingtons is in Manchester.  I thought it was Young's yeast.

Not that this is necessarily accurate, but Kristen England's Yeast Strain Comparison Chart (http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm) indicates that London Ale III is the Boddington's strain (despite the "London" Ale name).  IIRC, I don't think the Milk of Manchester is even brewed in Manchester anymore...could be wrong though.  In any case, I suppose what we would be more interested in is where the strain originated.

What have we learned, gents?  That disclaimers preserve one's credibility!   ;D :P

You've leared well Matt.   ;)  :)
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on March 31, 2011, 08:27:49 PM
1768 should be very similar to Fuller's. ;)
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: gordonstrong on April 01, 2011, 04:58:15 AM
You mean 1968, of course.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 06:37:13 AM
You mean 1968, of course.

Bingo!  8)
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: bluesman on April 01, 2011, 06:39:08 AM
1768 should be very similar to Fuller's. ;)

Young's vs. Fullers. The Superbrew championship!  8)

What this has to do with transporting yeast I'll never know but sorry for the thread hijack.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on April 01, 2011, 11:55:45 AM
You mean 1968, of course.
No, I meant 1768 should be very similar to Fuller's.  1968 should too.

(My emphasis)
Quote from: http://www.wyeastlab.com/pc4q2008.cfm
Wyeast 1768 PC English Special Bitter
A great yeast for malt predominate ales. Produces light fruit and ethanol aromas along with soft, nutty flavors. Exhibits a mild malt profile with a neutral finish. Bright beers are easily achieved without any filtration. It is similar to our 1968 London ESB Ale but slightly less flocculent.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on April 01, 2011, 12:22:00 PM
Speaking of Kristen England, it looks like he's the lastest of our ilk to go pro.  I can't wait to try Pubstitute...sounds very interesting!

http://heavytable.com/b-j-haun-and-kristen-england-of-pour-decisions-brewery/
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on April 01, 2011, 12:23:22 PM
You mean 1968, of course.
No, I meant 1768 should be very similar to Fuller's.  1968 should too.

(My emphasis)
Quote from: http://www.wyeastlab.com/pc4q2008.cfm
Wyeast 1768 PC English Special Bitter
A great yeast for malt predominate ales. Produces light fruit and ethanol aromas along with soft, nutty flavors. Exhibits a mild malt profile with a neutral finish. Bright beers are easily achieved without any filtration. It is similar to our 1968 London ESB Ale but slightly less flocculent.

Right, I could have sworn I've seen a VSS strain numbered 1768.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on April 01, 2011, 01:19:25 PM
Speaking of Kristen England, it looks like he's the lastest of our ilk to go pro.  I can't wait to try Pubstitute...sounds very interesting!

http://heavytable.com/b-j-haun-and-kristen-england-of-pour-decisions-brewery/
Good for Kris, that's awesome.  I hope they do well.
Title: Re: Transporting fresh yeast from brewery to home
Post by: tschmidlin on April 01, 2011, 01:21:29 PM
Right, I could have sworn I've seen a VSS strain numbered 1768.

Yeah, I should have quoted Ron's post when I started talking about 1768 . . .
I've heard 1318 London Ale III is Boddington's and Young's is 1768.  :-\