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General Category => Extract/Partial Mash Brewing => Topic started by: spydad45 on April 09, 2011, 11:39:20 PM

Title: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: spydad45 on April 09, 2011, 11:39:20 PM
I am dry hopping a double IPA and the directions say to add the hops after my beer has "dropped bright"
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: euge on April 09, 2011, 11:52:37 PM
I am dry hopping a double IPA and the directions say to add the hops after my beer has "dropped bright"

When the beer has cleared in the fermenter. You don't want the yeast coating the hops as release their goodness into the beer.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: tschmidlin on April 10, 2011, 06:16:38 AM
I am dry hopping a double IPA and the directions say to add the hops after my beer has "dropped bright"

When the beer has cleared in the fermenter. You don't want the yeast coating the hops as release their goodness into the beer.
And for that matter, you don't want the hoppy goodness coating the yeast as it falls out of solution.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: spydad45 on April 10, 2011, 01:22:43 PM
Thanks, that's sort of what I thought.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: bluesman on April 10, 2011, 02:12:42 PM
Some folks like to add the dry hops during the final stage of primary ferment (90%) to allow the yeast to scrub out any residual undesireables like O2 introduced upon dry hop, allthough I like to dry hop in the keg. Dropping bright is the point of complete primary fermentation when the beer is clear and ready for racking or bottling. The majority of the yeast has dropped out of suspension and active fermentation has ceased.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: sailortodd on June 09, 2011, 04:39:02 AM
Some folks like to add the dry hops during the final stage of primary ferment (90%) to allow the yeast to scrub out any residual undesireables like O2 introduced upon dry hop, allthough I like to dry hop in the keg. Dropping bright is the point of complete primary fermentation when the beer is clear and ready for racking or bottling. The majority of the yeast has dropped out of suspension and active fermentation has ceased.
I'm guessing dry hopping in the keg just keeps more of the hop aroma around, gives it less time to dissipate?

Had a question in the lines of dry hopping... I dry hop when the beer "drops bright" or at least when most activity has stopped since I'm still using plastic and don't see it clear up. I've read a couple of threads (on HBT) with discussions of racking to secondary, and many insisted that dry hopping was one of those times it was important, even if they were against a secondary for clarity, etc. Is there really much to gain from racking to a secondary container/fermenter to dry hop? Or is it just as effective to dry hop in the primary container?
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: bluesman on June 09, 2011, 11:21:41 AM
Some folks like to add the dry hops during the final stage of primary ferment (90%) to allow the yeast to scrub out any residual undesireables like O2 introduced upon dry hop, allthough I like to dry hop in the keg. Dropping bright is the point of complete primary fermentation when the beer is clear and ready for racking or bottling. The majority of the yeast has dropped out of suspension and active fermentation has ceased.
I'm guessing dry hopping in the keg just keeps more of the hop aroma around, gives it less time to dissipate?

Had a question in the lines of dry hopping... I dry hop when the beer "drops bright" or at least when most activity has stopped since I'm still using plastic and don't see it clear up. I've read a couple of threads (on HBT) with discussions of racking to secondary, and many insisted that dry hopping was one of those times it was important, even if they were against a secondary for clarity, etc. Is there really much to gain from racking to a secondary container/fermenter to dry hop? Or is it just as effective to dry hop in the primary container?

A secondary ferment is not necessary for most beers and to the contrary can be detrimental to the quality of the finished beer (oxidation, contamination, etc...). I recommend racking directly into the keg upon completion of the primary ferment (terminal gravity) when the beer drops bright, and then dry hopping in the keg (best yield). I prefer to use a muslin bag for dry hopping with a filament for easy retrieval.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: phillamb168 on June 09, 2011, 01:03:19 PM
Some folks like to add the dry hops during the final stage of primary ferment (90%) to allow the yeast to scrub out any residual undesireables like O2 introduced upon dry hop, allthough I like to dry hop in the keg. Dropping bright is the point of complete primary fermentation when the beer is clear and ready for racking or bottling. The majority of the yeast has dropped out of suspension and active fermentation has ceased.
I'm guessing dry hopping in the keg just keeps more of the hop aroma around, gives it less time to dissipate?

Had a question in the lines of dry hopping... I dry hop when the beer "drops bright" or at least when most activity has stopped since I'm still using plastic and don't see it clear up. I've read a couple of threads (on HBT) with discussions of racking to secondary, and many insisted that dry hopping was one of those times it was important, even if they were against a secondary for clarity, etc. Is there really much to gain from racking to a secondary container/fermenter to dry hop? Or is it just as effective to dry hop in the primary container?

A secondary ferment is not necessary for most beers and to the contrary can be detrimental to the quality of the finished beer (oxidation, contamination, etc...). I recommend racking directly into the keg upon completion of the primary ferment (terminal gravity) when the beer drops bright, and then dry hopping in the keg (best yield). I prefer to use a muslin bag for dry hopping with a filament for easy retrieval.

And throw a SS lug nut in the muslin bag with the hops so it doesn't float
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: JKL on June 09, 2011, 02:34:30 PM
Some folks like to add the dry hops during the final stage of primary ferment (90%) to allow the yeast to scrub out any residual undesireables like O2 introduced upon dry hop, allthough I like to dry hop in the keg. Dropping bright is the point of complete primary fermentation when the beer is clear and ready for racking or bottling. The majority of the yeast has dropped out of suspension and active fermentation has ceased.
I'm guessing dry hopping in the keg just keeps more of the hop aroma around, gives it less time to dissipate?

Had a question in the lines of dry hopping... I dry hop when the beer "drops bright" or at least when most activity has stopped since I'm still using plastic and don't see it clear up. I've read a couple of threads (on HBT) with discussions of racking to secondary, and many insisted that dry hopping was one of those times it was important, even if they were against a secondary for clarity, etc. Is there really much to gain from racking to a secondary container/fermenter to dry hop? Or is it just as effective to dry hop in the primary container?

A secondary ferment is not necessary for most beers and to the contrary can be detrimental to the quality of the finished beer (oxidation, contamination, etc...). I recommend racking directly into the keg upon completion of the primary ferment (terminal gravity) when the beer drops bright, and then dry hopping in the keg (best yield). I prefer to use a muslin bag for dry hopping with a filament for easy retrieval.

Filament? 

-J.K.L.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: Hokerer on June 09, 2011, 02:44:57 PM
A secondary ferment is not necessary for most beers and to the contrary can be detrimental to the quality of the finished beer (oxidation, contamination, etc...). I recommend racking directly into the keg upon completion of the primary ferment (terminal gravity) when the beer drops bright, and then dry hopping in the keg (best yield). I prefer to use a muslin bag for dry hopping with a filament for easy retrieval.

Filament?  

-J.K.L.

Believe he was referring to "monofilament" as in a short length of fishing line that can be used to pull the bag back out of the keg
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: bluesman on June 09, 2011, 02:47:56 PM
A secondary ferment is not necessary for most beers and to the contrary can be detrimental to the quality of the finished beer (oxidation, contamination, etc...). I recommend racking directly into the keg upon completion of the primary ferment (terminal gravity) when the beer drops bright, and then dry hopping in the keg (best yield). I prefer to use a muslin bag for dry hopping with a filament for easy retrieval.

Filament?  

-J.K.L.

Believe he was referring to "monofilament" as in a short length of fishing line that can be used to pull the bag back out of the keg

Yes.

...or dental floss.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: denny on June 09, 2011, 03:29:33 PM
And throw a SS lug nut in the muslin bag with the hops so it doesn't float

In my experience it really doesn't matter if it floats.  I never weight the bags and I have no issues with dry hopping.
Title: Re: What does "dropped bright" mean
Post by: blatz on June 09, 2011, 05:57:40 PM

...or dental floss.

or teflon tape  ;)