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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: euge on April 15, 2011, 08:36:10 AM

Title: Guacamole
Post by: euge on April 15, 2011, 08:36:10 AM
Mmm got the the 3am munchies?!

Fresh small ripe Haas avacado. Generous pinch of coarse salt. Half a pulverised clove of garlic. Red chile flake. Squeeze of lime. Mix well and let sit for 10 minutes for flavors to mingle. Devour with tortilla chips. Wipe bowl clean with finger.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_7QgdMVFUuKs/Taf_wdDXt0I/AAAAAAAAAGE/_v0EAXtDtK8/s640/2011-04-15%2003.11.40.jpg)
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: deepsouth on April 15, 2011, 12:05:51 PM
full of win.
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on April 15, 2011, 12:13:53 PM
I love me some guac.  My recipe is very similar but I add a finely chopped Serrano pepper in there for some more heat.  We have these monster-sized Florida avocados here but they aren't anywhere near as good as Haas.

The story of the Haas avocado is actually kind of cool.  From wikipedia:
Quote
History
All Hass avocado trees have been grown from seeds (or were grafted from the cuttings) of a single tree which was grown from a seed purchased in 1926 from A. R. Rideout of Whittier, California. At the time, Rideout was getting seeds from any source he could find, even food scraps from restaurants. Meanwhile, Hass would plant three seeds at a time in one spot and later keep only the strongest seedling which grew there.[1] In 1926 a planting of three seeds at his 1.5-acre grove at 430 West Road, La Habra Heights, California yielded one strong seedling.[1] After trying and failing at least twice to graft the seedling with branches from Fuerte trees (which were then the predominant commercial cultivar), Hass thought of cutting down the tree but his children liked the taste of its bumpy, odd fruit and he let it be.[1][2] The Guatemalen subspecies of the original seed from which the tree sprang is not known and the seed may have already been cross-pollinated when Hass bought it.[1][2]

Hass patented the tree in 1935 (the first US patent on a tree[1]) and made a contract with Whittier nurseryman Harold Brokaw to grow and sell trees produced from its seeds,[1][2] with Brokaw getting 75% of the proceeds. Brokaw then specialized in the Hass and often sold out of the trees since the Hass yields year-round (unlike the Fuerte) and has more and bigger fruit with a longer shelf life and richer flavor.[1][2] The Hass avocado had one of its first commercial successes at the Model Grocery Store on Colorado Street in Pasadena, California, where chefs working for some of the town's wealthy residents bought the new cultivar's big, nutty-tasting fruit for $1 each, a very high price at the time (more than US$15.00 of inflation adjusted value by 2007). However, Hass made a profit of less than US$5,000 from the patent because other growers would use single trees bought from Brokaw to graft entire orchards.[1]

Rudolph Hass carried on as a postman throughout his life and died of a heart attack at Fallbrook Hospital in Fallbrook, California in 1952, the same year his patent expired and not long after he had established a new 80-acre (320,000 m2) orchard.[1][2]

By the early 21st century the US avocado industry took in over $1 billion a year from the heavy-bearing, high quality Hass cultivar, which accounted for around 80% of all avocados grown worldwide.[2]

Fate of mother tree
Owing to later suburban sprawl in Southern California, the mother tree stood for many years in front of a residence in La Habra Heights. The tree died when it was 76 years old and was cut down on 11 September 2002 after a ten-year fight with phytophthora (root rot). Two plaques by the private residence at 426 West Road mark the spot where it grew. Keepsakes, jewelry and other gifts have been made from the tree's wood by a nephew of Rudolph Hass.[1][2] Each year in mid-May the city of La Habra Heights celebrates the Hass avocado at its Annual La Habra Heights Avocado Festival.

Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: punatic on April 17, 2011, 09:29:14 PM
Avocado trees grow wild here and the fruit is free for the picking.  I know where many good tasting trees are located and when they produce.  I have an extending fruit picking basket/pole that rides in the back of my pickup.  Otherwise you have to fight the mongooses for them (mongooses LOVE avocados). You can find ripe avocados here year-round if you know where to look.

Avocados do not produce seeds that are the same as the fruit they come from.  The seeds are almost certainly cross-breeds.  If you have a tree that produces fruit you like the best thing to do is air-layer.

Mangos are the same way here, except they fruit May - September.

I haven't bought avocados or mangos in over seven years, but I eat them all of the time.

I make an awesome avocado - tomato - Japanese cucumber - sweet oinion - salad... with olive oil, sea salt, and coarse-ground black pepper..
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on April 17, 2011, 09:42:39 PM
Love me some guacamole!  We start by roasting some garlic cloves and serrano peppers on a cast iron skillet.  Then mince the garlic and peppers and add them to the molcajete along with chopped cilantro, avocado, lime, and salt.  Mmm...reminds me of warmer times (it's flipping cold for April in MN right now).  I'm ready for summer fiestas!

(http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j137/mattschwandt/MolcajetewithGuac.jpg)
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: bluesman on April 17, 2011, 11:26:41 PM
Fresh guacamole is a real treat. I love it with fresh fried corn tortillas and fresh salsa with some sour cream on the side. It's all about fresh ingredients.

Gentlemen...you have officially sparked my appetite.  8)
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: 1vertical on May 04, 2011, 02:26:01 PM
Big Hint: A matching volume of Cottage Cheese will Double your Guacamole and
add no flavor...just doubles the distance your avacados will go..........

So when feeding the masses do this trick and be amazed!
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: euge on May 04, 2011, 02:38:23 PM
Some people use sour cream to do that. But then again I can tell when they do it.
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: phillamb168 on May 04, 2011, 02:51:30 PM
Big Hint: A matching volume of Cottage Cheese will Double your Guacamole and
add no flavor add no flavor (assuming everybody has been drinking)...just doubles the distance your avacados will go..........

So when feeding the masses do this trick and be amazed!

Fixed it
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: euge on May 04, 2011, 02:59:21 PM
Big Hint: A matching volume of Cottage Cheese will Double your Guacamole and
add no flavor add no flavor (assuming everybody has been drinking)...just doubles the distance your avacados will go..........

So when feeding the masses do this trick and be amazed!

Fixed it

I'd never get past the texture. ;D
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: 1vertical on May 04, 2011, 03:14:48 PM
Big Hint: A matching volume of Cottage Cheese will Double your Guacamole and
add no flavor add no flavor (assuming everybody has been drinking)...just doubles the distance your avacados will go..........

So when feeding the masses do this trick and be amazed!

Fixed it

I'd never get past the texture. ;D
You will be amazed, the texture blends right in!
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: blatz on May 04, 2011, 03:15:47 PM
hmm i love good guac.  wonder if the weaze has ever tried guac with crumbled bacon in it?
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: maxieboy on May 04, 2011, 04:31:59 PM
Better odds that he's had a bowl of bacon topped w/ a little guac...   ;D
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: EHall on May 04, 2011, 06:29:54 PM
I wonder if Osma's brains looked like guacomole when they spilled out?
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 04, 2011, 07:34:37 PM
I wonder if Osma's brains looked like guacomole when they spilled out?
Haas-free guacamole with no citrus juice and has sat out for 2 days imo.
Title: Re: Guacamole
Post by: punatic on May 05, 2011, 10:05:53 AM
I wonder if Osma's brains looked like guacomole when they spilled out?

They needed a bit of salt water...  ;D