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General Category => Kegging and Bottling => Topic started by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 07:46:06 PM

Title: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 07:46:06 PM
So I'm making sort of a Belgian Strong Golden Ale and want to experiment with adding yeast prior to bottling to get the high carbonation typical of Belgian-style ales from the bottle.

I was considering just pitching dry yeast right into the secondary fermenter 2-3 days before bottling.  I would then cork and cap (instead of caging) 22oz bomber bottles for conditioning.

If anyone can out there could share their wisdom on this technique I sure would appreciate it. :-\
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: Beer Monger on April 25, 2011, 07:54:46 PM
I've never tried something like that, but pitching yeast 2-3 days before bottling would make me nervous. 

Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: denny on April 25, 2011, 07:55:08 PM
What's the theory with adding it 2-3 days before bottling?
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 07:57:34 PM
I suppose it gives a little time to start before I throw them in a bottle?

Should the yeast just before bottling?

I really don't know, that's why I'm asking. :)
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: tschmidlin on April 25, 2011, 07:59:30 PM
I suppose it gives a little time to start before I throw them in a bottle?
Start on what?  Presumably the beer was finished already.
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: Beer Monger on April 25, 2011, 08:02:15 PM
Also, considering the extra pressure you want in the bottles for your CO2 volumes, will bombers be strong enough?  Perhaps you need to be looking at champagne bottles.

Do you believe your primary yeast is too 'pooped out' to provide any carbonation just by priming your beer (adding a bit of corn sugar) just before bottling? 
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 08:04:51 PM
I suppose it gives a little time to start before I throw them in a bottle?
Start on what?  Presumably the beer was finished already.

Ok - I suppose it doesn't make sense - the priming is what the yeast is going to use.

Should I mix the dry yeast in at the time of priming & bottling?
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: tschmidlin on April 25, 2011, 08:07:17 PM
I suppose it gives a little time to start before I throw them in a bottle?
Start on what?  Presumably the beer was finished already.

Ok - I suppose it doesn't make sense - the priming is what the yeast is going to use.

Should I mix the dry yeast in at the time of priming & bottling?
That's how most people do it.  Half a pack should be enough.  Think about rehydrating it first.

The bottles really might not be strong enough, it's something to consider.
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 08:10:43 PM
Good point on the bottles.  I do have quite a lot of Belgian bottles on hand.

Also - is it possible to get the same results by just bumping up the priming sugar?
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: morticaixavier on April 25, 2011, 08:14:48 PM
Good point on the bottles.  I do have quite a lot of Belgian bottles on hand.

Also - is it possible to get the same results by just bumping up the priming sugar?

the amount of priming sugar is what will determine your carbonation level. The reason to add more yeast is because with higher gravity beers the remaining yeast can be stressed and weak. The amount of yeast does not affect the carbonation levels except if there isn't enough there to do the job. It will affect the speed at which the carbonation happens though.
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: Beer Monger on April 25, 2011, 08:15:30 PM
^What he said.  Basicall yes, as long as your yeast isn't too 'pooped'. 
Title: Re: pitching yeast before bottling
Post by: scoobybrew on April 25, 2011, 08:25:57 PM
Excellent information all - thanks.  This gives me a better handle on the situation.

This is why I love this forum.

 ;D