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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: dons on April 29, 2011, 06:08:51 PM

Title: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on April 29, 2011, 06:08:51 PM
I'm not going to bore you by telling you how I got into this predicament.  Suffice to say that my mind was confused BEFORE going into my supplier and, after talking to the guy and NOT MAKING NOTES, a week later I'm completely lost in space. 

Here's where I am.  I am brewing an all-grain, pale tomorrow - in about 22 hours.  My brew store is a round trip of 4 hours, so the supplies I have are what I'm going to have to use.  My grain is 10.5 pounds of 2-row, .5 pounds of Crystal 45 and .5 pounds of Cara pils.

Here is the quiz.  I'm going to tell you the hops that I have and would like your suggestion as to how to use them.  I THOUGHT that I knew what I was going to do, but the hops that I happen to have are NOT what I had asked for when procuring supplies (nuff said about that). 

1 oz. Chinook
2 oz. Centennial
2 oz. Columbus

Assuming a 60 minute boil, how much of what do I use when?  I'm nearly sure that I want to use all of the Columbus to dry-hop.  If you agree with that, that leaves 2 ounces of Centennial and 1 ounce of Chinook for the bitter, flavor and aroma.

My "sense" is that I want to do something like chinook at 60, 1 ounce of centennial at 10 and the last once of Centennial at 5.  With the Columbus for the dry hop.

Can anyone tell me if that would be a decent idea?

Thanks much in advance,
as ever
The Noob...

Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: tumarkin on April 29, 2011, 06:15:40 PM
tha'll certainly work. however, if it were me, I'd use the columbus for the flavor additions and centennial for late flavor and dry hop. the chinook is a good bittering hop. columbus (also called tomahawk) is a high alpha, but dual purpose hop. whatever you decide to do, pay attention to your results. see if you're happy or if you'd like to try a different tack next time. take good notes.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: EHall on April 29, 2011, 06:15:49 PM
Need to know the AA% of each of what hops you have. You said you want to make a pale ale... how many IBUs are you shooting for? or do you want to make something closer to an IPA? but otherwise the hop sched you have can/will work.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: trev on April 29, 2011, 06:21:15 PM
1 oz columbus 60 min
1 oz centennial 30min
1 oz centennial 5 min
1 oz. Chinook 0 min
1 oz columbus dry hop
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: hamiltont on April 29, 2011, 06:39:36 PM
Give this some thought. It's similar to how I hop most of my APA's & IPA's.  I really enjoy the flavor & aroma of the late additions. ~ 40 IBU's.  Cheers!!!


10 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

5 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

0 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

Dry Hop
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: jaybeerman on April 29, 2011, 06:47:43 PM
Columbus is a perfect hop for late and dry hopping.  Centennial is great flavor hop but a great all around hop.  Chinook is a love/hate hop - do you personally like the flavor of Chinook (or the flavor description)? IMO chinook is great with centennial as a flavor addition, but like I said some people hate it.  If you wanted you could use some of the Chinook as FWH, for subtle flavoring.  Or if you didn't want any flavoring from the Chinook but still want a bit of hop complexity, you could go with

1 oz Chinook 60 min
1 oz centennial 10 min
1 oz Columbus 5 min
1 oz centennial dry hop
1 oz Columbus dry hop

Really it's up to you and your best bet is to read up on the flavor and aroma descriptions of each hop and decide for yourself.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: bluesman on April 29, 2011, 06:48:09 PM
Give this some thought. It's similar to how I hop most of my APA's & IPA's.  I really enjoy the flavor & aroma of the late additions. Cheers!!!

60 minutes
.5 oz Chinook

15 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

10 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

5 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

Dry Hop
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial


+1

If you want a moderate bitterness and more flavor/aroma then this is the way to go. If you like a more firm bitterness then adjust by increasing the bittering addition (60min).

Personally I like hamiltont's suggestion.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: hamiltont on April 29, 2011, 06:52:22 PM
Give this some thought. It's similar to how I hop most of my APA's & IPA's.  I really enjoy the flavor & aroma of the late additions. Cheers!!!

60 minutes
.5 oz Chinook

15 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

10 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

5 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

Dry Hop
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial


+1

If you want a moderate bitterness and more flavor/aroma then this is the way to go. If you like a more firm bitterness then adjust by increasing the bittering addition (60min).

Personally I like hamiltont's suggestion.

I went back & changed it a little after running it through the gonkulator.  It was about 80 IBU's as originally posted. A little hoppy for a Pale Ale, at least for me.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on April 29, 2011, 06:53:35 PM
Wow, such quick response.  You guys are awesome.

To answer:  the supplier listed alphas as follows:
Chinook 13.6
Centennial 8.8
Columbus 14.6

I have really no target for IBUs - but I prefer more hops than bitter - I know, that does not answer you.

Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: tschmidlin on April 29, 2011, 06:55:13 PM
It also helps to know your target OG/FG, but you've got lots of good suggestions above.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: denny on April 29, 2011, 06:56:54 PM
Nobody givin' FWH any love?  I'd use an oz. of the Centennial as FWH.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: hamiltont on April 29, 2011, 07:00:11 PM
With this hop schedule, the grains you mentioned and assuming 75% Efficiency & and FG of 1.010 -  I'm getting an OG of 1.063. Alcohol by Volume of 6.9% and IBU's of 40.  Cheers!!!

10 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

5 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz Chinook
.5 oz. Centennial

0 minutes
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial

Dry Hop
.5 oz Columbus
.5 oz. Centennial
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on April 30, 2011, 10:12:52 PM
Okay, brewing done and, so far, I'm very pleased.  Thanks again to all the suggestions.  What I did was the following:

.5 oz Centennial at FWH
.5 oz Chinook at 60
.5 oz Columbus at 10
.5 oz Columbus, .5 oz Chinook, .5 oz Centennial at 5
.5 oz Columbus, .5 oz Centennial at 0
(will dry hop with .5 oz Centennial, .5 oz Columbus)

OG 1.062.   Nearly equal to what Hamiltont forecast.

By the way, for fly sparging I used the "Zapap Lauter Tun" as described in the Papazian book.  I drilled the holes a bit smaller than he suggested and I added a layer of padding from Home Depot that is shelf lining for a heavy tool drawer - the holes looked perfect.  It worked REALLY well.  Steady flow of very clear liquid in the sparge and I took about an hour for the process.  After 40 minutes all hints of sweetness was gone from the run off.  It was a big gamble for me, because I know most (all?) of you use a different process but this looked like the easiest for me and I wanted to try it.  Big victory for me here.

All in all, I have really high hopes!
Thanks a ton again for the help!
Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on May 01, 2011, 12:29:33 AM
What was the padding for?
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on May 01, 2011, 06:34:48 AM
Sorry, poor explanation.  I was still worried about grain getting through the holes I drilled and getting stuck in the tap/piping coming off the bottling bucket (into which the lauter tun leeched wort - is it really "wort" at this time?), so I put a layer of this shelf material, which had much smaller holes than the ones I drilled in the bottom of the bucket, in the bottom of the lauter tun to serve as another "sieve" in the bottom of that bucket.  The holes in this plastic "fabric" were very much akin to the size of the holes in the mini-cooler sieve material that I always used for my extract brewing from the kit I purchased when I first got in to brewing.

So, if you can picture:  I set the lauter tun with the extra sieve material on the bottom inside the bottling bucket - it fit so there was about 4 inches left in the bottom bucket.  Then I attached clear tubing to the tap of the bottling bucket and and directed it into a 8 gallon kettle to catch the "wort".  I scooped all of the steeped mash into the top bucket and proceeded to sparge 4 gallons of heated water over the grain, about a quart at a time keeping a layer of water on top of the grain.  It took an hour, with the flow into the kettle controlled by the tap in the bottling bucket.  As a noob to the all-grain process, I think this would be considered fly sparging.

Long explanation and probably confusing, but I tried to be clear for anyone who might want to consider doing the sparge process this way.  As well as the process that everyone here seems to use works (the custom manifold with slits cut into it in in the bottom of a 48 quart cooler) doing batch sparging, I just wanted to lay out another way to sparge that worked really well and did not require making that daunting (to me) constructed manifold.

Hope this was clear - if anyone was really interested. 
Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on May 02, 2011, 04:10:34 AM
I do the same thing without the padding.  That is, I have a bucket in bucket lauter tun and fly sparge.  I put the whole thing in an insulated box so that I can use it as a mash tun as well, avoiding the need to transfer between mash tun and lauter tun.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on May 28, 2011, 05:46:09 PM
Nothing to do with hops, but still on the beer I mentioned here.

I brewed on April 30.  Racked to secondary on May 5.  Today is 3 weeks and 2 days
since racking (nearly a month since brewing).  I know, I'm told not to trust bubble rate
but note the following.  2 weeks ago the bubble rate was 70 seconds.   1 week ago
the bubble rate was 50 seconds.  Today, the bubble rate is 30 seconds.  

This is just making no sense to me.  I did make a seemingly very good starter, but should
this not have calmed down by now?

This morning, I took a sample and the hydrometer reading is 1.011.  I KNOW that, according
to this, the beer is ready to bottle.  However, with that bubble rate I'm afraid of blowing up
bottles (been there, done that).  By the way  Hamiltont's estimate of OG and FG was just
spot on (where do I find a calculator like that??).  

So, what should I do?  Drinking the beer, it seems like probably my best to date and I'm
anxious to get this done (also need the space for another batch).

You guys have been SO helpful, thought I'd make this plea.

Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: tschmidlin on May 28, 2011, 07:20:14 PM
You've answered your own question.

I know, I'm told not to trust bubble rate

It could be bubbling for a number of reasons, including temperature fluctuations.  Bottle it.

Next time, don't rack to secondary until the beer is finished, then rack to a bottling bucket and bottle it.  It's been 4 weeks, if you'd left it in primary you probably could have bottled it 2 weeks ago.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: thomasbarnes on May 30, 2011, 05:53:07 AM
Have you been tasting the samples you've drawn off for gravity readings? If you're getting off-flavors, it could be a sign that you've got an incipient infection (probably wild yeast or lactobacillus).

In either case, the increase in bubbling might be a sign that one of the bad bugs gobbling up the dextrins in your beer.

In any case, bottle it, let it condition for a week and taste it again. A long, slow, but intense gushing means that you've got an infection (unless you overprimed or bottled before you hit your FG). A crisp, yogurt-like sour which you can only detect in flavor means lactobacillus infection, while smoky, medicinal or clove-like aromas and flavors means wild yeast.

If you're worried about bottle bombs, put your bottles in a covered plastic storage bin - the lid and sides will catch any shrapnel, the bottom will catch any spills. Alternately, put the bottles in a sacrificial cardboard box on a surface you can easily clean and sanitize like a basement or garage floor. If you do get a bottle explosion, just remember to not pick up the soggy cardboard box!

If you do get bottle bombs, try to chill the remaining bottles to as close to freezing as you can get. Then carefully uncap them while wearing leather gloves, a long-sleeved shirt and safety goggles.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on May 30, 2011, 04:46:36 PM
I tend to trust the bubbles more than others.  Unless you're sure they're from temperature fluctuations, I'd wait ot bottle to avoid bottle bombs.

Edit: And if you're going to go the cardboard box route, seal the box.  I had a bottle bomb go off in one that was just closed, but not sealed.  I had beer on the ceiling...
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: denny on May 30, 2011, 04:48:40 PM
Me, I tend to trust the bubbles more than others.  Unless you're sure they're from temperature fluctuations, I'd wait ot bottle to avoid bottle bombs.

You might be waiting a long time with that philosophy.  A gravity reading is the only way to know what's really going on.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: a10t2 on May 31, 2011, 12:24:11 AM
You might be waiting a long time with that philosophy.  A gravity reading is the only way to know what's really going on.

Could not agree more. Even with the temperature constant, the fermenter will continue to off-gas CO2 for weeks after fermentation is finished.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on May 31, 2011, 04:25:52 AM
Well, my fermenters don't.  Not saying that you and Denny are wrong necessarily.  Bubbles mean that pressure is building in the fermenter headspace, either from an increase in temperature, or from something outgassing from the wort, which could mean fermentation. 

After a couple of weeks, my airlocks are dead quiet, so that's when I package.  I don't test my gravity during fermentation, only after I think it's over.  That's just because I'm lazy and I don't like to open my fermenter to take gravity tests.  In fact, this may be why your fermenters continue to bubble, with each test you are letting out CO2 and letting in room air, decreasing the concentration of CO2 in the headspace.  I could see where that would lead to CO2 coming out of solution in the wort over time and making bubbles in the airlock even after fermentation is complete.  I doubt that would happen otherwise as the partial pressures of CO2 in and out of solution should equilibrate during fermentation.

If you're going to kegs, none of this matters anyway as you can easily adjust the pressure in the keg if there is a problem.  But I don't recommend going to bottles, especially in the presence of increasing airlock activity, assuming that the temp isn't rising.  Bubbles in the airlock means that the pressure would rise in a sealed container, regardless of the source of the bubbles.  One bubble every 30 seconds may not be a big deal, but there's no way to adjust the pressure after bottling.  As always, you should use the methods that best suit your process and your beer.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: ccarlson on May 31, 2011, 11:26:47 AM
Quote
After a couple of weeks, my airlocks are dead quiet,... 

So are mine. Bubbles are a great gauge for telling you when it's time to take another gravity reading. I also agree that presence CO2 bubbles doesn't just happen without a reason. It's either due to fermentation, temperature change, dry hopping or simply moving the fermenter, but whatever the case, it will eventually stop.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: a10t2 on May 31, 2011, 01:40:23 PM
Bubbles mean that pressure is building in the fermenter headspace, either from an increase in temperature, or from something outgassing from the wort, which could mean fermentation.

It could mean fermentation, but I don't believe it necessarily does. Once fermentation is finished, the beer is super-saturated with CO2. The partial pressure of gases in solution will exponentially decay as it approaches the atmospheric pressure, but if I had to guess I'd say the time constant is on the order of several days - based on the fact that I continue to see the occasional bubble for weeks.

In fact, I see the same thing at work where we're pulling from a sample port and therefore decreasing the pressure in the fermenter headspace. The blowoff buckets continue to bubble every once in a while for the entire warm maturation period. Granted, that's typically less than a week, since I tend to let things sit longer at home.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 03:37:19 PM
It could mean fermentation, but I don't believe it necessarily does. Once fermentation is finished, the beer is super-saturated with CO2. The partial pressure of gases in solution will exponentially decay as it approaches the atmospheric pressure, but if I had to guess I'd say the time constant is on the order of several days - based on the fact that I continue to see the occasional bubble for weeks.

THIS^^^^
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on June 01, 2011, 06:36:53 AM
It could mean fermentation, but I don't believe it necessarily does. Once fermentation is finished, the beer is super-saturated with CO2. The partial pressure of gases in solution will exponentially decay as it approaches the atmospheric pressure, but if I had to guess I'd say the time constant is on the order of several days - based on the fact that I continue to see the occasional bubble for weeks.

THIS^^^^

WHAT?!^^^^   ;D

I hear you guys.  Just discussing here, but...  Freshly fermented beer is supersaturated with CO2.  But it is also underneath an atmosphere with a high CO2 concentration.  Even if it wasn't, how long does it take for an open beer, or a soda, to go flat?  That's just a release of supersaturated CO2, and from a much higher dissolved concentration than in a fermenter that has a mechanism for releasing pressure.

Sean, if you're decreasing the pressure in the fermenter headspace by pulling from a sample port, then it sounds like you're not using any type of liquid airlock?  Or are you getting suck back (even if it is not enough to actually pull airlock liquid back into your fermenter)?  And it sounds like you're bringing the temperature up for warm maturation?  That would result in bubbles.

Just my experience on a homebrew scale, I've never fermented in a container larger than 7.5 gallons where maybe things are different.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: ccarlson on June 01, 2011, 11:25:30 AM
It could mean fermentation, but I don't believe it necessarily does. Once fermentation is finished, the beer is super-saturated with CO2. The partial pressure of gases in solution will exponentially decay as it approaches the atmospheric pressure, but if I had to guess I'd say the time constant is on the order of several days - based on the fact that I continue to see the occasional bubble for weeks.

THIS^^^^

WHAT?!^^^^   ;D

I hear you guys.  Just discussing here, but...  Freshly fermented beer is supersaturated with CO2.  But it is also underneath an atmosphere with a high CO2 concentration.  Even if it wasn't, how long does it take for an open beer, or a soda, to go flat?  That's just a release of supersaturated CO2, and from a much higher dissolved concentration than in a fermenter that has a mechanism for releasing pressure.

Sean, if you're decreasing the pressure in the fermenter headspace by pulling from a sample port, then it sounds like you're not using any type of liquid airlock?  Or are you getting suck back (even if it is not enough to actually pull airlock liquid back into your fermenter)?  And it sounds like you're bringing the temperature up for warm maturation?  That would result in bubbles.

Just my experience on a homebrew scale, I've never fermented in a container larger than 7.5 gallons where maybe things are different.

THAT ^^^^
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: a10t2 on June 01, 2011, 02:12:59 PM
Even if it wasn't, how long does it take for an open beer, or a soda, to go flat?  That's just a release of supersaturated CO2, and from a much higher dissolved concentration than in a fermenter that has a mechanism for releasing pressure.

Maybe 2-3 days, without an airlock?

Sean, if you're decreasing the pressure in the fermenter headspace by pulling from a sample port, then it sounds like you're not using any type of liquid airlock?  Or are you getting suck back (even if it is not enough to actually pull airlock liquid back into your fermenter)?  And it sounds like you're bringing the temperature up for warm maturation?  That would result in bubbles.

We do use a liquid airlock, a tube from the top TC port to a bucket of sani on the floor. There would have to be a pretty significant decrease in pressure for any sani to get in the fermenter.

We do bring the temperature up, on roughly the third day of fermentation. After that it stays at 72±1°F for a week or so before we cold crash it. Typically our ales will reach FG on day 5-6 (verified by daily hydrometer readings) but continue to off-gas until we crash them on about day 12.

Just my experience on a homebrew scale, I've never fermented in a container larger than 7.5 gallons where maybe things are different.

There is a really simple experiment you could do next time. A week or two after active fermentation is finished, agitate the fermenter. I'd bet money on you seeing a burst of airlock activity, indicating that the CO2 in solution hasn't come to equilibrium.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on June 01, 2011, 02:40:40 PM
Well, hmmmmm.

I made the decision to go ahead and bottle on Sunday (25 second bubbles).  Whatever the reason for the action, I'm hoping I do not end up with a situation like my last batch of AG - increasing eruptions upon opening.  The final bottle I opened left me with exactly 3 ounces of liquid.  However it was good.

As for this batch, I did sample at bottle time and it was really, really good.  Detected no off flavors at all.  As for temperature, I use a wine cooler for storage and is consistently 68 degrees F.  At 1.011 "FG", it was clearly done fermenting.  Being worried about the bubble rate, I used only a half cup of priming sugar.  After 3 days now, no bottle rockets yet. 

If "intense gushing" means I have an infection (and same with previous batch), I've a mind to just give up on the AG brewing and go back to (gasp!) extracts.  I am VERY careful of sanitation when I brew - nothing else I can think to do.  Of this is "off gas CO2", then I do not know the reason, but I'm tired of wasting 2/3 of my brew just because I open the bottles.  Yes, perhaps I should go to kegging, but I have space issues. 

I guess it would have eventually stopped bubbling and then maybe I would not be risking the high volatility of the final product.  But I had to make a decision to go and I did.  If there would have been a noticeable decline in bubble rate, I would have waited, but it was increasing - as unlikely as that seems.

BTW, as far as airlock (trying to answer everyone's questions), I destroyed mine when I racked to secondary, so I was just using a blowoff tube run into a pitcher of water.  I don't see how I could have been getting "suck back" there.

Maybe AG brewing is not for me - yeah, I'm getting depressed.  lol

Thanks all.
Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: tomsawyer on June 01, 2011, 02:48:27 PM
Next time, don't rack to secondary until the beer is finished, then rack to a bottling bucket and bottle it.  It's been 4 weeks, if you'd left it in primary you probably could have bottled it 2 weeks ago.

+1 to this advice.  Its possible that your extended bubbling is from a fermentation that was interrupted and was/is struggling to finish. 
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Hokerer on June 01, 2011, 03:15:57 PM
If "intense gushing" means I have an infection (and same with previous batch), I've a mind to just give up on the AG brewing and go back to (gasp!) extracts.  I am VERY careful of sanitation when I brew - nothing else I can think to do. 

Maybe AG brewing is not for me - yeah, I'm getting depressed.  lol

How could AG vs Extract really affect this?  The differences between to two are almost all before the boil whereas infections usually come from something post-boil.  Post-boil, the processes/equipment/etc for AG and Extract are pretty much identical.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on June 01, 2011, 03:54:15 PM
That's true, Hokerer.  I'm just frustrated - I've not had this kind of issue before and it seemed to come with AG, but that should not matter, I understand.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on June 02, 2011, 02:21:14 AM

There is a really simple experiment you could do next time. A week or two after active fermentation is finished, agitate the fermenter. I'd bet money on you seeing a burst of airlock activity, indicating that the CO2 in solution hasn't come to equilibrium.

Will do, my mash depth experiments are happily burbling away.  A little too happily - it has inadvertantly become a blow-off v. no blow-off side by side batch, too.  :)  But it will be perfect for this.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: dons on June 09, 2011, 03:21:18 PM
An update.  After 10 days, had a few bottles of the beer.

It is wonderful.  Thanks to everyone who has helped.

One question:  at bottling time, the sampling I took was crystal clear.  Was amazing.  The first bottle I drank, the clarity
was just as good.  The second bottle was very hazy (yes, I poured them both correctly).  Looking through the rest of the
bottles, it seems that there is the gamut - from very hazy to extremely clear.  Most have some sediment floating around in
them - even the very clear ones.

I was careful to mix my priming sugar in well before bottling - trying to take care not to aerate, to the best of my ability.

Any suggestions as to what happened here?

Thanks.
Don
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: morticaixavier on June 09, 2011, 03:40:13 PM
dons,

on the AG v Extract and infection front, do you grind your own grain? if so do you do it in an area that might allow a small amount of grain dust to then settle in a way that would potentially get in your finished wort or beer? grain is a great carrier of infectious microbiota.

additionally the difference between extract and AG in terms of gushing could have to do with mash temps producing a more fermentable wort than expected. whereas with an extract recipe you can pretty easily say that and OG of x will result in an FG of y as the fermentability is fairly constant. while with AG a couple of degrees difference in mash temp could produce significantly different expected FGs. just a thought.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: a10t2 on June 09, 2011, 04:03:23 PM
My guess would be that after 10 days they haven't all fully carbonated, and some still have yeast in suspension. Give it another week and they'll probably start to settle out.
Title: Re: Hops Quiz
Post by: Will's Swill on June 25, 2011, 09:15:12 PM

There is a really simple experiment you could do next time. A week or two after active fermentation is finished, agitate the fermenter. I'd bet money on you seeing a burst of airlock activity, indicating that the CO2 in solution hasn't come to equilibrium.

Will do, my mash depth experiments are happily burbling away.  A little too happily - it has inadvertantly become a blow-off v. no blow-off side by side batch, too.  :)  But it will be perfect for this.

The kreusen on the no blow-off batch finally dropped on Monday, though airlock activity has been dead for a while.  I shook the crap out of it today, enough to get it to foam.  No airlock bubbles after shaking it.  The airlock has been in place since I pitched, so I would imagine that the CO2 levels inside the fermenter headspace are quite high.  On the other hand, the blow-off batch blew the water out of its airlock and was exposed to the air for 12-24 hours.  It was exposed again when I removed the blow-off tube that I hastily fitted and replaced it with an airlock.  The water in that airlock is still under pressure and I'm quite sure that if I shook that batch, the airlock would bubble.

So I stand by my highly scientific experiment and my thoughts about CO2 stated in this thread.   ;)