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Other than Brewing => All Things Food => Topic started by: blatz on May 05, 2011, 03:19:12 PM

Title: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 05, 2011, 03:19:12 PM
I'd like to use our rotisserie for dinner on Sunday - did chickens last weekend which were awesome, but frankly, I don't have any good ideas beyond that, so throw out some ideas/recipes if ya got em!

Cheers!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: tumarkin on May 05, 2011, 03:20:24 PM
can't help much, never used one. but a thought.... what about roast beast?
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: Slowbrew on May 05, 2011, 03:34:01 PM
Beef rolled roast or any cut you can stuff with vegies or bread stuffing, roll and tie.

Dang it!  Now I'm hungry.

Paul
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 05, 2011, 03:42:25 PM
can't help much, never used one. but a thought.... what about roast beast?

what and invite the Grinch to come steal our dinner  ;D :D ;)

sounds good guys - keep em coming!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: corkybstewart on May 05, 2011, 04:14:51 PM
One of our favorites is boston butt pork roast with about 15-20 garlic cloves inserted into the meat.    We used to do boneless pork loins but it's almost impossible to find one now that's not injected with "15% flavor solution".  WTF is that crap and why do you have to put it in my pork?
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 05, 2011, 04:20:11 PM
Occasionally I get a pork roast that looks like a miniature pork-version of a standing rib roast.  The rib bones are fairly short.  I think they call it pork loin rib roast or something like that.  It's really cheap and makes a good pork roast imo.  Or if your splurging for Mother's Day; a standing rib roast.

The roulade/braciole Slowbrew posted sounds really good too.   Mmmmmmm, Giada.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: johnf on May 05, 2011, 04:27:54 PM
One of our favorites is boston butt pork roast with about 15-20 garlic cloves inserted into the meat.    We used to do boneless pork loins but it's almost impossible to find one now that's not injected with "15% flavor solution".  WTF is that crap and why do you have to put it in my pork?

On the assumption that hispanic markets are not rare in New Mexico, they often sell minimally processed pork (and other meat).

I can get non-injected loins and tenderloins at my family owned neighborhood grocery store but I have not seen one in a normal grocery store in a long time. That said they always seem to have loin chops that appear to have come from a non-injected loin. If they are doing butchering in the store, it wouldn't hurt to ask if you can buy the loin from the butcher counter rather than the packaged injected stuff from the case.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: bluesman on May 05, 2011, 04:43:13 PM
I usually rotisserie chicken but I want to try shish kebob. I am thinking about getting some cages or this special attachment.

http://www.thegrilldaddy2011.co.cc/Napoleon_64007_Rotisserie_Shish_Kebab_Wheel-B0046XSI38.html

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41HP0bGSSnL._SL240_.jpg)

I love the al pastor but this a vertical setup which would require a much more extensive setup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_pastor

(http://www.seriouseats.com/images/potd-cincodemayo-alpastor.jpg)
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 05, 2011, 05:06:28 PM
Pork loin on the rotisserie.

Stud & rub with fresh garlic and rosemary and olive oil- salt & pepper is all you need. Rotisserie at 350 until 160 interior. Let rest and slice.

Serve with steamed or roasted potatoes and greens.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 05, 2011, 05:34:09 PM
thanks guys - I hope to stop by my butcher tonight on the way home from work and take a look at these cuts you've mentioned and see what I'll do - I may get something tonight or just price it out and go back.

I have a feeling standing rib roast may be a bit too much this time, but perhaps there's a sale - pork loin might be the winner.

Czech Pils, Bock, Helles, RIS and IPA all on tap - should be a good day!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: tschmidlin on May 05, 2011, 05:34:16 PM
I haven't tried these recipes (don't have a rotisserie) but Raichlen's recipes are usually awesome.

http://www.primalgrill.org/htdocs/rotisserie.html
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 02:18:27 AM
stopped by my butcher - pork loin roast with bone = $4.99/lb.  Rib roast = $12.99/lb so I went with the pork figuring that since this is only my second usage of the rotisserie, I'd rather minimize my losses if I screw something up.

Think I'm gonna go with what euge said unless I get a crazy hair otherwise. 

Euge - by 'stud' did you mean insert cloves of garlic into the meat?  I've done that often before, just checking as I'm not familiar with that term. 
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 06, 2011, 02:25:40 AM
Yes. Insert.

Sounds good already. :D
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: tschmidlin on May 06, 2011, 06:39:34 AM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: bluesman on May 06, 2011, 11:41:26 AM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38

Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: gordonstrong on May 06, 2011, 11:55:12 AM
Pork loin is a great choice; that's what I would have recommended.  The cut of meat looks like it was designed for a rotisserie.  Maybe I'll do one of those.  I just wish I could get the kind of pork I got as a kid, before they had bred it to taste like chicken.

Alton Brown did an interesting episode on making gyros (I think) on the rotisserie.  Have to look that one up.

If you do the roast pork, think about making a fruit-based sauce to accompany it.  It really goes well with apples, onions, darker fruit (prunes), etc.  I got a bunch of rhubarb in the CSA box this week; I was thinking about making a rhubarb chutney.  It would go perfectly with pork loin.  Maybe I just like the word chutney.  Almost as much as spatchcock.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: phillamb168 on May 06, 2011, 11:56:03 AM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38

Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)

Woah holy crap! I've never seen this guy before, I just watched some videos, these are AWESOME!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: gordonstrong on May 06, 2011, 11:59:13 AM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38

Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)

Woah holy crap! I've never seen this guy before, I just watched some videos, these are AWESOME!

Dude, where have you been?  (I know, in France, in a kilt)  He's like everywhere.  Almost as bad as Bobby Flay.  Especially as it gets to grilling season.  You can't mention barbecue without him popping up.  Fortunately, he knows what he's talking about.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: phillamb168 on May 06, 2011, 12:05:24 PM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38

Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)

Woah holy crap! I've never seen this guy before, I just watched some videos, these are AWESOME!

Dude, where have you been?  (I know, in France, in a kilt)  He's like everywhere.  Almost as bad as Bobby Flay.  Especially as it gets to grilling season.  You can't mention barbecue without him popping up.  Fortunately, he knows what he's talking about.

Yeah - only PBS I can get out here is from video.pbs.org through a proxy. I REALLY miss This Old House. Although this guy doesn't seem quite as good as Alton Brown
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 01:11:04 PM
If you do the roast pork, think about making a fruit-based sauce to accompany it.  It really goes well with apples, onions, darker fruit (prunes), etc.  I got a bunch of rhubarb in the CSA box this week; I was thinking about making a rhubarb chutney.  It would go perfectly with pork loin.  Maybe I just like the word chutney.  Almost as much as spatchcock.

I'm right with you - I was thinking of making two - one with perhaps apricot or apples and then I have a recipe from a Giada book for a fig port reduction sauce that is incredible.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 01:12:24 PM
I remember a Raichlen show for German Spiessbraten, a stuffed pork loin.  It looked awesome.  He said it was traditional to spit it perpendicular to the rotisserie.  I don't see that in this recipe, but I would have bet he said it on the show.
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=160&EpisodeID=38

that's probably a different piece of equipment than I have - mine only goes paralell - but I'm pretty happy with trying out what I got - if I remember, I will try and take a picture or 2.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 06, 2011, 01:35:18 PM
Butterflying the boneless-loin is a nice idea if one is willing to tie it back up again. Which I am. ;) SR does not state how to spit the meat. For most rotisseries the spit will have to go the length of the meat not perpendicular to it.

The fruit sauce was weighing on my mind- how about a sweet apple jalapeño jelly?
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 01:55:58 PM
sweet apple jalapeño jelly?

recipe?
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 06, 2011, 02:37:34 PM
sweet apple jalapeño jelly?

recipe?

I was thinking store-bought but this looks like a good recipe: Apple Pepper Jelly (http://www.yummly.com/recipe/Apple-Pepper-Jelly-Recipezaar).
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: gordonstrong on May 06, 2011, 02:41:39 PM
I have a recipe from a Giada book for a fig port reduction sauce that is incredible.

You've made it?  Can you post it?  It sounds delicious.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 02:48:50 PM
I have a recipe from a Giada book for a fig port reduction sauce that is incredible.

You've made it?  Can you post it?  It sounds delicious.

sure - I've made it for pork loin roasts before and its unbelievable - everyone who's had it has asked for the recipe - this looks like its the same one:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/pork-loin-with-fig-and-port-sauce-recipe/index.html

Cheers!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 06, 2011, 02:53:01 PM
sweet apple jalapeño jelly?

recipe?

I was thinking store-bought but this looks like a good recipe: Apple Pepper Jelly (http://www.yummly.com/recipe/Apple-Pepper-Jelly-Recipezaar).

if i have time to make it on Sat, i might try that - otherwise, storebought it is! thanks.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: tschmidlin on May 06, 2011, 06:36:03 PM
Although this guy doesn't seem quite as good as Alton Brown
I really hope Steve's not reading this when I say he's kind of boring on his show.  His voice drones a bit.  But the recipes are consistently awesome, I did the grilled onions (http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=50&EpisodeID=9) last weekend and they were beautiful.

I can handle a bit of droning, it's better than a certain person whose name rhymes Crachel Cray who may have good recipes but I'll never know because she is super annoying and I can't watch.

SR does not state how to spit the meat. For most rotisseries the spit will have to go the length of the meat not perpendicular to it.
That's why it stuck in my head, it was such an unexpected way to spit it.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 09, 2011, 03:45:30 PM
well, went with the simple preparation - 18-20 cloves inserted into a 5.5lb pork roast, bone in, salt & pepper, fresh rosemary.  on the rotisserie for about 90-105min.  rested for 15. internal temp at about 165-170.

served with the above fig/port reduction, roasted sweet potato/onion/garlic mash, swiss chard and salad.  glass of lindemann's Pomme and then a few bohemian pils.

un. freaking. believable.

a few chops left over for dinner - drooling already!
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: gordonstrong on May 09, 2011, 03:58:10 PM
Pictures or it didn't happen.   ;)   Bone-in was interesting choice; it can be harder to get it cooked properly.  Extra points awarded for skill.

How did you prepare the Swiss chard?  It's one of my new favorite vegetables (thank you, CSA).
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: blatz on May 09, 2011, 04:12:05 PM
damn - forgot the pictures - sorry.  It was a bit difficult to judge the internal temp since the meat near the bone was obviously very hot and then you had to make sure to not hit the spit with the thermapen - just did my best.

It was a little hectic while cooking - we were trying to cram in some pool time while cooking the roast and I was a little off since I expected a full 2 hours for the roast so I blanked on grabbing the camera or even my phone  :(

for the swiss chard, my wife generally makes it so I'll confirm this was the way and post back if I was mistaken, but here's the general rundown:

remove the leaves from the hard stems, wash, rough chop.  dice a small onion (vidalia perfect here) and saute with a few minced cloves garlic in OO in skillet till onions are soft, then add chard, and wilt like you would spinach.  add a splash of balsamic just before you take off the burner.  S&P to taste.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: gordonstrong on May 09, 2011, 04:21:08 PM
remove the leaves from the hard stems, wash, rough chop.  dice a small onion (vidalia perfect here) and saute with a few minced cloves garlic in OO in skillet till onions are soft, then add chard, and wilt like you would spinach.  add a splash of balsamic just before you take off the burner.  S&P to taste.

Thanks.  I'll try that next time.  I normally do something similar, except I use bacon.  Cut bacon into lardons, crisp in pan, remove. Use bacon grease to wilt the greens, season, then toss in crisp bacon at end.  Works for just about any green, but the cook time will vary by the type of greens.

I had a dish at a Tapas restaurant in Oakland that was shredded chard (almost a chiffonade) cooked in butter with raisins and pine nuts.  Not sure of any other seasoning; that was based on what I could see and taste.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 09, 2011, 04:54:50 PM
Now I'm hungry...

Sounds like it worked out well. ;D
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 18, 2011, 06:42:37 PM
blatz and Gordon's post got me wanting to TRY Swiss Chard for the first time.

First I cooked two slices of bacon lardons in a SS skillet until crispy, then removed the bacon but kept most of the grease.
Then a bit of chopped onion until translucent, then some smashed roasted garlic until aromatic.
Then the greens until wilted, a little kosher and black pepper at this stage too.
Added some roasted pine nuts halfway through.
Splash of red wine vinegar towards the end.
Into a bowl and topped with the crispy lardons.

nom.
effing.
nom.

Thanks for the ideas...I'll be making this again...and again...and again...
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: euge on May 18, 2011, 07:36:00 PM
blatz and Gordon's post got me wanting to TRY Swiss Chard for the first time.

First I cooked two slices of bacon lardons in a SS skillet until crispy, then removed the bacon but kept most of the grease.
Then a bit of chopped onion until translucent, then some smashed roasted garlic until aromatic.
Then the greens until wilted, a little kosher and black pepper at this stage too.
Added some roasted pine nuts halfway through.
Splash of red wine vinegar towards the end.
Into a bowl and topped with the crispy lardons.

nom.
effing.
nom.

Thanks for the ideas...I'll be making this again...and again...and again...


That's good with almost any green. Try it with fresh spinach.
Title: Re: Rotisserie?
Post by: nicneufeld on May 18, 2011, 08:17:24 PM
Great recipe and show. Steve is a BBQ genius.  :)

Raichlen's shows are great, a bit repetitive if you've seen as many as I have (BBQ U went for what, four seasons?) but I credit the man for making me a halfway decent outdoor cook.  He's simple, not flashy, a great writer, and a great teacher.  I have a number of his books, which for me are/were very valuable.  The reissued BBQ Bible is a good resource particularly for those that like world cuisine...only a small percentage of it focuses on American BBQ.  Primal Grill is a good show but I actually prefer the slightly less "flashy" format of BBQ University...less dramatic cutaways, pounding music, and such like, it feels more like a guy giving you a cooking lesson.

That said, I have great fun reading double entendre into everything he says on his shows.  I can't think of many examples, but some of the things he says are basically handcrafted for "TWSS!"  Not least of which is his motto about keeping it hot, clean, and lubricated.