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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: SiameseMoose on May 16, 2011, 11:17:35 PM

Title: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: SiameseMoose on May 16, 2011, 11:17:35 PM
During the summer we put a hummingbird feeder on a bracket by our back windows. Today I was working in the yard on a hillside about 40' from the house. A hummingbird swooped around my head, and came to a hover right in front of me. After staying there a few seconds, he flew down to the house, right next to the empty bracket. He turned around and looked a me for a few seconds, then flew away. Message received! The feeder is now in place for the summer.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 16, 2011, 11:38:34 PM
That's awesome. :)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Malticulous on May 17, 2011, 12:08:44 AM
Once me an my wife were sitting on the front porch and I seen our cat climb up the walnut tree. This pretty little bright green bird flew out and landed right on my shoulder. My wife was like 'oh cute, I can't believe that it just perched right there.' Then it shat on me and flew away. Message revived  ???.

There are another couple of those same birds up there again this year. The tree climbing cat is gone. He got killed by a pit bull.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tom on May 17, 2011, 02:01:19 AM
Message received! The feeder is now in place for the summer.
You are trainable!
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2011, 02:32:04 AM
Wish I could have a feeder or two but my felines won't have it.  :(

Tried it once...and that was the last.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tumarkin on May 17, 2011, 03:02:45 AM
hummingbirds are awesome, beautiful, swift and terrible. they are among the most pugnacious, belligerant, feisty creatures on the planet. they'd wade right into a bfi fight thread and kick ass.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: jaybeerman on May 17, 2011, 04:00:48 AM
similar to my dog - when she glances at me and then looks to the top of the beer fridge where her snacks are kept.  she even darts her eyes in that direction while still looking at me.  Gotta love it when animals look at us and think, "I wonder if this dumbass is smart enough to follow my hint."
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: 1vertical on May 17, 2011, 05:46:10 AM
I once found one in the vast high dry mountain desert. It appeared to have
just plain ran out of gas...which I assume must be readily plentiful to fuel the speed
of living that they posess....I kept that mummified remnant just to show for a
while then set it free....true story.  :o
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: euge on May 17, 2011, 05:50:44 AM
Thanks guys. We got'em and I'll set out some sugar water next few days. Didn't know they could be aggressive. But it makes sense in a way.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Pinski on May 17, 2011, 06:07:26 AM
Oh yeah they're aggressive little buggers.  The ladies at my office have feeders all around the building and we have a really nice big garden so it's prime habitat. They get very territorial with each other, particularly in the spring. Now why would that be? Anyway, it like watching mini-dog fights out there sometimes. I even got buzzed once. I hope I never catch one of those to the ear.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 17, 2011, 06:18:27 AM
I've always thought that hummingbirds live life like the Scalosians in the Star Trek Episode, Wink of an Eye

Very cool story in the OP!

(not to mention Deela exhibits extreme babeage!)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: rabid_dingo on May 17, 2011, 06:27:56 AM
I once found one in the vast high dry mountain desert. It appeared to have
just plain ran out of gas...which I assume must be readily plentiful to fuel the speed
of living that they posess....I kept that mummified remnant just to show for a
while then set it free....true story.  :o

I believe it. We were up at Lake Granby in Colorado. Alpine withtout being to high maybe 7-8k feet
in altitude. Our host has a nice cabin up there. Huge windows.

Wham! They run into it a lot, and it is not just humming birds. Anyhoo, it was a little green iridescent one.
Pretty. Out of breath. We gave it some sugar water and hoped that it was ok.  It looked like it was done for.
Then out of nowhere pop. zip! and gone...
hummingbirds are awesome, beautiful, swift and terrible. they are among the most pugnacious, belligerant, feisty creatures on the planet. they'd wade right into a bfi fight thread and kick ass.
ROFLMAO!
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 17, 2011, 06:46:47 AM
hummingbirds are awesome, beautiful, swift and terrible. they are among the most pugnacious, belligerant, feisty creatures on the planet. they'd wade right into a bfi fight thread and kick ass.

;D

We get hummingbirds, it's pretty cool.  I saw a hairy woodpecker on the feeder the other day, that was awesome.

(http://sdakotabirds.com/species/photos/hairy_woodpecker_1.jpg)

My biggest problem right now is a psychotic robin.  It keeps flying in to the windows, attacking its own reflection.  The noise is annoying enough, but it smear dirt from it's feet all over the windows, front of the hose, back of the house, driver's side windows, passenger side windows, anywhere it can find a reflection.  Plus it craps all over wherever it happens to perch (and below) right before it launches it's next attack - porch railing and deck, car mirrors/doors, you name it.  I've deployed counter measures - they work a little.  I hate that damn bird.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: euge on May 17, 2011, 06:55:12 AM
I'm a bird person but .22...
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 17, 2011, 07:05:10 AM
Having spent a lot of time around many types of birds, I can tell you without a doubt that they have no awareness of their own ass holes.  Poop flies out whenever - where ever, without conscious effort or thought.

That said, I've only seen two hummingbirds in person in my entire life.  One was at Mount Vernon.  That was an extra special day.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 17, 2011, 07:13:01 AM
I'm a bird person but .22...

;D  Yes!

But no, I can't do it.  It's just following instinct and should stop as soon as nesting season is over. I think we just have more robins than usual this year so this one is a bit more territorial than normal.  It's never happened before, and it's our 4th spring in this house.

Having spent a lot of time around many types of birds, I can tell you without a doubt that they have no awareness of their own ass holes.  Poop flies out whenever - where ever, without conscious effort or thought.

That said, I've only seen two hummingbirds in person in my entire life.  One was at Mount Vernon.  That was an extra special day.
The quantity of poop is astounding!

Hummingbirds are cool to watch.  ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 17, 2011, 07:23:58 AM
I think we just have more robins than usual this year so this one is a bit more territorial than normal.  It's never happened before, and it's our 4th spring in this house.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjj32CavzU0

(Melanie Griffith's mom)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Mark G on May 17, 2011, 12:24:17 PM
We have a pair of robins that decided to build a nest on the back iron of our basketball hoop in the driveway. At first the wife and kids thought they were so cute to have built a nest there. Then even cuter when eggs appeared. Finally, babies hatched, and the cute factor was over the top. Now the babies are learning to fly, and under that basketball hoop is parked my truck. Well, last night I got in my truck to run to the store... Bird crap all over the windshield.  >:( More than I thought ever possible from such small creatures. Anybody have a .22 I can borrow?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Hokerer on May 17, 2011, 01:35:30 PM
We get hummingbirds, it's pretty cool.  I saw a hairy woodpecker on the feeder the other day, that was awesome.

Cool,

We get the red-bellied woodpeckers at our suet feeder

(http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/PHOTO/LARGE/red_bellied_woodpecker_2.jpg)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 17, 2011, 01:41:24 PM
I am thoroughly convinced that at least some the same hummingbirds return each year. Why else would the first hummingbirds, in late March, be hovering around the corner of our patio where the feeder was last year?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: SiameseMoose on May 17, 2011, 01:46:17 PM
We get boatloads of woodpeckers at our feeders. The largest number are downy, then red belly, flickers, hairy, and pileated, in that order. A couple of springs ago we had a pileated arrive at the feeder, leave and immediately return, and repeat for a few cycles. We realized that it was alternating male and female, and when we looked harder we saw them flying to a nearby tree and feeding a youngster, who looked to be every bit as big as his parents.
(http://www.lies.com/wp/images/pileated.jpg)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2011, 01:48:20 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 17, 2011, 01:56:08 PM
I have a dwarf poincinana that blooms during summer near a window right next to the TV.  After a rain the hummingbirds always come to visit that shrub and you can stand next to the window and have one go flower-to-flower, literally a couple of feet from your head.

The mockingbirds here in Florida are very aggressive.  If any other bird, no matter how big, gets near their nest they will pester the heck out of it.  You often see big buzzards getting pelted by two mockingbirds as it tries to fly away.

Out at Kennedy Space Center (where I work) we have Scrub Jays.  These guys are so 'tame' they will eat right from your hands.  I even had one dive-bomb me after I bought a bag of chips and had just opened the bag and pulled out the first chip.  He probably thought it was for him/her.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Hokerer on May 17, 2011, 01:57:16 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.

Not sure you did any favors there.  While I'm all for birds, those geese seem to be overrunning things and are basically just loud, obnoxious, "tootsie-roll" producers.  :)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 17, 2011, 02:02:19 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.

Not sure you did any favors there.  While I'm all for birds, those geese seem to be overrunning things and are basically just loud, obnoxious, "tootsie-roll" producers.  :)

You're lucky the geese didn't come after you and your wife. They can be very aggressive and outright mean.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 17, 2011, 02:03:11 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.

Not sure you did any favors there.  While I'm all for birds, those geese seem to be overrunning things and are basically just loud, obnoxious, "tootsie-roll" producers.  :)

You're lucky the geese didn't come after you and your wife. They can be very aggressive and outright mean.

They would have gotten a dose of pepper spray.  ;)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 17, 2011, 03:17:28 PM
Out at Kennedy Space Center (where I work) ...

Are you a member of SAAZ?

There are no mocking birds here.  I really miss them.  Especially in the early summer when the fledglings are learning to fly.  Pairs of them would zoom around my yard like fighter jets in a dogfight.  Talk about joie de vivre...

Da bluejays are da mean buggahs!  Always at war with squirrels.  You can hear them yelling at each other up in the oak trees all the time. 

No bluejays, squirrels, or oak trees here either.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 17, 2011, 04:12:53 PM
We occasionally get some pileated woodpeckers here too, and lots of flickers.  I've really enjoyed the grosbeaks, pictures rarely do justice to how brightly colored they are.  We've had a family or three visit or feeder the last couple of summers, sometimes as many as 9 or 10 at a time.

But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: SiameseMoose on May 17, 2011, 04:28:52 PM
We see one or two Grosbeaks a year, and never two at once. Our heavy populations are downy woodpeckers, all manners of finches, especially goldfinches, blue jays, and sparrows. We have a lot of mockingbirds around, but they don't come to the feeder. There is one mockingbird I've seen and heard for two years now. He's learned to copy the neighbor's phone, so when I work in the yard I occasionally hear a phone ringing in the woods.

We feed through the end of May. We used to end earlier, but we get a lot of fledglings this month so we now leave it up for the "Nature Babies" show.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 17, 2011, 04:34:43 PM
It's that pic-a-nic basket they're after Tom. ;)

punatic,
No, I'm not in SAAZ.  I live near Orlando and I'm in CFHB.  At work we get birds nests all up in the corners/beams/rafters of the open-sided structures.  Then at some point a dead baby bird on the ground that fell too far.  Once the 'flying lesson' starts, they learn really quickly.  But some don't survive those first few attempts.

Pro tip: don't try to pick up a baby bird that fell when trying to learn to fly.  Those things can be covered in mites (or something mite-like).
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: weazletoe on May 17, 2011, 04:38:01 PM
hummingbirds are awesome, beautiful, swift and terrible. they are among the most pugnacious, belligerant, feisty creatures on the planet. they'd wade right into a bfi fight thread and kick ass.

That might just be the funniest thing ever said on this board. I laughed. HARD.

 A few years ago, back in Ohio, I found a humming bird nest in a low branch of a pine tree in our yard. I watched it all spring. Saw the tiny eggs, three of them, and i mean tiny.....watched them hatch, and grow up and fly off. Once the nest was abondoned, we clipped the branch it was on, and framed it in a shadow box. My parents have it on their wall now with a picture shortly after the babies were hatched. We put a dime next to them for reference, and that thing looks huge next to those tiny little birds.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: 1vertical on May 17, 2011, 05:31:23 PM
There is one....a Hummingbird Nest Cam....
http://www.ustream.tv/hummingbirdnestcam (http://www.ustream.tv/hummingbirdnestcam)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: MrNate on May 17, 2011, 06:24:54 PM
My biggest problem right now is a psychotic robin.  It keeps flying in to the windows, attacking its own reflection.  The noise is annoying enough, but it smear dirt from it's feet all over the windows, front of the hose, back of the house, driver's side windows, passenger side windows, anywhere it can find a reflection.  Plus it craps all over wherever it happens to perch (and below) right before it launches it's next attack - porch railing and deck, car mirrors/doors, you name it.  I've deployed counter measures - they work a little.  I hate that damn bird.

I had the same problem right up until last week when the eggs hatched.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 17, 2011, 06:52:18 PM
We occasionally get some pileated woodpeckers here too, and lots of flickers.  I've really enjoyed the grosbeaks, pictures rarely do justice to how brightly colored they are.  We've had a family or three visit or feeder the last couple of summers, sometimes as many as 9 or 10 at a time.

But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Hummingbirds! 

Doooo eeee oooo ooooo!!!   ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: morticaixavier on May 19, 2011, 03:01:00 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.

how did you know they were canadian ehh?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 19, 2011, 06:45:12 PM
The wife and I took our dogs out for their daily walk over the weekend and we encountered two adult Canadian Geese along the way. As we approached them we noticed they were not flying away as they normally would. The dogs started running toward them yet they still didn't fly away until they had gotten right on their tails. We then noticed baby goslings tryting to run away. Thankfully I have my dogs trained to the point where they didn't instinctively snatch the baby goslings up. A close call but we allowed the goslings to get away unharmed.

how did you know they were canadian ehh?

Because the goslings were saying...EHHH-ehh, EHHH-ehh.  ;D

They looked just like...

(http://www.hickerphoto.com/data/media/40/canadian-geese-family_37693.jpg)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 19, 2011, 06:51:07 PM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 19, 2011, 07:33:41 PM
Not all geese that look like that come from Canada

(http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/classes/hawaii/photos/baby_nene1.jpg)
Hawaiian Nene
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 20, 2011, 01:57:27 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 20, 2011, 03:22:12 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D

Doesn't matter if it's right, he's being paid by denny. :D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 20, 2011, 05:36:11 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D

Doesn't matter if it's right, he's being paid by denny. :D

Sounds like a sweet gig to me!   ;)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 20, 2011, 06:17:12 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D
What's to argue?  They're called Canada Geese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Goose), I didn't come up with it.  I was just explaining (I think) morticaixavier's point.  Call them whatever you want though, I don't mind.  Just don't call them wet geese. ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 20, 2011, 06:18:10 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D

Doesn't matter if it's right, he's being paid by denny. :D

Sounds like a sweet gig to me!   ;)
He pays me in boomers. ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 20, 2011, 11:27:38 AM
I'm pretty sure those goslings are Delawarean Geese then Ron, not Canadian.  Delawarean Canada Geese.  Hard to say where the parents are from.

(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

We could probably argue this until the cows come home. Didn't you get enough from ccarlson and the hydrogen in a gallon of water Tom.  ;D
What's to argue?  They're called Canada Geese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Goose), I didn't come up with it.  I was just explaining (I think) morticaixavier's point.  Call them whatever you want though, I don't mind.  Just don't call them wet geese. ;D

Tom...you're alright. I don't care what Denny says about you.  ;) :-* ;D
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: dbarber on May 20, 2011, 12:56:48 PM


(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

This was one of my pet peeves when I taught my field ornithology class.  Sadly, most of the students never quite got it.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 20, 2011, 01:07:55 PM
I never really thought about it and have called them Canadian geese for years. They don't have a nationality, so Canada geese would be correct. However, Canadian sure does sound better.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 20, 2011, 01:31:27 PM
Perhaps they are of Canadian Heritage.  :)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 20, 2011, 01:45:09 PM
Perhaps they are of Canadian Heritage.  :)

I once had one tell he he was "aboot" to bite me, if that means anything.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 20, 2011, 04:42:48 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Slowbrew on May 20, 2011, 05:01:00 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)

I've heard they taste just like chicken.  8^)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: gmac on May 20, 2011, 05:08:34 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)

And just how many Canadians have you tasted Tom in order to make that comparison? 

Canada Geese but more commonly called Sky Rats here.  Stupid things are everywhere.  Green tootsie rolls on every golf course, park and lawn near water.

Had the robin problem last year too.  Not that sentimental so I ended it quickly and with extreme prejudice.  We are not hurting for robins here either. 

Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 20, 2011, 05:11:07 PM
Okay, so is it Canadian Bacon or Canada Bacon?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: gmac on May 20, 2011, 05:12:14 PM
Here we just call it bacon.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 20, 2011, 05:23:44 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)

And just how many Canadians have you tasted Tom in order to make that comparison? 
More than one.  That's as far as I'm going.   :)

Mmmmm, bacon.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: bluesman on May 20, 2011, 06:42:02 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)

And just how many Canadians have you tasted Tom in order to make that comparison? 
More than one.  That's as far as I'm going.   :)

Mmmmm, bacon.


 ;D

You devil you.  ;)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: maxieboy on May 20, 2011, 09:14:25 PM
They taste Canadian too. :)

I've heard they taste just like chicken.  8^)

Nooo, you're thinking of bald eagle.  :D  Canada goose is delish, marinate the breast and grill med. rare. Yum.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: rabid_dingo on May 21, 2011, 01:40:27 AM
Here we just call it bacon.


I thought you called it ham...
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: rabid_dingo on May 21, 2011, 01:40:52 AM
They taste Canadian too. :)

Like poutine?!?!?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: gmac on May 21, 2011, 05:25:08 AM
I feel I need to take this opportunity to explain "Canadian" bacon.  
Here in Canada, we don't call it Canadian bacon, but rather "Back" bacon.  It is the pork loin that has been brined and smoked as you would with regular bacon which of course, comes from the belly of the pig rather than the back.  
If you watch Strange Brew (and you should) you'll hear Bob say the following during the court scene..."I'll have a toasted back bacon...hold the toast".  
So, "Canadian" bacon is back bacon (not ham which is from the leg rather than the strip loin).
Bacon comes from the belly regardless of where you live.
Turkey bacon is an abomination before God which should be outlawed.
That concludes today's Bacon class.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 21, 2011, 06:14:40 AM
Bacon comes from the belly regardless of where you live.
Bacon in Ireland and the UK is back bacon, but not quite the same as in Canada.  It's pork loin but with an extra bit on it.  If you want belly bacon in Ireland/UK, you need to ask for streaky bacon.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: gmac on May 21, 2011, 03:52:22 PM
Bacon comes from the belly regardless of where you live.
Bacon in Ireland and the UK is back bacon, but not quite the same as in Canada.  It's pork loin but with an extra bit on it.  If you want belly bacon in Ireland/UK, you need to ask for streaky bacon.
I stand corrected.  I wasn't thinking off-continent. 
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: Steve on May 22, 2011, 04:13:19 PM


(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

This was one of my pet peeves when I taught my field ornithology class.  Sadly, most of the students never quite got it.

If I were north of the US border and someone there were to grab me between my butt cheeks and squeeze hard several times, would that be a Canada Geese or Canadian Gooses?
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 22, 2011, 07:27:47 PM


(They're not Canadian Geese, they're Canada Geese).

This was one of my pet peeves when I taught my field ornithology class.  Sadly, most of the students never quite got it.

If I were north of the US border and someone there were to grab me between my butt cheeks and squeeze hard several times, would that be a Canada Geese or Canadian Gooses?

I think that depends on whether you enjoyed it or not.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: thomasbarnes on May 24, 2011, 08:36:13 AM
Canada Geese but more commonly called Sky Rats here.  Stupid things are everywhere.  Green tootsie rolls on every golf course, park and lawn near water.

And the problem is that since they're technically "migratory waterfowl" they're under state and federal protection, so its difficult for property owners or local authorities to do anything about them. In more temperate climates, the only way the damn things will actually migrate is if you buy them a 1st class plane ticket to Miami.[/quote]
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: thomasbarnes on May 24, 2011, 08:39:52 AM
If you watch Strange Brew (and you should) you'll hear Bob say the following during the court scene..."I'll have a toasted back bacon...hold the toast".

And, if you've ever seen their Great White North skits on SCTV, you'll notice that they have a little grill on the coffee table, just for grilling back bacon. Pretty smart, eh? Almost as smart as raising baby mice inside beer bottles.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: gmac on May 24, 2011, 03:47:40 PM
Canada Geese but more commonly called Sky Rats here.  Stupid things are everywhere.  Green tootsie rolls on every golf course, park and lawn near water.

And the problem is that since they're technically "migratory waterfowl" they're under state and federal protection, so its difficult for property owners or local authorities to do anything about them. In more temperate climates, the only way the damn things will actually migrate is if you buy them a 1st class plane ticket to Miami.
[/quote]

What they do here is spray the eggs with mineral oil.  If you break them, they'll lay more but if you spray them with oil, the egg will sufficate and won't hatch and they'll still sit on them without laying new ones.  Personally, I think they should do a cull and donate the meat to food banks etc but most people think I'm cold-hearted.  Plus, people probably wouldn't eat them.  I do, taste like goose.
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2011, 04:11:09 PM
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .
 (http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/east_king/red/news/122244139.html)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: ccarlson on May 24, 2011, 04:24:52 PM
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .
 (http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/east_king/red/news/122244139.html)

I initially misread Bothell as Brothel and I imagined a bunch of naked people running out of a house with a black bear behind them. :)
Title: Re: Hummingbirds are smart critters
Post by: punatic on May 24, 2011, 04:33:48 PM
But it's time to put the feeder away.  Last night the dog went crazy around 2:30 AM.  We didn't see anything, but this morning I noticed the bottom was ripped off the feeder and the wrought-iron pole is bent about 15 degrees.  I think the dog scared it off before it was finished, but the only thing I can think of that can and would do that is a bear.  They've been seen in our neighborhood before, but never in our yard.  I figured the smell of the dog would keep them away, but the smell of the sunflower seeds was more attractive I guess.
I meant to post a followup . . . I don't know if this was the same bear (or if we even had a bear, since I never saw it) but this article appeared in the local free paper.  As a point of reference, it was 2:30 AM Tuesday when the dog woke us up.

Black bear's eventful Eastside journey ends in Bothell

A bear's eventful journey through Eastside cities ended in Bothell Wednesday night.
The young black bear, first spotted in Redmond Tuesday morning . . .
 (http://www.pnwlocalnews.com/east_king/red/news/122244139.html)

How did it end; when the bear found a Canada goose eating back bacon?

Ka loo koo koo koo koo koo koooo,
Ka loo koo koo koo koo koo koooooo!