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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: gymrat on May 22, 2011, 01:51:24 AM

Title: Spent grain
Post by: gymrat on May 22, 2011, 01:51:24 AM
What do you all do with your spent grain?
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 22, 2011, 02:09:37 AM
Into the compost pile it goes! Make sure it's mixed in well or there will be flies!
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: chezteth on May 22, 2011, 03:38:41 AM
Into the compost pile it goes! Make sure it's mixed in well or there will be flies!

+1 same here.  If you leave it sit on top of the compost pile it will get quite smelly after a couple of days too.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: morticaixavier on May 22, 2011, 03:41:46 AM
I always fill a gallon zip lock which goes in the freezer for using in bread, the rest I either feed to the neighborhood chickens (well my friends neighborhood chickens) or compost. and Yes stir that compost
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: oscarvan on May 22, 2011, 04:12:13 AM
There's a dude down the street who has a traveling petting zoo.... so my grain feeds llamas, goats, a few ponies and an ass.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: mxstar21 on May 22, 2011, 04:25:01 AM
I've made bread with mine that was pretty good.  This month in" Brew Your Own" magazine has some recipes for pizza dough, cinnamon rolls, and dog treats.  I have a recipe somewhere for energy bars as well, just haven't tried to make them yet.  Hope to do the pizza dough and cinnamon rolls with my next batch.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Hokerer on May 22, 2011, 03:04:42 PM
Onto the compost pile here
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: astrivian on May 22, 2011, 04:12:57 PM
+1 on the compost

Before and after the growing season i just spread it really thin on the garden soil and let it dry. Then i mix it into the soil every so often. Great for the ground.

Also, if you grow beer related stuff in the garden (corriander, hops, herbs and spices) you have a complete beer cycle going on!  ;)
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: billn on May 22, 2011, 07:24:28 PM
I have a local farmer who feeds it to their chickens.  They come pick it up and all I have to do is leave it out by my garage.  One less thing to deal with on brew day ;D
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 22, 2011, 07:26:01 PM
I compost the spent grain and the hops.  Next year maybe I'll have some chickens to feed some to.  Someone nearby has goats, they might take some but I don't know them and have never asked.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: violaleebrews on May 23, 2011, 01:05:19 AM
+1 for composting, and echoing "euge" and "chezteth" reminding you to mix it well and somewhat often to avoid flies and RANK smells.  i didn't know any better last year.  this year my compost smells really good... err... for a compost.

when my compst gets too full i have others who take it for their compost or to feed goats
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 23, 2011, 01:46:49 AM
brew day dinner bread!
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: dano14041 on May 23, 2011, 02:24:18 AM
Is there a preferred style for bread?
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 23, 2011, 02:45:21 AM
We've used it for in wheat, honey wheat and French. Adds nice texture and aroma. I'd say my favorite was the honey wheat. I took some into work and folks scarfed it down happily.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: a10t2 on May 23, 2011, 03:07:16 AM
This month in" Brew Your Own" magazine has some recipes for pizza dough, cinnamon rolls, and dog treats.

It's in Zymurgy, actually. This being the AHA forum and all. ;)

I make bread with it, but that only takes up about 2 cups per brewday. The rest gets thrown away or (now) composted.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: astrivian on May 23, 2011, 03:23:22 AM
With regards to the bread. Do you just add the spent grains "as is" or do you have to mash or grind them more?

Also, does the flavor of the grain come through in the bread? If so maybe a pumpernickel with special b would be awesome.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 23, 2011, 04:29:50 AM
With regards to the bread. Do you just add the spent grains "as is" or do you have to mash or grind them more?

Also, does the flavor of the grain come through in the bread? If so maybe a pumpernickel with special b would be awesome.

We just add them "as is".  I would say the flavor is subtle and more noticeable with specialty grains.  Don't go overboard as the hulls can get to be a bit prickly. 
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: morticaixavier on May 23, 2011, 05:18:25 AM
There's a dude down the street who has a traveling petting zoo.... so my grain feeds llamas, goats, a few ponies and an ass.

Don't be so hard on yourself Oscar. It's not your fault, pilots are just that way. It's all the responsibility. Like surgeons. ;)
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: mxstar21 on May 23, 2011, 06:15:43 AM
This month in" Brew Your Own" magazine has some recipes for pizza dough, cinnamon rolls, and dog treats.

It's in Zymurgy, actually. This being the AHA forum and all. ;)

I make bread with it, but that only takes up about 2 cups per brewday. The rest gets thrown away or (now) composted.

Haa!   Thanks for correcting me!  It was my first issue of Zymurgy, and I have had a subscription to BYO for awhile.  I am a moron!!!!
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: micsager on May 23, 2011, 03:02:40 PM
If you put an add on Craigslist, folks would be happy to take it away for you.  I have buckets from three different local farmers and I rotate who gets the grain.  And, I get free eggs from two of them.........

They tell me that you shouldn't feed chickens more than 25% spent grain though.  I don't know why or even if that's true. 
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Slowbrew on May 23, 2011, 06:18:17 PM
I've started just spreading it across the lawn.  Throwing it out in wide arcs with my brewing spoon.  It seems to breakdown into the soil pretty quickly, doesn't smell and it's fun to watch the birds and squirrels try to find it all back.

I used to spread it on the veggie garden and then turn it in but I no longer have a garden.

Paul
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: astrivian on May 24, 2011, 03:50:37 AM
Speaking of composting: Is spent grain considered "green" or "brown"?
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 24, 2011, 05:26:10 AM
Speaking of composting: Is spent grain considered "green" or "brown"?

Brown.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2011, 05:30:35 AM
Are you sure euge?  I thought it was green. :-\
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 24, 2011, 05:56:10 AM
Yeah I'm sure. But for asking's sake why would it be green?
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 24, 2011, 07:03:22 AM
Isn't it a chlorophyll kinda thing... or lack thereof? 
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 24, 2011, 07:08:57 AM
Isn't it a chlorophyll kinda thing... or lack thereof? 

Yeah. That's how I understand it. Compost only needs about 10% green. Not sure about wet stuff from the kitchen. That might be green but spent grain is brown. I've composted enough to tell the difference.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 24, 2011, 07:22:24 AM
I have yet to use spent grain in my compost blend, but I'm optimistic that a nice blend of grain, kitchen slop, grass clippins and leaves will yield some prime garden food with good texture.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2011, 07:48:28 AM
Yeah I'm sure. But for asking's sake why would it be green?
Because it has nothing to do with chlorophyll.  Greens have high nitrogen content, browns have high carbon content.  We wash a lot of the carbon out as sugars, so it ends up with higher than normal nitrogen content.  So it's green. ;)

Many people mistakenly believe that it is a source of carbon, a “brown” material. Because the carbohydrates in the grain are removed for use in the brewing process, the spent grain has a higher concentration of nitrogen (proteins) than does unprocessed grain. (https://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications-db/catalog/anr/HGA-01026.pdf)
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 24, 2011, 09:24:04 AM
Blah. It makes good compost regardless.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2011, 03:51:33 PM
Blah. It makes good compost regardless.
;D
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: Pinski on May 24, 2011, 04:43:21 PM
Yeah I'm sure. But for asking's sake why would it be green?
Because it has nothing to do with chlorophyll.  Greens have high nitrogen content, browns have high carbon content.  We wash a lot of the carbon out as sugars, so it ends up with higher than normal nitrogen content.  So it's green. ;)

Many people mistakenly believe that it is a source of carbon, a “brown” material. Because the carbohydrates in the grain are removed for use in the brewing process, the spent grain has a higher concentration of nitrogen (proteins) than does unprocessed grain. (https://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications-db/catalog/anr/HGA-01026.pdf)

I tought that the presence of chlorophyll gives the green color that is generally an indicator of higher nitrogen content and that as decoposition progresses the color fades to brown and you're left with greater carbon ratio. 

Blah is right. It all turns to dirt eventually. 
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: bluesman on May 24, 2011, 04:47:40 PM
I haul the grains out behind my house into a compost pile. They eventually will make it into the garden.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 24, 2011, 05:04:12 PM
Yeah I'm sure. But for asking's sake why would it be green?
Because it has nothing to do with chlorophyll.  Greens have high nitrogen content, browns have high carbon content.  We wash a lot of the carbon out as sugars, so it ends up with higher than normal nitrogen content.  So it's green. ;)

Many people mistakenly believe that it is a source of carbon, a “brown” material. Because the carbohydrates in the grain are removed for use in the brewing process, the spent grain has a higher concentration of nitrogen (proteins) than does unprocessed grain. (https://www.uaf.edu/ces/publications-db/catalog/anr/HGA-01026.pdf)

I tought that the presence of chlorophyll gives the green color that is generally an indicator of higher nitrogen content and that as decoposition progresses the color fades to brown and you're left with greater carbon ratio. 
I only know what I've read.  Chlorophyll might be an indicator of higher nitrogen content, but clearly it is not foolproof and probably not the best way to determine whether something is green or brown.  Google works though. :)
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: ccarlson on May 24, 2011, 05:10:16 PM
I don't care what color it is, I just know that if you pile it real high, rather than spread it out, it will stink like $hit in a few days.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: kramerog on May 24, 2011, 05:17:20 PM
Mulch.  It really is a good weedblock at least initially because it the grains cement together.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: hubie on May 26, 2011, 10:53:41 PM
The first time I dumped it on the compost pile and didn't stir it in, the dog later jumped into the pile and ate it all.  I didn't actually see him eat it, but I won't go into how I knew he did ....
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: ibru on May 27, 2011, 02:23:21 PM
I spread my spent grain out in the field next outside the 'cave. I see rabbits, quail and my neighbors "free range chickens" eat it. I guess it makes up for a couple that flew into my yard that the dogs got (they are bird dogs). Anyway, it's gone in a couple days. I told the chicken guy he could have it but he always seems to be busy on brew day. After a few days in the buckets, it can really stink...
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: idris_arslanian on May 27, 2011, 02:24:55 PM
Oooh, I'm in process of building a chicken coop for the three birds we've got in our basement brooder.  If I could feed them spent grains, that would be awesome.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: ccarlson on May 27, 2011, 07:40:22 PM
I have a hard time composting it. I mix it with kitchen scraps, but inevitably it forms large clumps, I use a modified black barrel that I use to tumble everything and I only put it in after it has dried on the ground for a while. Not sure what causes it but the clumps eventually dry and are like rocks. Not very good mulch.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: euge on May 28, 2011, 04:22:26 AM
My compost moves. The back portion of my backyard has some low spots that have been home to several piles. You should see the grass where the compost had been.  :o


Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: tschmidlin on May 28, 2011, 04:25:16 AM
I've got to say, the grains from the 20 gallons I did last weekend REEK!!!

I stirred it and worked in some shredded newspaper tonight, I think I can still smell it on my clothes.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: johnf on May 28, 2011, 06:49:20 AM
If you put an add on Craigslist, folks would be happy to take it away for you.  I have buckets from three different local farmers and I rotate who gets the grain.  And, I get free eggs from two of them.........

They tell me that you shouldn't feed chickens more than 25% spent grain though.  I don't know why or even if that's true. 

True for all animals. Spent grains are nutrionally poor (much of the nutrition is in the beer) bit many animals will eat them exclusively given the choice as they are sweet.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: gymrat on May 28, 2011, 03:07:15 PM
Aren't they a good source of fiber?
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: astrivian on May 29, 2011, 01:59:47 PM
Here's another idea. Dry out some of the grains then mix them with melted wax to create a fire log. great for camping.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: mxstar21 on May 30, 2011, 04:56:13 AM
I made the cinnamon rolls today, and they were pretty good.  Making the pizza right now.
Title: Re: Spent grain
Post by: theoman on May 30, 2011, 11:35:36 AM
I usually spread mine out in the uncultivated bit of my in-law's yard. One time (and only one time) I put the mash tun in the garage and forgot about it for about a week. I thought someone died in the garage.