Homebrewers Association | AHA Forum

Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: denny on May 31, 2011, 04:56:17 PM

Title: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 04:56:17 PM
I heard a story about this on NPR this AM.  Used to haul the space shuttle to the launch pad, it's the largest vehicle in the world.  Top speed is 2 mph, although they never go over .8 mph while hauling the shuttle.  Gets an impressive 32 ft./gal.!

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/facilities/crawler.html
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: Mark G on May 31, 2011, 05:02:10 PM
32 ft/gal? Is that the hybrid version?
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 31, 2011, 05:10:35 PM
It's a big honkin tractor!

My company has cleaned many of the lines on the MLP (mobile launch platform, a part of the entire crawler structure) over the years.  Some cleaned in-place and others at our facility.  As you can imagine, it's waaayyyy easier to clean the lines in-place than to disassemble/remove/clean/reinstall.  Here's a really nice picture taken a few months ago:
(http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/mtbucket_2006/STS-133-rollout_9-20-10_tanner_8146.jpg)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 05:15:48 PM
COOL pic!
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: EHall on May 31, 2011, 05:46:29 PM
I wonder if they break really hard if the shuttle would topple over....I dont see any tie downs...
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 05:52:58 PM
In an interview with one of the 6 guys qualified to drive it, he said they always celebrate a successful trip with chips and salsa.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on May 31, 2011, 05:58:43 PM
In an interview with one of the 6 guys qualified to drive it, he said they always celebrate a successful trip with chips and salsa.
wat!  No beer? ;D
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 06:02:51 PM
In an interview with one of the 6 guys qualified to drive it, he said they always celebrate a successful trip with chips and salsa.
wat!  No beer? ;D

They asked him if they were going to celebrate with champagne since this is the last trip.  He acted like he was offended to be asked and kept saying "No, chips and salsa".
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: Hokerer on May 31, 2011, 06:13:02 PM
They were used way back when to move the Saturn V (among others) which absolutely dwarfs the shuttle.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: Kit B on May 31, 2011, 06:21:50 PM
They asked him if they were going to celebrate with champagne since this is the last trip.  He acted like he was offended to be asked and kept saying "No, chips and salsa".

I wonder is those are the stage names of the "entertainers" with which they celebrate.

(Insert rimshot, here.)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: richardt on May 31, 2011, 06:35:47 PM
Huge.  I remember seeing it on "Dirty Jobs with Mike Rowe;" the "Bridge Painter" Episode (Season 3, Episode 14).
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: ccarlson on May 31, 2011, 06:45:55 PM
I'll bet it's driven by a little old, gray haired, lady. The same one I get behind every time I'm on 2 lane road.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on May 31, 2011, 08:03:00 PM
The roadway the crawler drives on from the VAB to the pad is made of river rocks.  I have a piece of one of those rocks (crushed by Challenger's rollout for mission STS-41C on it's way to Pad 39A) on my desk in front of me.

I collect rocks from places I visit.  This particular rock is one of my most prized.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: dannyjed on May 31, 2011, 08:07:43 PM
I wonder if it has automatic parallel parking?
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: hopfenundmalz on May 31, 2011, 08:28:28 PM
Years ago one of the car magazines had an article on the transporter.  I remember that it was powered by a couple of ALCO locomotive Diesel engines. 
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: weazletoe on May 31, 2011, 09:11:59 PM
Been working in near 100* heat today.......I thoughrt this was a thread about NASCAR.  :-\
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on May 31, 2011, 09:45:59 PM
I thoughrt this was a thread about NASCAR.  :-\

Not from me, buddy!
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: weazletoe on May 31, 2011, 10:38:20 PM
Glad to hear that. I was really relieved when I realized it wasn't.  ;D
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: maxieboy on May 31, 2011, 11:03:01 PM
I thoughrt this was a thread about NASCAR.  :-\

Not from me, buddy!

Glad to hear that. I was really relieved when I realized it wasn't.  ;D

Downright un-American...  ;)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: gmac on June 01, 2011, 12:21:44 AM
Been working in near 100* heat today.......I thoughrt this was a thread about NASCAR.  :-\
I know how you feel.  I was really disappointed on the weekend when "Homemade Soup" turned out to be "Homemade Soap".  Mis-reading a thread is a huge let-down.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: 1vertical on June 01, 2011, 04:55:05 AM
I collect rocks from places I visit.  This particular rock is one of my most prized.
We should work out a trade....any whyomin rocks you might like to have...I like that
peridotite and it's cousins the pyrope.... ;)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: ccarlson on June 01, 2011, 11:27:18 AM
I have a hard rock shot glass.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: 1vertical on June 01, 2011, 12:39:17 PM
I have a hard rock shot glass.
I have some  natural nephrite slicks...
Edit: with respect to the OP any further rock discussion  should occur in PM mode....thx
sorry denny did not mean to side track.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: ccarlson on June 01, 2011, 01:01:10 PM
The space shuttle rocks.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: akr71 on June 01, 2011, 02:17:22 PM
I'll bet it's driven by a little old, gray haired, lady. The same one I get behind every time I'm on 2 lane road.

What gave it away, the left turn signal flashing?  :D
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on June 01, 2011, 02:51:35 PM
I'll bet it's driven by a little old, gray haired, lady. The same one I get behind every time I'm on 2 lane road.

What gave it away, the left turn signal flashing?  :D
Blue hair and white knuckles. ;D

Actually, rocks are quite on-topic when talking about the crawler.  The path for the crawler is made with imported rocks from Alabama/Tennessee river beds.  Allegedly there is less friction and less potential for sparks.

Quote
KSC Employee Update:
Overnight Success! Endeavour Glides Home, Atlantis Reaches Launch Pad
 
Space shuttle Endeavour sailed to Earth for the final time on Runway 15 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility overnight. Main gear touchdown was at 2:34:51 a.m., followed by nose gear touchdown at 2:35:04 a.m., and wheelstop at 2:35:36 a.m. This was the 24th night landing for the Space Shuttle Program.
 
On board were STS-134 Commander Mark Kelly, Pilot Greg H. Johnson, and Mission Specialists Mike Fincke, Drew Feustel, Greg Chamitoff and the European Space Agency's Roberto Vittori. The mission delivered the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS) and the Express Logistics Carrier-3 (ELC-3) to the International Space Station. AMS will help researchers understand the origin of the universe and search for evidence of dark matter, strange matter and antimatter from the station. ELC-3 carried spare parts that will sustain station operations once the shuttles are retired from service.
 
STS-134 was the 25th and final flight for Endeavour, which spent 299 days in space, orbited Earth 4,671 times and traveled 122,883,151 miles. Endeavour began its career in May 1992 and its accomplishments include embarking on the first servicing mission to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the first construction flight for the International Space Station.
 
To view Endeavour's final return to Earth, go to NASA's Video Gallery. Photos of landing will be posted throughout the day in KSC's Media Gallery.
 
(http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/mtbucket_2006/AtlantisFinal.jpg)
 
Just before sunrise, space shuttle Atlantis is seen on Launch Pad 39A, where it will await the final launch of NASA's Space Shuttle Program.
 
Space shuttle Atlantis completed its final planned rollout from KSC's Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A overnight. The 3.4-mile trek began at 8:42 p.m. yesterday and wrapped up at 3:29 a.m. today.
 
The four-member STS-135 crew, along with thousands of employees, their families and friends, gathered to watch the historic journey. The milestone move paves the way for the STS-135 launch to the International Space Station, targeted for July 8.
 
STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program.
 
To view more photos of rollout, visit KSC's Media Gallery. Stay up-to-date on all the processing milestones of Atlantis at www.nasa.gov/shuttle.

And here's another cool pic of Endeavour's final launch with an F-15:

(http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n4/mtbucket_2006/F15Shuttle.jpg)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: ccarlson on June 01, 2011, 04:12:03 PM
I'll bet it's driven by a little old, gray haired, lady. The same one I get behind every time I'm on 2 lane road.

What gave it away, the left turn signal flashing?  :D

I can't see the driver's head. :D
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 01, 2011, 05:09:30 PM
I can't even begin to describe the disappointment I feel because the shuttle program is coming to an end - with nothing waiting in the wings.  We finally orbit a space station - the very reason to have a space shuttle - and cancel the shuttle program.   ???
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on June 01, 2011, 05:31:30 PM
I can't even begin to describe the disappointment I feel because the shuttle program is coming to an end - with nothing waiting in the wings.  We finally orbit a space station - the very reason to have a space shuttle - and cancel the shuttle program.   ???

I feel the same way.  After growing up in the 50s when science was the thing it's sad to see that our quest for knowledge has taken a back seat.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 02, 2011, 05:03:26 AM
Been working in near 100* heat today.......I thoughrt this was a thread about NASCAR.  :-\

Close weaze, but that track lies 48 miles to the northwest.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: dbeechum on June 02, 2011, 03:54:51 PM
Being a transplanted Florida nerd, I can't tell you how disheartening it was in the 80's to watch NASA's budget constantly get dorked with like a political football by both parties.

The space station was a perfect example. They'd have a budget for it, have a plan, the budget would get cut, they'd have to delay and replan. Time and time again. Of course, the damn thing ended up costing a ton more because of this and the pols would point ot that the thing was oodles and boodles of dollars over the line. *Sigh*

When you combine that with the public's perception that NASA gets too much money cause they think it receives a whopping ~24% of the federal budget. (For reference, the DOD receives ~21%). No wonder this sort of stuff happens. Ugh.

I want my badass science and feeling of "woo, I can't believe we did that!"
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: denny on June 02, 2011, 05:35:39 PM
I want my badass science and feeling of "woo, I can't believe we did that!"

Yep!  Knowledge for the sake of knowledge.  Some say we can't afford it.  I say we can't afford NOT to do it!
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: Slowbrew on June 02, 2011, 06:20:41 PM
I want my badass science and feeling of "woo, I can't believe we did that!"

Yep!  Knowledge for the sake of knowledge.  Some say we can't afford it.  I say we can't afford NOT to do it!

Too true Denny.  Without science being done for the sake of science being done, we would not have the computer, the internet, TV, radio, MP3s and MP3 players or beer forums.  Just to name a few.

NASA has gotten yanked around and that really upsets me but the US is still the leader in pure science, despite what the lame stream media tells us.  It just happens in corporate labs or corporate funded university research centers now.  Someday we will mass produce things here in the States again but that's another discussion.

I believe it really is time for private industry to take over space launch capability because NASA will never be able to produce a cost effective solution.  Their work is to produce cutting edge work.  Cutting edge is really expensive.  They've gotten into space and made it fairly routine so their next target is further out.  Private industry will make it cheaper, faster and more reliable.

Paul
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: morticaixavier on June 02, 2011, 07:56:45 PM
I want my badass science and feeling of "woo, I can't believe we did that!"

Yep!  Knowledge for the sake of knowledge.  Some say we can't afford it.  I say we can't afford NOT to do it!

Too true Denny.  Without science being done for the sake of science being done, we would not have the computer, the internet, TV, radio, MP3s and MP3 players or beer forums.  Just to name a few.

NASA has gotten yanked around and that really upsets me but the US is still the leader in pure science, despite what the lame stream media tells us.  It just happens in corporate labs or corporate funded university research centers now.  Someday we will mass produce things here in the States again but that's another discussion.

I believe it really is time for private industry to take over space launch capability because NASA will never be able to produce a cost effective solution.  Their work is to produce cutting edge work.  Cutting edge is really expensive.  They've gotten into space and made it fairly routine so their next target is further out.  Private industry will make it cheaper, faster and more reliable.

Paul

Paul, Good point about cutting edge stuff. I would be nervous to get on a corporate designed, built and operated space craft but It would be nice to have the opportunity to be nervous about it.

I want to see a person on Mars. I know they probably wouldn't be able to survive a return trip what with cosmic radiation and all but there must be someone willing.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 02, 2011, 08:03:29 PM
Where are you from in Florida Drew?

I saw the headline for this and thought TFW? (Yoda speak).  Then I read the article and think Jack Schmitt makes a good point.

http://politics.blogs.foxnews.com/2011/05/28/former-astronaut-and-senator-wants-dismantle-nasa
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: tschmidlin on June 02, 2011, 08:22:49 PM
NASA has gotten yanked around and that really upsets me but the US is still the leader in pure science, despite what the lame stream media tells us.  It just happens in corporate labs or corporate funded university research centers now.  Someday we will mass produce things here in the States again but that's another discussion.
I mostly agree with your sentiments, but it's not so rosy as far as being the leader in pure science.  We're still ahead, but the gap is narrowing.  Corporate labs and corporate funding generally don't support basic research for the sake of learning, they do it to make money.  There's nothing inherently wrong with that, but we still need to do research that has no obvious way to ever make any money, because that's how the major advances get made down the road - the groundwork has already been laid.  Much of that corporate research is considered a trade secret and is never published too, so rather than make it available for everyone to learn, we have other labs doing the same research and wasting time and resources.

Our students are falling behind in science, and if our research programs are still superior it is partly because many of the best and brightest from around the world come here to study.  Even a lot of our research is being outsourced to other countries, I know the head of a non-academic research facility in the US who also maintains a lab in China because he can get well trained scientists to do the research and China pays for it. :-\
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 02, 2011, 08:30:51 PM

When you combine that with the public's perception that NASA gets too much money cause they think it receives a whopping ~24% of the federal budget. (For reference, the DOD receives ~21%). No wonder this sort of stuff happens. Ugh.


At the peak of the construction phase of the Apollo Program in 1966 NASA's annual budget reached it's highest point at 4.41% of the Federal budget. 

It is currently at aproximately 0.58% of the Federal budget, but that's hard to say for sure because Congress failed to write a Federal budget for the current year.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: dbeechum on June 02, 2011, 08:59:12 PM
I'm originally from the Orlando area, Apopka and what not.

I remember as a kid the incredible pride everyone had when the shuttle rolled out. I remember standing between the wings of my school on the bright blue cold day that we lost Challenger.

Shaking things up in NASA would be good, but I get wary that folks will use it as an opportune moment to pull the whole scaffolding down.

Corporate research is great where it falls in line with a company's profit motive in the short term. (A problem these days in a great many corporate decisions, not just research) It's bad for supporting answering fundamental questions that have no immediately apparent use. For an example of that look at the pharm market where there are a solutions for rare (and not so rare) diseases that won't get funded/brought to market because the yielded profit isn't in line with perceived needs.

Tom's absolutely right about what's happening with science right now in this country. So many of the graduate students in our top flight schools are from out of the country and instead of staying are now returning to their home countries.

I  remember being ragingly angry at the cancellation of the SSC in Texas back in 1993. (Nothing like MIT for fostering science rage amongst young geeks). Yes, it would have cost ~12B, but would have been more powerful and yielded incredible results more than 15 years ahead of the LHC in Switzerland. Oddly, that's one of the few times NASA came out ahead because they kept the funding for the ISS instead.

I takes me science seriously and hate when human issues get in the way.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 02, 2011, 09:27:34 PM
I'm originally from the Orlando area, Apopka and what not.

I remember as a kid the incredible pride everyone had when the shuttle rolled out. I remember standing between the wings of my school on the bright blue cold day that we lost Challenger.

I  remember being ragingly angry at the cancellation of the SSC in Texas back in 1993. (Nothing like MIT for fostering science rage amongst young geeks). Yes, it would have cost ~12B, but would have been more powerful and yielded incredible results more than 15 years ahead of the LHC in Switzerland. Oddly, that's one of the few times NASA came out ahead because they kept the funding for the ISS instead.

I takes me science seriously and hate when human issues get in the way.

I was standing on the shore of the Indian River in Titusville that cold day in January 1986 - 11 miles from pad 39B.  At first I thought the orbiter had detached from the stack and had returned to the SLF. Through the smoke I saw a chase plane land on runway 33 and thought it was the Challenger. One of the lowest days in my life.

I was studying US Government at Valencia Community College in 1993.  I was assigned to watch C-SPAN. I watched live, the vote in Congress that pulled funding for the Super-conducting Super Collider.  Almost in the same breath Congress barely voted to continue funding for the International Space Station.  I remember sitting there stunned - thinking that I must be watching a Saturday Night Live skit, not the US Congress live.  It was surreal how easily members of Congress voted to throw away the billions already invested in the SCC.

Science is absolutely about human issues.  Our planet cannot support the population of humans on it without scientific innovation.

Ellison Onizuka was from Hawaii Island, and an Eagle Scout in our Boy Scout district.  We are very proud of that.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: SpanishCastleAle on June 03, 2011, 12:59:48 PM
Here a 13+ minute tribute video to Endeavour. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DO7ZBp4HXQA)

That water tower you see in some of these pics?  It dumps all over the pad during launch (you'll see it in the video) and is for sound suppression.  The shuttle and cargo can be damaged by reflected sound from the SRBs and the water prevents that.  Much of the 'cloud' around the pad during launch is steam.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 12, 2011, 06:28:54 AM
Here a 13+ minute tribute video to Endeavour. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DO7ZBp4HXQA)

That water tower you see in some of these pics?  It dumps all over the pad during launch (you'll see it in the video) and is for sound suppression.  The shuttle and cargo can be damaged by reflected sound from the SRBs and the water prevents that.  Much of the 'cloud' around the pad during launch is steam.

Wow, I missed the link to the Endeavour tribute on my first read.  Wow!  Excellent!  I like the homage to each of the components of the stack.

What really galls me is that the very symbol of American exceptionalism is being done away with, and not replaced, by those who travel the world apologizing for American exceptionalism, when the world looks to America to be exceptional and lead the way.

Below is a link to one of the best launch videos I have seen.  It is from a hand-held camera on the roof of the VAB.  I really like how the pitch of the shockwaves red-shift as the rockets accelerate downrange.  It takes me back to all of the launches I watched in person.  Being there in person is an overwhelming experience; it makes my laugh and cry at the same time.  Man, would I love ride the stack!

Discovery - STS-131 Launch (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1etSLWk0Ks)
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: tschmidlin on June 12, 2011, 04:48:23 PM
What really galls me is that the very symbol of American exceptionalism is being done away with, and not replaced, by those who travel the world apologizing for American exceptionalism, when the world looks to America to be exceptional and lead the way.
The timeline to retire the shuttle was laid out in 2004.  The blame for a lack of replacement falls on every congress since the first launch for failing to sufficiently fund the research needed to develop a replacement.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: ccarlson on June 13, 2011, 02:50:58 PM

What really galls me is that the very symbol of American exceptionalism is being done away with, and not replaced, by those who travel the world apologizing for American exceptionalism, when the world looks to America to be exceptional and lead the way.



I agree 100%.
Title: Re: NASA Crawler
Post by: punatic on June 14, 2011, 12:04:02 AM
What really galls me is that the very symbol of American exceptionalism is being done away with, and not replaced, by those who travel the world apologizing for American exceptionalism, when the world looks to America to be exceptional and lead the way.
The timeline to retire the shuttle was laid out in 2004.  The blame for a lack of replacement falls on every congress since the first launch for failing to sufficiently fund the research needed to develop a replacement.

NASA Constellation (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/main/)