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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: gymrat on July 20, 2011, 03:17:29 PM

Title: Dry hop question
Post by: gymrat on July 20, 2011, 03:17:29 PM
When I dry hop this time I want to use a hop sack. Is it necessary to sanitize the hop sack? Or will there be enough alcohol in my beer after a week of fermenting to do the sanitizing?
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: denny on July 20, 2011, 03:19:05 PM
You might be able to get away without sanitizing the sack, but why take the chance when it's so easy to do?  I put mine in a small bowl of water and put it in the microwave for 2-3 min.
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: gymrat on July 20, 2011, 03:22:28 PM
Cool. I never thought of that. Thankyou very much for your prompt reply.
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: docmckee on July 25, 2011, 03:48:34 PM
I keep a spray bottle of Star-san around for things like that.  Just grab it up, mist whatever you are working with, and move on.
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: jhwk on July 25, 2011, 08:57:44 PM
I actually have a 5 gallon bucket of starsan for larger items... Like this.

Soak the bag, drain it and fill with hops.

OR, you can dry hop in the fermenter. Wait until activity has slowed down (little airlock activity, or 4 points above expected final gravity). Pour hops directly into fermenter and swirl the carboy/bucket to get everything nice and stirred up.  Repeat the swirling once or twice a day for the next 3 days, then let settle until day 14 of fermentation. rack off and you are done.
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: gymrat on July 26, 2011, 03:03:24 PM
Your idea makes a lot of sense. But I am trying to avoid loose hops in my fermenter. I am tired of clogged up bottling wand.
Title: Re: Dry hop question
Post by: richardt on July 26, 2011, 03:16:41 PM
The less yeast you have in the fermentor, the better. 
Dry hopping is all about getting the hop oils (aroma>flavor). 
If you swirl up the yeast or still have fermentation taking place, you'll find the hop oils adsorbing onto the yeast and the aromas being driven off by CO2 produced during fermentation. The result is that less hop oils make it into your finished beer.
You might want to consider clarifying the beer and transferring the bright beer to a secondary fermentor or keg and dry hopping for 5-7 days with a nylon sack as described above.