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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: kuroshio2 on January 02, 2010, 04:27:36 AM

Title: really stupid question....
Post by: kuroshio2 on January 02, 2010, 04:27:36 AM
a complete home brew virgin, i bought this fermentation bucket as part of a starter kit...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0028LXHNQ/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=471057153&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001PQU73S&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_r=108JGQMV4FG1DC5QXCK0

and these are the instructions... http://www.brew-it-yourself.co.uk/instructions/BrewBuddyStarter.pdf

am i being stupid or is the fact that it completely airtight with no fermentation lock not a problem?

where does the co2 go?

apologies if this is a really basic question, maybe i am missing something!

any advice very welcome...

thx
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: brewmasternpb on January 02, 2010, 05:31:26 AM
That is not a stupid question.  Is there a hole in the lid where you can put an airlock?  That's my only guess.  You should e-mail or call the seller (or manufacturer) and ask them where the airlock fits.  I also think it's a bit off that you don't boil the wort.  I know you don't have to, but there are advantages to boiling it.  You're off to a good start!  Good eye!  Keep it up.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: boulderbrewer on January 02, 2010, 05:36:11 AM
If there is no place to put an airlock, just put the lid on loosely and you should be fine the CO2 will find their way out.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: gail on January 02, 2010, 06:14:45 AM
No stupid questions here; welcome to what will likely be your new obsession, er, hobby!
Looking at the pictures and description, I'm wondering if there is a gasket under the bucket lid.  If not, it's likely not air/co2 tight and will easily dispel the built up pressure.  If there is a gasket, boulderbrewer is right on the money with the advice to just loosely affix the lid.
Good luck and have fun!
Gail
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: beerocd on January 02, 2010, 04:32:45 PM
Just buy a small grommet and an airlock.
Use a drillbit to make your hole, insert grommet into hole, airlock into grommet and you're all set.
(http://www.homebrewit.com/images/5108.jpg)
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: kuroshio2 on January 04, 2010, 10:45:42 AM
thanks for the advice. have decided to go with the manufacturer on this one and invest in a carboy for the next batch...
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: Jeff Renner on January 06, 2010, 12:06:01 AM
invest in a carboy for the next batch...

Be very careful with glass carboys.  Over the years there have been reports of trips to the ER with severed arteries and tendons, and in the newest (I think) Zymurgy, a horror story about a brewer who nearly cut his hand off!  It was actually flipped back on his wrist.  [Shudder]

I've broken a few over the years with nothing lost but beer, but they still scare me.  I have an orange handle on the neck, but never lift by that alone, and keep them in plastic milk crates except when I have to take them out to rinse them after cleaning.

Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: karlh on January 06, 2010, 05:01:54 AM
Jeff's advice on careful handling of glass carboys is a good word of caution.  My horror story only involved a few stitches, around 500 bucks in copays, and a finger thats still a little numb a few years later.  I stopped using glass carboys (she who must be obeyed banned them from the house actually) after my incident, and I haven't missed them much.  I still dream about a 14 gallon conical one day....
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: denny on January 06, 2010, 04:30:42 PM
Although I didn't have as bad a carboy experience as Karl, I did break 3 of them and lost gallons of double decocted pils.  That was the last time I used a carboy...it's either buckets or cornies for fermentation now.  After using buckets for several years and maybe 100+ batches, I've found absolutely no downsides to them.  In fact, I fInd them easier to clean and store than carboys.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: Kaiser on January 06, 2010, 04:36:37 PM
...That was the last time I used a carboy...

And decocted a beer ;)

I have started switching to buckets as well. I just want to see if it makes my process easier or more enjoyable. I even cut a large hole into the lid onto which I place a sanitized glass pot lid. That allows me to see the Kraeusen since I do still like to see the beer fermenting.

Kai
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: bluesman on January 06, 2010, 04:38:14 PM
I broke my first carboy last year. Fortunately it happened while I was cleaning it and there were no injuries. They really have a great potential for disaster. I am extremely careful and cautious when handling them. Even with the orange handles and a harness, I am still leary about moving them. One should excercise precautions like long leather gloves, long pants, safety glasses and a Carhartt type jacket would suffice. This may sound like alot, but please heed to the warnings while using glass carboys.

Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: denny on January 06, 2010, 04:43:27 PM
...That was the last time I used a carboy...

And decocted a beer ;)

You devil!!   ;D

Actually, I do maybe one decoction a year still, just to see if it will change my opinion.  So far, it hasn't.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: roffenburger on January 06, 2010, 05:00:13 PM
When I started brewing I was under the impression that glass was far superior than plastic. I have found though, that buckets are way easier to use-cleaning, storing, handling. Glass can weaken over time, and get bruised if bumped creating a weak spot. You should either use glass or better bottles if you are doing a secondary fermentation.

I really wish I had just a little bit bigger pot so I could do 8.5 gallon batches and ferment in 2 cornies!
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: dean on January 06, 2010, 05:29:15 PM
I have a hard time justifying the use of a cornie for fermenting, how much finished beer do you end up with when fermenting in a 5 gallon cornie?   :-\
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: denny on January 06, 2010, 06:13:30 PM
I have a hard time justifying the use of a cornie for fermenting, how much finished beer do you end up with when fermenting in a 5 gallon cornie?   :-\

Maybe 4 gal.  But I use 10 gal. cornies.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: roffenburger on January 06, 2010, 06:34:52 PM
I have a hard time justifying the use of a cornie for fermenting, how much finished beer do you end up with when fermenting in a 5 gallon cornie?   :-\

See...that's the thing...
I would rather spend 5 hours brewing and getting 5 gallons finished product than the same amount of time for 4 gallons. If I had just a little bit bigger pot, I could justify fermenting 4.25 gallons each in 2 cornies~8 gallons finished product for 5 hours work. Then maybe bottle three gallons (since I like to give beer away) and have 5 gallons kegged. I don't think I am interested in spending the same amount of time for a gallon less- I agree with you on that... 8)
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: brewmasternpb on January 07, 2010, 06:57:44 AM
Wow!  Thanks everyone for scaring the holy Jesus out of me!  I've been using glass carboys for 7 years, and was still under the impression that they are the better option.  I brew in an upstairs carpeted room.  I guess the good side is, carpet doesn't hurt glass like other surfaces... but do I really want 5 gallons of wort draining into the second floor of my house??  Should I panic and switch to buckets immediately?
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: roffenburger on January 07, 2010, 02:25:00 PM
Don't be scared of glass carboy, just be aware that accidents happen. Some people use milk crates to carry their glass carboys around when full. Just be careful with them. I still use mine, but recently have been using plastic for ease of use.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: brewmasternpb on January 07, 2010, 03:55:25 PM
OK.  I might try to do my primary in plastic, just to see how it goes.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: brewmasternpb on January 08, 2010, 04:54:55 AM
So, I read that article in Zymurgy about the guy slashing his wrist open.  I have these thoughts:
1) It was second "hand" (no pun intended) information, so it could possibly be fabricated or exaggerated.  I do see, however, how it could be possible.
2) Why was he carrying it by the neck?  I carry mine with two hands on the bottom.  Again though, I could be in danger if it cracked.
3) How hard did he "bump" it?  And what did he bump it on?
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: karlh on January 08, 2010, 01:24:59 PM
So, I read that article in Zymurgy about the guy slashing his wrist open.  I have these thoughts:
1) It was second "hand" (no pun intended) information, so it could possibly be fabricated or exaggerated.  I do see, however, how it could be possible.
2) Why was he carrying it by the neck?  I carry mine with two hands on the bottom.  Again though, I could be in danger if it cracked.
3) How hard did he "bump" it?  And what did he bump it on?
When my (last) carboy broke in my hands it was empty, I had just cleaned it and was taking it out of the sink.  It barely tapped the edge of the laundry sink.  Place index finger behnind thumb and "snap" kind of force... about that much of a bump.  Glass has imperfections, and little bumps can make us learn about them in the worst possible way. 
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: denny on January 08, 2010, 04:31:21 PM
So, I read that article in Zymurgy about the guy slashing his wrist open.  I have these thoughts:
1) It was second "hand" (no pun intended) information, so it could possibly be fabricated or exaggerated.  I do see, however, how it could be possible.

It's also possible, maybe likely, that it's completely true and accurate

2) Why was he carrying it by the neck?  I carry mine with two hands on the bottom.  Again though, I could be in danger if it cracked.

Based on my experience, the way you hold it makes no difference.  A slight bump is all it takes.

3) How hard did he "bump" it?  And what did he bump it on?

Like I said, it doesn't take much.  One of mine broke with a slight bump against a plastic sink.  Another one broke when it slipped out of my hands, fell 2 ", and landed flat on its bottom on a carpeted surface.
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: BrewArk on January 08, 2010, 04:40:33 PM
The only one I ever broke was on it's side on a shelf and rolled into another one.  I was kinda afraid to use the survivor the first time after that. :(
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: brewmasternpb on January 10, 2010, 12:50:49 AM
Thanks for your feedback guys.  It is good to know the dangers.  It's not that I'm not taking the threat seriously, I just question what I read  ::)
Title: Re: really stupid question....
Post by: hamiltont on January 10, 2010, 01:27:02 AM
Moving carboys is dangerous & I'm getting too old to do it the old fashion way so I bought a small furniture cart to move them around.  I'm fortunate that everything for the brewery is on one level so stairs are not necessary. Here's a link to a couple pics of the cart and cart with a carboy. http://www.flickr.com/photos/46231362@N06/sets/72157623176732186/ (http://www.flickr.com/photos/46231362@N06/sets/72157623176732186/)