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Other than Brewing => The Pub => Topic started by: phillamb168 on August 14, 2011, 05:39:15 PM

Title: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 14, 2011, 05:39:15 PM
Times are tough, but sometimes you gotta sit back and think about how great a day can be. So that's what this thread should be about, perfect days. Today, for example, I got to:

1. sleep in (I usually wake up at 4am for an Australian client and don't go to bed until 10 or 11)
2. go for a drive with my wife and talk about random stuff (I love that)
3. play with my son in the yard for more than an hour. He just started walking and I was lucky enough to see him take his very first steps yesterday (steps plural, he's been doing a one-step drop for a while)
4. coming up to the deck to clean it from all the hazlenuts that have fallen, and finding that my cascade and EKG hops are going -gangbusters-. Gonna be a good fall.
5. bbq while watching a bears preseason game, drinking my pliny clone
6. just about to open a Cuvee van de keizer 2010 from Carolus
7. just about to eat MORE wings and kebab.
8. etc etc...

Have you had a good day recently?
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 14, 2011, 05:57:24 PM
Good on ya, Phil!  My day won't be as relaxing and satisfying as yours was, but any day above ground is a good day!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 14, 2011, 06:39:51 PM
Ah and something else, punatic will appreciate this as a fellow BSA supporter: There's a BSA troop for Paris! There are local scouting outfits but nothing matches the BSA, ever. So knowing my boy can do BSA makes me a very happy camper. As long as his experience of scout camp was better than mine in central Florida... eep.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 14, 2011, 07:04:31 PM
Being a scout was one of the best things I've ever done.  I still draw on the things I learned there.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 14, 2011, 07:55:09 PM
Every morning when my feet hit the floor I thank God for another day of life in Hawaii.  It is not an accident that I am living here.  I worked hard for a long time to make it happened.  I am living the life I want, in my favorite place in the world.

This afternoon my family and I will be attending the first Troop 65 leaders meeting of the new Scouting year.  Our Scouting year follows the school year.  We will be planning our activities for the upcoming year.

The meeting is at Queen Liliuokalani Park on the Hilo bayfront.  A beautiful place overlooking the bay - across the bay is the town of Hilo, with Mauna Kea rising up behind.  The meeting is potluck and everyone brings something to share and something to grill.  The kids fish and swim while the adult leaders and senior Scouts work out the schedule of activities for the coming year.  These people have become my ohana.  I cannot tell you how lucky I am that I have them in my life.

I'm happy to read that there are Scouts in Paris Phil!  If you check the bios of the astronauts, great leaders, and other successful men, you will find that many are Eagle Scouts (once an Eagle, always an Eagle).  Scouting is an excellent organization.  The best part is, as a Scout leader, I get to be in the Scouts all over again, and help my son and other boys grow up to be good men. 
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: 1vertical on August 14, 2011, 10:13:52 PM
A great day for me would be having phil send me a black perigord truffel
that he dug up from around the base of his hazelnut tree....!!!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tygo on August 15, 2011, 12:09:30 AM
Scouting is an excellent organization.  The best part is, as a Scout leader, I get to be in the Scouts all over again, and help my son and other boys grow up to be good men. 

I hope that when the time comes my sons show some interest in scouting.  I was involved from the time I was 6 until I was about 19. 
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bluesman on August 15, 2011, 01:22:10 AM
I'm greatful to join this community of folks that gather together for the benefit of this fascinating fermented beverage we all call beer. Cheers to beer!  :)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 02:55:48 AM
Scouting is an excellent organization.  The best part is, as a Scout leader, I get to be in the Scouts all over again, and help my son and other boys grow up to be good men. 

I hope that when the time comes my sons show some interest in scouting.  I was involved from the time I was 6 until I was about 19. 

It's up to you to make the commitment to get them involved, and be involved yourself.  Chances are they will have great times, and you will have more fun than they do.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 04:09:59 AM
Re: scouting, my son is interested but I won't let him join.  If they ever decide to let everyone participate, we'll happily join.

We had a great weekend though - we went to a nearby farm that has a park including a roller coaster, ferris wheel, a bunch of other rides, a petting zoo, pony rides . . . they didn't want to leave.  Nice dinner (grilled salmon and farm-fresh veggies), then camping on the backyard.  Today we went to a brew day at a friends' house, we haven't seen them in a couple of years.  Good times. 8)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 04:31:55 AM
Re: scouting, my son is interested but I won't let him join.  If they ever decide to let everyone participate, we'll happily join.

Check out your local Cub Scout Packs.  I'm betting that you'll find one, or more  that let everyone except child molesters participate.

We exclude no one from Pack, Troop, Crew 65.  Religion, ethnicity, political leanings, gender and gender preferences are non-issues.  It's all about teaching our children the skills they need to be successful in life.

Venturers are for boys and girls.  Our Venturing Crew has more girls than boys (about 60/40).  Family members are welcome to (and do) participate in all of our activities.  We couldn't do what we do without them.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 05:02:30 AM
Re: scouting, my son is interested but I won't let him join.  If they ever decide to let everyone participate, we'll happily join.

Check out your local Cub Scout Packs.  I'm betting that you'll find one that lets everyone except child molesters participate.
I'm sure you're right, this is a very liberal area in that way and they would almost certainly let anyone join.  The problem is that, unless they are running a rogue organization and have rewritten some things, it violates the membership policy, Scout Oath, and Law.  Until I can figure out how to violate them without violating them, we're at an impasse. :)  Meaning, you can't be trustworthy if you are lying when you take the oath.  We teach our kids that lying is wrong, so I can hardly encourage or condone lying in the oath.

My only hope is that they will get some new leadership and eliminate policies that expressly forbid my family's participation.  I respect their right to run things the way they see fit, I just think it's a shame that they feel the need to exclude people.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: euge on August 15, 2011, 05:29:46 AM
Is it a religious thing? It never occurred to me that the scouts would exclude on that basis... :-\ Damn shame.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 06:04:04 AM
The BSA encourages Scouts to explore their parents religious beliefs, whatever those beliefs may be. We encourage parents and their children to have that dialogue, so that there is continuity from parent to child.  We feel that this is important, no matter what the parents' beliefs are.  Talk to your child.  Give them the foundation for your religious or non-religious beliefs in your own words.  Too many children are sent out into the world with no guidance from the people they look to the most for guidance, their parents.

Religion is not the main focus of Scouting by far.  Scouting endorses no religion over another.  Scouting's policy is that it is important that children are guided in their religious beliefs by their parents.

There has been a lot of erroneous information put out about Boy Scouts.  Don't let other people tell you what to think about the Scouts.  Go to the original sources, find out for yourself, and then decide.

We've gone way off of the OP.  Lo siento mucho.  Scouting brings me small joys, and large. 

It is noteworthy that so many successful members of our society were Scouts.

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: dbeechum on August 15, 2011, 07:06:10 AM
I don't know if it makes anyone feel better about scouting or not, but I got kicked out for decking the son of my troop leader. I think its fair to say I had anger issues at that age. (Of course, it is sad that as a flag waving atheist]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boy_Scouts_of_America_membership_controversies#Position_on_atheists_and_agnostics]atheist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boy_Scouts_of_America_membership_controversies#Position_on_atheists_and_agnostics), I'd be barred today)

On the small joys angle -

Getting to brew beer with friends visiting and sharing a pizza and some homemade beer.
Realizing that I have a bottle of Fantome Magic Ghost waiting for me
Getting that nice quiet moment to read and have a cup of coffee.
Being woke up in the morning by a goofy dog who's decided she'd like some love now.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 07:16:53 AM
Go to original sources.  "In their own words." 

Not someone else (Wikipedia) telling you what to think.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: dbeechum on August 15, 2011, 07:27:17 AM
The fight over both Welsh v. BSA and Randall v. OC Council would seem to be pretty clear. Add the fact that the BSA expelled the Randall's once the CA Supreme Court lifted the injunction despite the boys achieving Eagle during the intervening period and it seems pretty clear what the position of the BSA governing bodies is on non-theists.

Scouting does have a lot to offer, which is why it's disappointing, but meh.. straying again.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 07:48:32 AM
I agree, this is way off the OP, sorry.  We can start a new thread to discuss it if you think we should.

Scouting endorses no religion over another.
This is my understanding, except that while scouting doesn't endorse one religion over another, you need to have some religion.  "Not religious" is not an option.

Aside from the cases Drew mentioned, it is hard to misinterpret.

A - One requirement to join scouting is to "Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or Promise, Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code."

B - The oath includes "To do my duty to God"

C - The scout law includes "A Scout is . . . reverent."

D - The scouts explain reverent as "A Scout is reverent, he is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties and respects the convictions of others in matters of custom and religion."

Based on that, I don't see any room for the non-religious.  You can't do your duty to or be reverent toward something you don't believe in.

If this is not the right original source you're referring to let me know
http://www.scouting.org/
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 15, 2011, 08:05:52 AM
Don't go getting my thread locked! I started this because there were too many threads getting hijacked and starting arguments. There's enough of that in the regular world these days.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 08:23:35 AM
Don't go getting my thread locked! I started this because there were too many threads getting hijacked and starting arguments. There's enough of that in the regular world these days.
Sorry Phil, I figure this is a fine discussion since we are discussing scouting and not any taboo subjects.  But yes, we veered way off topic, but the whole BSA thing has bugged me since my kids came home all excited from kindergarten after a recruitment meeting a few months back.  Oops, there I go again.  :)

Anyway, small joys:
Teaching my kids how to harvest garlic today.
Reading a book for pleasure now that I have a bit more time.
Playing monkey in the middle. :)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 09:10:06 AM
Don't go getting my thread locked! I started this because there were too many threads getting hijacked and starting arguments. There's enough of that in the regular world these days.

You've created a great thread Phil.  There is much to be shared in here that we can all enjoy and agree on.

 Drew, Tom & I have taken the Scouting discussion to another place.  In spite of our differeces the discussion remains respectful and civil.  After all, we are friends.  (Even if they are doo doo heads for disagreeing with me.   ;D  )

As I write this my best friend, a six-month-old black cat named Hebert, is curled up on my lap sleeping.  He often does this while I work at my computer.  Six months ago he was just a baby bump.  Now he is my best friend.  Who knew?  How cool is that?  And, I bet you know how to pronounce his name correctly Phil.  
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 09:16:27 AM
And, I bet you know how to pronounce his name correctly Phil. 
Come on Carl, what self-respecting hockey fan doesn't know how to pronouce Hebert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Hebert)? ;D
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 09:21:33 AM
And, I bet you know how to pronounce his name correctly Phil.  
Come on Carl, what self-respecting hockey fan doesn't know how to pronouce Hebert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Hebert)? ;D

Hockey...?  
Isn't that what you do to get rid of phlegm?    :D

And your link only shows how to pronounce Guy.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: euge on August 15, 2011, 09:36:04 AM
I was truly curious- being ignorant of the scouts for the most part. Sorry to drag it off the path.

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 15, 2011, 09:47:28 AM
Hockey...?  
Isn't that what you do to get rid of phlegm?    :D

And your link only shows how to pronounce Guy.
I don't need the link to know how to pronounce Guy Hebert. ;)

<edit>It's got the pronunciation for Hebert right after the "gi", although I was always terrible at reading those pronunciation guides.  They are completely non-helpful to me.  "gi" makes sense - "eˈbɛʁ" would be nonsensical if I didn't already know how to say it.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: akr71 on August 15, 2011, 12:22:15 PM
We've have a rather wet summer here, but this weekend was sunny & dry, so we tried to make the most of it as a family.

Friday - picked my daughter up from the final day of Outdoor Survival Camp (where it rained most of the week).  It was my wife's birthday, so I made Beef Wellington at her request (& it turned out awesome).

Satruday - took the family to the Dieppe International Kite Festival (that's Dieppe New Brunswick).  Saw some cool kites, but spent most of our time on the midway.  Took my son on the superslide and my daughter on the ferris wheel (finally, there is someone in this family who's not afraid of heights and will do stuff with Dad!  My son is not yet 3, so I'll give him a pass for now).  Spent the evening with friends we haven't seen in months.

Sunday - took the wife and kids to spend the afternoon with their grandmother/great grandmother for National Acadian Day (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Acadian_Day) Edit: just checked that link - modern celebrations are more like this (http://timestranscript.canadaeast.com/news/article/1431730).

PS - Guides & Scouts in Canada have reworked their pledges & mottos to remove the religious references.  Tom, you might be able to find a troup that does the same.  I won't be surprised if my duaghter wants to jump over to Scouts from Guides as they seem to do more hands-on outdoor stuff.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: gordonstrong on August 15, 2011, 12:31:20 PM
I look back at Scouting fondly.  Very positive life skills I'm sure I'm still using today.  I know I saved at least 3 lives with skills I learned in scouting.  As Bill Murray said, so I've got that going for me.

Eagle Scout, 1976.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 15, 2011, 01:29:34 PM
Is there a brewing merit badge? FWIW while I definitely want my kids in scouting, I personally had a great time up until my first scout (as opposed to cub/webelos) state jamboree, where a fellow scout threatened to stab me. I got out pretty quick after that. Apparently, in Florida (or so my dad told me) judges offer juvenile offenders a choice between juvie and scout camp. I am absolutely certain that scouting here (and everywhere else, really) will not be like what my experience was.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: weithman5 on August 15, 2011, 02:17:05 PM
love the boy scouts.  father of two eagle scouts.  last time i was at philmont (been several times) one of the boys i had in the troop was from japan and had moved to illinois.  he was sitting next to a kid from baltimore.  they recognized each other from japan. go figure. great organization. 

Gordon.  being from ohio i assume you got to spend some time at camp avery hand? right down the street from my mother's farm. it has been sold off mostly now.  very sad
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: richardt on August 15, 2011, 03:10:11 PM
Can the adult scouts get a brewing merit badge?
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: gordonstrong on August 15, 2011, 03:19:06 PM
I grew up in upstate NY.  Went to Beech Mountain scout camp in the Catskills.  Also likely closed now, sadly.

A brewing merit badge sounds like fun.  What would the requirements be?  The design could be a mash paddle logo or something.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 15, 2011, 04:01:56 PM
Eagle Scout, 1976.

Beat ya by 10 years!  Order of the Arrow, too.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 04:47:13 PM
Eagle Scout, 1976.

Beat ya by 10 years!  Order of the Arrow, too.

Wow guys...  right on!

I really wanted to go to Philmont when I was a Scout.  It didnt happen because I moved around so much growing up.  Ten of our senior Scouts went to Philmont two summers ago.  The change in their maturity levels and self confidence when they returned was marked.  All ten have become Eagle Scouts or are working on their eagle projects now.  The ten have a close friendship that only comes from a shared experience like Philmont.  My son is almost 12.  It is our goal to go to Philmont in 3 or 4 summers from now.  I can hardly wait!  Being a Scout leader is turning out to be more fun than beiing a Scout was.

Phil, that really sucks, what happened to you.  There is ZERO tolerance for that type of behavior in the Scouts that I am involed with.  I am from Florida.  I have never heard of the policy you describe.  It doesn't sound like a good one for the example you gave.  I hope that won't keep you from getting you and your family involved in Scouting there in France.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: dbeechum on August 15, 2011, 04:50:36 PM
Beat ya by 10 years!  Order of the Arrow, too.

Ladies and gentlepersons,

Proof that via homebrew even a nonagenarian like Denny can be as spry as a septuagenarian! :)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: weithman5 on August 15, 2011, 05:12:52 PM


I really wanted to go to Philmont when I was a Scout.

Philmont was pretty cool, i was scout master for that twice, boundary waters twice and seabase once.  i think the best trip is the boundary waters. just absolute peace and quiet. If you didn't make it as a scout, maybe as a scout leader.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 15, 2011, 05:22:51 PM
Beat ya by 10 years!  Order of the Arrow, too.

Ladies and gentlepersons,

Proof that via homebrew even a nonagenarian like Denny can be as spry as a septuagenarian! :)

Just you wait til YOU grow up!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on August 15, 2011, 06:16:11 PM
A bit of a shame,
the Sharing small joys thread turning into the Boy Scout thread. :-\

Rejoicing in small joys is worthy.

I just spend a glorious week in the alpine wilderness,
away from electricity, people, and the persistent hum of engines.

On the way home, all burnt and leg weary,
we dropped off this hill
passed a fat bear munching in an avalanche chute,
and within 6 minutes were in town at the brewery enjoying a soured Berliner Weisse.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/StoneyPass.jpg)

After only water for 5 days, that was a real treat. 
And to have a beer like that in such a remote location...even better.

Cheers to the proliferation of craft brewing.

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 15, 2011, 06:25:45 PM
I just walked up to the front of our property to open the front gate for my wife to leave for work.  There have been wild pigs roaming da hood lately so we keep our fences secure and gates closed. On my way back to the house I discovered that my cacao trees are blooming!  Gorgeous flowers they are! 

Then I stopped at my pineapple patch and picked a white pineapple (Kona sugarloaf variety).  It's white pineapple season!  This baby is going to taste sooooo good when I get done with my daily bike ride.

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: dbeechum on August 15, 2011, 06:36:57 PM
Nah, you know.. Scouts are a small joy for many. Some of us (like the angry kid version of me) had less than positive experiences with it.

It really does seem like the secret to the universe is letting go of your anger, letting go of the personal notion of being hurt and finding the joy / beauty in everything.

These days I kinda shake my head at the amount of anger I had back then. It really amazes me. And truthfully, the reason I got into a fight with that kid had nothing to do with Scouts and everything to do with him acting like a pretentious privileged git because of his dad's position.  It would still make me mad today, but instead I try and focus myself on that little secret and the knowledge that he had his own issues.

One of these nights, I'll finally acheive the perfect balance of what my partner refers to as my being "an atheist with Buddhist tendencies" :)

In the meanwhile, I'll focus on the gurgling fountain one room over, the breeze of the ceiling fan, the look of absolute devotion from my baby girl Chorgi and the notion that a little later today, I'll pour myself a glass of IPA. (But no white pineapple for me, sadness)

Now if only I could do something about the damnably pathetically cute Chi who's barking his fool head off at the gardeners two doors down.

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 15, 2011, 06:45:52 PM
It really does seem like the secret to the universe is letting go of your anger, letting go of the personal notion of being hurt and finding the joy / beauty in everything.

THIS^^^^^
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: theDarkSide on August 15, 2011, 06:55:28 PM
It really does seem like the secret to the universe is letting go of your anger, 

It's statements like this that really piss me off  >:(   ;)

I would have made a terrible Jedi ( but one hell of a sith )

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: corkybstewart on August 15, 2011, 07:49:49 PM
I've got a great wife, been married 30 years now, 2 kids who turned out good enough as adults to go to work with me, I've got a good job and for the first time in 18 years we have great neighbors.  They both homebrew now, and George has covered his gas grill and now barbecues properly-on charcoal.
I'd say life is pretty good, and will only get better when my wife finishes her d**n master's degree in December.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 15, 2011, 08:09:20 PM
A bit of a shame,
the Sharing small joys thread turning into the Boy Scout thread. :-\

Rejoicing in small joys is worthy.

I just spend a glorious week in the alpine wilderness,
away from electricity, people, and the persistent hum of engines.

On the way home, all burnt and leg weary,
we dropped off this hill
passed a fat bear munching in an avalanche chute,
and within 6 minutes were in town at the brewery enjoying a soured Berliner Weisse.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/StoneyPass.jpg)

After only water for 5 days, that was a real treat. 
And to have a beer like that in such a remote location...even better.

Cheers to the proliferation of craft brewing.



 :o

Thanks for sharing. That sounds like an absolutely amazing vacation.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: Slowbrew on August 15, 2011, 10:49:41 PM
I'm just happy that the call this afternoon from my wife, a fender bender my 16 year old daughter was involved in, was to let me know everything was okay and the man she backed into just wanted to talk about how to deal with the minor damage.  All 3 of my daughters were unhurt  and the gentleman driving the other car was understanding ,so no police, no insurance and no screwing up of my brand new driver's record.  It was a blessing and I am blessed.

My son totaled a car in January.  Icy streets, 8 inches of snow, no control, 15 MPH in a 25 and the officer threw the book at him.  Simply for the crime of being 16 years old +1 day.  In Iowa you have no rights as a 16 year old driver and he is suffering the consequences of bad roads and a (sorry) prick for a cop.  His sister backed into a man driving his son's car.  The son, 31 now, got completely screwed over by an adult for the same type of situation when he was 17.  Mad is a good driver and bumped the right guy.  I thank God for little favors.

Sunsets are great, but meeting people who understand kids are kids and sh@# happens is so much better at this point in my life.  Had her license for 3 weeks and ran into a situation you can't prepare for, the worst thing is the person who caused it probably doesn't even know it happened.

I used to think Iowan's knew how to drive.  Now I know it depends on where you were raised.  In Des Moines, wear a helmet and mount a camera on your dash, you'll be glad you did.

Paul

*** Edited to fix my usual missed word and modifiers.  ***
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: maxieboy on August 16, 2011, 12:35:02 AM
New gig. Outdoors everyday, fresh air, strenuous activity, wildlife spotted daily, and bird songs to behold at breaks and lunch. Beer at the end of the day taking on another dimension...
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: Hokerer on August 16, 2011, 01:42:57 AM
Eagle Scout, 1976.

Beat ya by 10 years!  Order of the Arrow, too.

Ha, Denny's old.  1975 for me
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 16, 2011, 02:31:39 AM
I got my Mile Swim patch at Camp Goshen, VA in the summer of 1968.  That was a great camp!

"Ross is Boss!"
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: majorvices on August 16, 2011, 05:27:18 PM
I just picked a garden tomato that was still warm from the sun, sliced it thick and added fresh ground salt and pepper, fried up 3 pieces of bacon and grabbed some crisp romaine lettuce and piled them all lovingly on mayo'ed bread and I was very close to touching nirvana. :)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: Bret on August 16, 2011, 05:37:39 PM
+1 Major.  Been eating these all month.  One of the true joys of summer!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: euge on August 16, 2011, 06:03:34 PM
Nothing like a good BLT. And I commend you for not putting miracle-whip on the sandwich. ;)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 16, 2011, 06:16:38 PM
And I commend you for not putting miracle-whip on the sandwich. ;)
This is like commending someone for not taking a dump in the bidet. ;D

Although I find mayo to be equally gross. :-\
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: Bret on August 16, 2011, 06:28:32 PM
And I commend you for not putting miracle-whip on the sandwich. ;)
This is like commending someone for not taking a dump in the bidet. ;D

Although I find mayo to be equally gross. :-\
Tom what do you put on a BLT then? Mustard?
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: nicneufeld on August 16, 2011, 06:31:43 PM
And I commend you for not putting miracle-whip on the sandwich. ;)
This is like commending someone for not taking a dump in the bidet. ;D

Although I find mayo to be equally gross. :-\

+1.  I've never been accused of being particularly picky, and there are few things I don't eat, but mayo and any of the quasi-mayos of the world are one of the few things I utterly detest.  Which is strange because its not particularly strong tasting, like say, Thai fish sauce.  Although that's another thing I like to go easy on too!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: weithman5 on August 16, 2011, 06:43:28 PM
without mayo (best foods west/hellman's east of the river) it is not a sandwich. now really get her going with a little of tom's horseradish blended in to that mayo and that goes great on a roast beef sandwich.  i have been craving a BLT on toast for two weeks now.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: majorvices on August 16, 2011, 06:55:38 PM
I can't see how you could eat and enjoy a BLT without mayo .... unless you're some kind of wacko.  ;)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 16, 2011, 07:44:00 PM
Re: miracle whip, THIS: http://theoatmeal.com/blog/miracle_whip
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on August 16, 2011, 07:53:30 PM
I just picked a garden tomato that was still warm from the sun, sliced it thick and added fresh ground salt and pepper, fried up 3 pieces of bacon and grabbed some crisp romaine lettuce and piled them all lovingly on mayo'ed bread and I was very close to touching nirvana. :)

Dang mang.  Just having bacon on hand sounds divine.

What kind of bread you got there.  You don't seem like the Wonder type?  Something with some nuts perhaps?
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: majorvices on August 16, 2011, 08:14:31 PM
I haven't eaten plain white, sliced bread in probably 30 years. That said, it was just sliced "Nature's Own" Honey Wheat. Have to admit though, it was perfect!

Speaking of bread, I have found that a good sour dough is THE BREAD to eat with pulled pork sandwich. It's awesome!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: weithman5 on August 16, 2011, 08:27:05 PM
Re: miracle whip, THIS: http://theoatmeal.com/blog/miracle_whip

that's some funny s***, i mean miracle whip
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 16, 2011, 08:47:18 PM
Are you S*#*#**g me?!  You guys actually ingest store-bought mayonaise? 
Whoa...  food poisoning looking for a place to happen.

Is this not a DIY forum? 
Three words: make to order
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: majorvices on August 16, 2011, 08:59:28 PM
The only way to get food poisoning from mayo is if you add it to chicken to make chicken salad. believe it or not Mayo is very stable. You don't even need to refrigerate it (though it retains its flavor better if you do).
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 17, 2011, 05:58:51 AM
Store-bought mayo is presumably loaded with all sorts of crazy preservatives and whatnot, so I'm guessing you don't have to worry about salmonella. I would think that's a bigger risk with home-made mayo, actually, given that it uses raw egg. Of course, if you have chickens, you have pretty much nothing to worry about. Homemade mayo is indeed ridiculously easy to make. egg yolk, drizzle a tiny stream of oil while whisking. Voila.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: tschmidlin on August 17, 2011, 06:36:03 AM
And I commend you for not putting miracle-whip on the sandwich. ;)
This is like commending someone for not taking a dump in the bidet. ;D

Although I find mayo to be equally gross. :-\
Tom what do you put on a BLT then? Mustard?
If available, I'll have avocado.  If it's not available, dry is fine with me. ;)


I can't see how you could eat and enjoy a BLT without mayo .... unless you're some kind of wacko.  ;)
Yes, and? ;D
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 17, 2011, 07:40:25 AM
Store-bought mayo is presumably loaded with all sorts of crazy preservatives and whatnot, so I'm guessing you don't have to worry about salmonella. I would think that's a bigger risk with home-made mayo, actually, given that it uses raw egg. Of course, if you have chickens, you have pretty much nothing to worry about. Homemade mayo is indeed ridiculously easy to make. egg yolk, drizzle a tiny stream of oil while whisking. Voila.

And you claim to live in France?    ???

What you describe is the Miller Lite of mayonaise   ::)

I make my BLT's with wasabi aioli.  Yeah Baby!  Manly mayo for manly men!
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 17, 2011, 09:03:43 AM
Store-bought mayo is presumably loaded with all sorts of crazy preservatives and whatnot, so I'm guessing you don't have to worry about salmonella. I would think that's a bigger risk with home-made mayo, actually, given that it uses raw egg. Of course, if you have chickens, you have pretty much nothing to worry about. Homemade mayo is indeed ridiculously easy to make. egg yolk, drizzle a tiny stream of oil while whisking. Voila.

And you claim to live in France?    ???

What you describe is the Miller Lite of mayonaise   ::)

I make my BLT's with wasabi aioli.  Yeah Baby!  Manly mayo for manly men!

Easy Trigger - If we're getting semantic, aioli is only ever mayo + garlic. Start adding stuff and it becomes flavored mayo.

Relevant post because correcting punatic on cooking techniques is a small joy.   ;D

Edit: my father-in-law makes the egg + oil recipe all the time, unless guests are coming over, in which case he adds in tarragon and chives and lemon juice. In France, the BLTs are so amazing, masking the flavors with overly poofy mayo only lessons the supreme quality of the other ingredients. The bread is baked by a 100-year-old artisan baker whose only oven is a wood-fired model from gallic times, using flour grown in fields where wrens and magpies soar over the heads of frolicking wild boar. The lettuce comes from a monastery, grown by monks who must adhere to strict AOC lettuce guidelines. The tomatoes are hand-delivered from the wicker pannier of a rickety peugeot bicycle ridden by a young man in a flat cap. So of course, the mayo contains only egg and oil, and perhaps some salt. Anything else would be doing a gross injustice to nos compatriotes.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: majorvices on August 17, 2011, 10:17:30 AM
I make my BLT's with wasabi aioli.  Yeah Baby!  Manly mayo for manly men!

To each his own, but sometimes the simple original is the best. A BLT is comfort food through and through. Doesn't need dressed up with anything. In my humble opinion, that is.

That said, I can appreciate the simple joy of homemade mayo - only some of us don't have the time to bask in 80 degree breezy sunshine and drink coconut milk all day and sit around making homemade mayo whenever the hell we want to.  ;)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: jeffy on August 17, 2011, 10:18:01 AM
Store-bought mayo is presumably loaded with all sorts of crazy preservatives and whatnot, so I'm guessing you don't have to worry about salmonella. I would think that's a bigger risk with home-made mayo, actually, given that it uses raw egg. Of course, if you have chickens, you have pretty much nothing to worry about. Homemade mayo is indeed ridiculously easy to make. egg yolk, drizzle a tiny stream of oil while whisking. Voila.

And you claim to live in France?    ???

What you describe is the Miller Lite of mayonaise   ::)

I make my BLT's with wasabi aioli.  Yeah Baby!  Manly mayo for manly men!

Easy Trigger - If we're getting semantic, aioli is only ever mayo + garlic. Start adding stuff and it becomes flavored mayo.

Relevant post because correcting punatic on cooking techniques is a small joy.   ;D

Edit: my father-in-law makes the egg + oil recipe all the time, unless guests are coming over, in which case he adds in tarragon and chives and lemon juice. In France, the BLTs are so amazing, masking the flavors with overly poofy mayo only lessons the supreme quality of the other ingredients. The bread is baked by a 100-year-old artisan baker whose only oven is a wood-fired model from gallic times, using flour grown in fields where wrens and magpies soar over the heads of frolicking wild boar. The lettuce comes from a monastery, grown by monks who must adhere to strict AOC lettuce guidelines. The tomatoes are hand-delivered from the wicker pannier of a rickety peugeot bicycle ridden by a young man in a flat cap. So of course, the mayo contains only egg and oil, and perhaps some salt. Anything else would be doing a gross injustice to nos compatriotes.
Wow!  You should be writing menus for expensive restaurants.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 17, 2011, 11:21:21 AM
Store-bought mayo is presumably loaded with all sorts of crazy preservatives and whatnot, so I'm guessing you don't have to worry about salmonella. I would think that's a bigger risk with home-made mayo, actually, given that it uses raw egg. Of course, if you have chickens, you have pretty much nothing to worry about. Homemade mayo is indeed ridiculously easy to make. egg yolk, drizzle a tiny stream of oil while whisking. Voila.

And you claim to live in France?    ???

What you describe is the Miller Lite of mayonaise   ::)

I make my BLT's with wasabi aioli.  Yeah Baby!  Manly mayo for manly men!

Easy Trigger - If we're getting semantic, aioli is only ever mayo + garlic. Start adding stuff and it becomes flavored mayo.

Relevant post because correcting punatic on cooking techniques is a small joy.   ;D

Edit: my father-in-law makes the egg + oil recipe all the time, unless guests are coming over, in which case he adds in tarragon and chives and lemon juice. In France, the BLTs are so amazing, masking the flavors with overly poofy mayo only lessons the supreme quality of the other ingredients. The bread is baked by a 100-year-old artisan baker whose only oven is a wood-fired model from gallic times, using flour grown in fields where wrens and magpies soar over the heads of frolicking wild boar. The lettuce comes from a monastery, grown by monks who must adhere to strict AOC lettuce guidelines. The tomatoes are hand-delivered from the wicker pannier of a rickety peugeot bicycle ridden by a young man in a flat cap. So of course, the mayo contains only egg and oil, and perhaps some salt. Anything else would be doing a gross injustice to nos compatriotes.
Wow!  You should be writing menus for expensive restaurants.


I would, only all the restaurant menu writing jobs are taken by alcoholic poets wearing either a beret or a trenchcoat. It's the French AOC for menu writers, you see.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bo on August 17, 2011, 11:24:55 AM
I like Hellmann's.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: nicneufeld on August 17, 2011, 02:26:40 PM
I don't even go for BLTs in the first place...if I want a fresh tasting sandwich its vinegar and oil, lettuce, peppers, tomatoes, pickles, olives, and some sort of cured salami of sorts, and I'm good!

However my wife has a penchant for BLTs and has recently changed to preferring ranch dressing instead of mayonnaise.  But if you really like mayonnaise (you strange, strange people, you) I can see keeping it simple...BLTs are extremely simple and the more flavor you add the more it obscures the basic ingredients.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on August 17, 2011, 04:48:20 PM
I just picked a garden tomato that was still warm from the sun, sliced it thick

mmm, another simple pleasure in my book is a really sharp knife in the kitchen. 8)

The tomatoes are hand-delivered from the wicker pannier of a rickety peugeot bicycle ridden by a young man in a flat cap.

 :D, Awesomeness.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 17, 2011, 04:50:31 PM
Today is the 34th anniversary of the day I met my wife....that's a large joy!  (No, not her!)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: dbeechum on August 17, 2011, 04:54:50 PM
I like Hellmann's.

My stroe bought mayo of choice.

Although I must admit, it threw me for a loop when I first moved to the west coast and there was no Hellmann's. Then I did my research and started buying Best Foods.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: morticaixavier on August 17, 2011, 05:30:12 PM
I like Hellmann's.

My stroe bought mayo of choice.

Although I must admit, it threw me for a loop when I first moved to the west coast and there was no Hellmann's. Then I did my research and started buying Best Foods.

Tom robbins has a gleeful homage to best foods/hellmans in one of his short story collections wild ducks flying backwards i believe.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bo on August 17, 2011, 05:34:57 PM
I tried to make my own once but it was very runny and from a flavor standpoint, the Hellmann's every bit as good.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: morticaixavier on August 17, 2011, 05:46:29 PM
I tried to make my own once but it was very runny and from a flavor standpoint, the Hellmann's every bit as good.

keep trying! it can be amazing. just the options of lemon, or cider vinegar or... make it so much fun. It's all in the wrist.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bo on August 17, 2011, 05:48:22 PM
What's your secret to making it thick? I used a hand mixer.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: weithman5 on August 17, 2011, 05:52:02 PM
i used to make my own egg-yolk sauce like you get on your shrimp at the japanese steak houses.  some egg yolks. little vegetable oil and whisk the crap out of it. mmmmmmmm
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on August 17, 2011, 05:55:22 PM
My yolks are so orange
folks accuse me of really liking mustard.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: morticaixavier on August 17, 2011, 06:01:31 PM
What's your secret to making it thick? I used a hand mixer.

The first few times I made it I just used a big baloon whisk and it was nice and thick, not as think as hellmans but I think they mess around with it, plus I use olive oil instead of plain canola or what have you. I then tried to use the blender as this is supposed to be quick and easy and it kept breaking on me so I have come to the conclusion that the trick is not using electric mixers, I think they go to fast. a bottle of oil with some sort of flow control so you can get a thin drizzle coming out and a really energetic whisking hand. and a damp towel under the bowl so it doesn' t go flying. Start the emulsion with the egg yolk and whatever acid you are using then slowly (really really slowly at first) start with the oil while whisking.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bo on August 17, 2011, 06:08:18 PM
What's your secret to making it thick? I used a hand mixer.

The first few times I made it I just used a big baloon whisk and it was nice and thick, not as think as hellmans but I think they mess around with it, plus I use olive oil instead of plain canola or what have you. I then tried to use the blender as this is supposed to be quick and easy and it kept breaking on me so I have come to the conclusion that the trick is not using electric mixers, I think they go to fast. a bottle of oil with some sort of flow control so you can get a thin drizzle coming out and a really energetic whisking hand. and a damp towel under the bowl so it doesn' t go flying. Start the emulsion with the egg yolk and whatever acid you are using then slowly (really really slowly at first) start with the oil while whisking.

Thanks. I might give olive oil a try next time.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: denny on August 17, 2011, 06:33:45 PM
I then tried to use the blender as this is supposed to be quick and easy and it kept breaking on me so I have come to the conclusion that the trick is not using electric mixers, I think they go to fast.

I've been told that the problem with using a blender is the heat generated causes the mayo to break.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: bluesman on August 17, 2011, 06:40:30 PM
I recently made Salsa Fresca and Salsa Verde. I used fresh garden tomatoes, tomatillos,  peppers and red onions. Fresh Cilantro, and lime juice are the key indredients. Don't forget the salt and pepper. I love this time of year. Fall harvest is well on it's way.  :)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: corkybstewart on August 17, 2011, 07:02:10 PM
I recently made Salsa Fresca and Salsa Verde. I used fresh garden tomatoes, tomatillos,  peppers and red onions. Fresh Cilantro, and lime juice are the key indredients. Don't forget the salt and pepper. I love this time of year. Fall harvest is well on it's way.  :)
One of my favorite annual sensory experiences has started down here-the roasting of green chiles.  The harvest is starting early this year and the stores have started roasting sacks of  local chiles.  It's such a wonderful smell and it immediately brings back memories of fall in New Mexico,b y far our best season.  We always buy 2 bushels at a farm about 1/2 hour from here-we buy them off the tailgate of the pickup as they harvvest them, then we watch as they're roasted.  3 hours later they're vacuum sealed and in the freezer.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: euge on August 17, 2011, 07:07:35 PM
I do mayo in the food processor not the blender. Anyway, I usually can't be bothered and Duke's, Hellmann's and Kraft are every bit as good and last in the fridge longer than a week. :)

I make a batch of salsa nearly every day and take it and tortilla chips to work. My colleagues appreciate this though I get comments like "too pica" or "not pica enough" depending on who's doing the tasting.

Corky we should be seeing the Hatch chiles soon eh? Can't wait and I'm buying a metric-buttload when they start Hatch chile week. MY jalapeños are disappointingly mild this year and I want to freeze up a bunch of good hot peppers.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 17, 2011, 07:17:01 PM
...only some of us don't have the time to bask in 80 degree breezy sunshine and drink coconut milk all day...

Fermented coconut milk... hic    ;)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: corkybstewart on August 17, 2011, 08:23:46 PM
I do mayo in the food processor not the blender. Anyway, I usually can't be bothered and Duke's, Hellmann's and Kraft are every bit as good and last in the fridge longer than a week. :)

I make a batch of salsa nearly every day and take it and tortilla chips to work. My colleagues appreciate this though I get comments like "too pica" or "not pica enough" depending on who's doing the tasting.

Corky we should be seeing the Hatch chiles soon eh? Can't wait and I'm buying a metric-buttload when they start Hatch chile week. MY jalapeños are disappointingly mild this year and I want to freeze up a bunch of good hot peppers.
We've got Hatch chiles already, I always buy chile from Haldeman Farms in Artesia, NM.  They may not be better than Hatch, but they are just as good and are fresher.  Their Barkers will set you on fire, some years even their Big Jims and poblanos are very hot.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: gordonstrong on August 18, 2011, 12:49:50 AM
Careful of all olive oil in mayo.  It can have a strong taste.  Olive oil flavor varies, so it depends on what you use.  I normally use a blend of olive and canola, but I also use some white wine vinegar and dijon mustard.  It was a recipe from a Belgian cookbook.  Seems like it was pretty simple ratio-wise: 1 egg yolk, 1 Tbsp dijon, 1 tsp white wine vinegar, salt, white pepper, 1 cup oil.  I make it with a whisk, but I also have used a blender.  Whisk all the stuff except the oil until thoroughly mixed, add the oil drop by drop to get the emulsion started, and then a slow stream after a bit.  Taste and adjust seasoning at end -- very important, use your palate.  Egg yolks can vary, so they can handle variable amounts of oil.  You can also use lemon juice instead of white wine vinegar.  I've made this recipe dozens of times, sometimes adding some Penzey's sweet curry powder, especially when having them with Belgian frites.

I'll use Hellman's if I don't make my own.  Mostly I don't make my own if I don't know it's going to get all used.  When your minimum quantity is set by one egg yolk, you do wind up with over a cup of mayo from each batch.  Kind of a lot if all you are making is a sandwich.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: 1vertical on August 18, 2011, 08:45:40 PM
To me, there is nothing quite like finding the fabulous piece of nephrite laying there on the sod of the prairie.
Or the flush of fresh chanterelle mushrooms blazing orange against the earthen mat of the forest floor.  ::)

Altho a close second would be opening the package from Philamb containing the black perigord truffels he dug
from beneath his hazelnut tree and express mailed to me in BFEWhyo... ;)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 19, 2011, 08:12:00 AM
To me, there is nothing quite like finding the fabulous piece of nephrite laying there on the sod of the prairie.
Or the flush of fresh chanterelle mushrooms blazing orange against the earthen mat of the forest floor.  ::)

Altho a close second would be opening the package from Philamb containing the black perigord truffels he dug
from beneath his hazelnut tree and express mailed to me in BFEWhyo... ;)

even if I could send you truffles (which I don't think I can, import regulations being what they are) I 1. wouldn't trust the workers at USPS to not destroy or steal the thing and 2. wouldn't send you one anyway because they cost 10 euros per gram. I am, however, happy for you to come over here and visit and I will cook for you something with truffles in it.  ;D
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: 1vertical on August 19, 2011, 02:19:26 PM
even if I could send you truffles (which I don't think I can, import regulations being what they are) I 1. wouldn't trust the workers at USPS to not destroy or steal the thing

1vertical bends over double with the blow philamb just delivered to his nether regions and his co-workers.....
small joys beaten down to the size of quarks
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on August 19, 2011, 02:42:49 PM
 :D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: 1vertical on August 19, 2011, 02:50:01 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
You are so correct and I do have a source for Black Perigords here in the good ole US...
I just cannot imagine the terrible experience Phil must have endured to reflect that opinion....
I would love to give him a tour of a USPS facility and elighten him...they even have
welding hood viewing galleries surrounding the work area so inspectors can do voyouristic
anonymous things at all times...or any time ....no one knows but the inspectors.  We are
heavily watched for sure....Misrouting...happens....stealing usually not..
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: morticaixavier on August 19, 2011, 03:10:50 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
You are so correct and I do have a source for Black Perigords here in the good ole US...
I just cannot imagine the terrible experience Phil must have endured to reflect that opinion....
I would love to give him a tour of a USPS facility and elighten him...they even have
welding hood viewing galleries surrounding the work area so inspectors can do voyouristic
anonymous things at all times...or any time ....no one knows but the inspectors.  We are
heavily watched for sure....Misrouting...happens....stealing usually not..

Yea!!! I love the the USPS! I will start complaining about you guys when there is another way to send a letter 3000 miles away for 42 cents! Just wish I could mail beer.

Although a friend once told me a story of when he worked fo the USPS in the 60's and came across a package mailed from afganistan that 'wieghed about 2 pounds and smelled suspicous' the paper was torn and he liberated it before the inspectors could. In that case I suspect he saved some kid a lot of trouble though so maybe not all bad.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: phillamb168 on August 19, 2011, 03:26:32 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
You are so correct and I do have a source for Black Perigords here in the good ole US...
I just cannot imagine the terrible experience Phil must have endured to reflect that opinion....
I would love to give him a tour of a USPS facility and elighten him...they even have
welding hood viewing galleries surrounding the work area so inspectors can do voyouristic
anonymous things at all times...or any time ....no one knows but the inspectors.  We are
heavily watched for sure....Misrouting...happens....stealing usually not..

My comments were indeed generalized, for that I apologize. I have had absolutely atrocious experiences with the post offices in NYC and Chicago. Never, ever a good experience, not a single time. The best is that I get the stink eye (as opposed to "hello") and the worst was the time I was yelled at (yes, for real) for not filling out a form correctly. And yep, in both NYC and Chicago I've been delivered letters that had been opened (like you would a normal envelope, not like something that would happen by accident in a sorting machine) and re-sealed with tape. Typically greeting cards.

Of course, La Poste in France isn't much better, but just like the US it depends on the branch. My local is very nice, but the one time I tried to send a package (of beer) to the US from a branch in Paris, the lady at the counter insulted me several times and joked to her coworkers about my grammatical mistakes.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: corkybstewart on August 19, 2011, 03:57:19 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*

Of course, La Poste in France isn't much better, but just like the US it depends on the branch. My local is very nice, but the one time I tried to send a package (of beer) to the US from a branch in Paris, the lady at the counter insulted me several times and joked to her coworkers about my grammatical mistakes.
Parisans are forced to study rudeness in the Modern Age from age 10 until they get out of school.  I can go anywhere in France and being treated with kindness and respect, even given my incredibly unique(bad) version of French.  But once we get in the Paris area everybody treats us like 3-headed mutants.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on August 19, 2011, 04:53:16 PM
...in Paris, the lady at the counter insulted me several times and joked to her coworkers about my grammatical mistakes.

Is that not de rigueur?
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on September 01, 2011, 10:25:44 AM
joie de vivre (http://vimeo.com/channels/1341#28010797)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: akr71 on September 01, 2011, 12:14:34 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
You are so correct and I do have a source for Black Perigords here in the good ole US...
I just cannot imagine the terrible experience Phil must have endured to reflect that opinion....
I would love to give him a tour of a USPS facility and elighten him...they even have
welding hood viewing galleries surrounding the work area so inspectors can do voyouristic
anonymous things at all times...or any time ....no one knows but the inspectors.  We are
heavily watched for sure....Misrouting...happens....stealing usually not..

I gained a newfound respect for the global postal system this spring.  I ordered a refractometer from eBay - it came from Hong Kong and arrived safe and sound... in an inter-office envelope!  You know, the kind that are held closed with a string wound around two paper disks.
 :o
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: pinnah on September 01, 2011, 06:29:34 PM


Last week I was lamenting the fact that we had not seen any big sheep,
and the next morning we topped out at this lake at the back of the cirque
and found this on the shore.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/ramssculllake.jpg)

Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: Slowbrew on September 01, 2011, 06:44:06 PM
:D, I am sure poor philamb did not realize you are a honored member of the USPS force.
truffle schmuffle, head out and find yourself some new world chantys that reek of apricots. :-*
You are so correct and I do have a source for Black Perigords here in the good ole US...
I just cannot imagine the terrible experience Phil must have endured to reflect that opinion....
I would love to give him a tour of a USPS facility and elighten him...they even have
welding hood viewing galleries surrounding the work area so inspectors can do voyouristic
anonymous things at all times...or any time ....no one knows but the inspectors.  We are
heavily watched for sure....Misrouting...happens....stealing usually not..

I gained a newfound respect for the global postal system this spring.  I ordered a refractometer from eBay - it came from Hong Kong and arrived safe and sound... in an inter-office envelope!  You know, the kind that are held closed with a string wound around two paper disks.
 :o

When I was managing the service department of a Clone PC manufacturer back in the '90s we trusted the USPS more than UPS or FedEx. 

On more than occasion UPS would return a computer "that was packed well enough".  One of these boxes had tandem wheel tracks right down the middle of the box.  I asked how them explain how to pack a box so their trucks could drive over it and have the machine inside survive.  Had to fight that damage insurance claim for 6 months.

Fed Ex returned a machine that said was damaged in transit because of lack of packaging.  One of their drivers had dumped a semi-trailer in a river in Colorado.  They wrapped the system in stretchy plastic and tried to deliver it.  The customer refused it (obviously) and FedEx dumped it in my lap for "poor packaging".  Another 6 months of fighting with an insurance inspector.

Never had those issues with USPS.

Paul
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: punatic on September 01, 2011, 08:56:07 PM
When I was managing the service department of a Clone PC manufacturer back in the '90s we trusted the USPS more than UPS or FedEx.  

On more than occasion UPS would return a computer "that was packed well enough".  One of these boxes had tandem wheel tracks right down the middle of the box.  I asked how them explain how to pack a box so their trucks could drive over it and have the machine inside survive.  Had to fight that damage insurance claim for 6 months.

Fed Ex returned a machine that said was damaged in transit because of lack of packaging.  One of their drivers had dumped a semi-trailer in a river in Colorado.  They wrapped the system in stretchy plastic and tried to deliver it.  The customer refused it (obviously) and FedEx dumped it in my lap for "poor packaging".  Another 6 months of fighting with an insurance inspector.


I ALWAYS use HDS (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DUWmeRLVRw)
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: maxieboy on September 02, 2011, 01:28:32 AM


Last week I was lamenting the fact that we had not seen any big sheep,
and the next morning we topped out at this lake at the back of the cirque
and found this on the shore.

(http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c30/pinnah/ramssculllake.jpg)



Awesome pic! Almost a full curl. The old boy is resting in a beautiful spot...
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: corkybstewart on September 02, 2011, 07:11:41 AM
After a few days in what looked to me like a coma my FIL decided it was not time to die so Monday afternoon he started to wake up a little, Tuesday he was fairly irritated at the world, and by Wednesday he was absolutely furious at everybody, especially the 100 kilo nurse (Mdm Bouchet)who tried to insert a hose larger than his anus causing him much pain and anguish.  Of course nobody at the hospital knows a nurse of that size or name but that didn't stop him from complaining.  So now that he's alive we're about to get on a plane back to the good old US of A. 
We actually had a pretty good time, drank way too much good wine and ate too much.  I put 6 Orvals into the wine cave to drink over the next few visits.  It'll be interesting to see how they change over the years.  The cave stays 46F with 90% humidity so it should be a great place to age beer.
Title: Re: Sharing small joys
Post by: euge on September 02, 2011, 07:30:25 AM
You hadn't posted in a while. But you were in France... Glad the FIL is pulling through. That kinda thing is incredibly stressful.