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General Category => General Homebrew Discussion => Topic started by: garyg on October 18, 2011, 09:06:46 PM

Title: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: garyg on October 18, 2011, 09:06:46 PM
AHA Governing Committee member and AHA Forum & BrewTechTalk Moderator is now taking questions on batch sparging equipment and techniques through October 24 for the AHA's Ask The Experts.

Questions need to be submitted to: asktheexperts@brewersassociation.org

Answers will be posted within a couple of weeks after the completion of the submission period. You will need to be registered as an AHA member on HomebrewersAssociation.org to access the posted questions and answers.

You can see the Q & A from our past guest experts at www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/lets-brew/ask-the-experts.

Denny's Bio
Denny Conn has been homebrewing for more than 14 years in the foothills of the Coast Range Mountains in Oregon. He is an audio engineer by trade, but that’s just to finance the brewing. Denny did about six extract batches before switching to all-grain and discovering the “Cheap’n’Easy” batch sparge brewing technique. He’s a BJCP National Judge and his Rye IPA recipe has been brewed both by Rogue Ales in the U.S. and Olfabrikken in Denmark. He also has written articles for brewing magazines, is a frequent contributor to many internet beer discussion forums and was a speaker at the 2008 and 2010 AHA conferences. He’s the Tech Tsar of the Cascade Brewers Society, based in Eugene, Ore.

Thanks for taking this on Denny!

Cheers!
Gary
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: maxieboy on October 18, 2011, 10:39:45 PM
Denny who?  ;D
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: theDarkSide on October 19, 2011, 12:56:48 PM
Denny who?  ;D

This guy?

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQvz8myXL2IwjcqtTBVgDngooG5y9BlZd3abP9cVt7X4wOFivG0bnG1tHtpQA)

I didn't know his first name was Denny  ;D

Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: tubercle on October 19, 2011, 11:41:17 PM
Denny who?  ;D

 Is that the guy with the cooler and braid thing? A pragmatic sort of fellow I understand.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: skyler on October 20, 2011, 08:32:33 PM
Isn't the AHA forum always an "ask Denny Conn" forum?
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: Slowbrew on October 20, 2011, 08:53:30 PM
Denny who?  ;D

This guy?

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQvz8myXL2IwjcqtTBVgDngooG5y9BlZd3abP9cVt7X4wOFivG0bnG1tHtpQA)

I didn't know his first name was Denny  ;D



I saw his picture in Zymurgy a couple of issues ago.  He must be buying hair gel by the barrel to keep this look going.  Where's his tie?  ;D

Paul
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: punatic on October 20, 2011, 09:07:02 PM
Denny Conn Noonien Singh
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: James Lorden on October 20, 2011, 09:09:58 PM
Dear Denny,

What was the thinking behind changing your avatar from George Carlin to that guy from Spinal Tap?

Your adoring fan,

James
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: majorvices on October 26, 2011, 05:32:42 PM
Dear Denny,

What was the thinking behind changing your avatar from George Carlin to that guy from Spinal Tap?

Your adoring fan,

James

BAWAHAHAHA!!! Too damn funny!!!
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: denny on October 26, 2011, 10:10:46 PM
Dear Denny,

What was the thinking behind changing your avatar from George Carlin to that guy from Spinal Tap?

Your adoring fan,

James

+1!

BAWAHAHAHA!!! Too damn funny!!!
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: chumley on November 02, 2011, 03:06:53 PM
Dear Denny:

I want to make a passion fruit wheat honey ale with Ringwood yeast.  What temperature should I ferment the beer to maximize the fruity esters?

Your friend,
chumley
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: denny on November 02, 2011, 04:03:25 PM
Dear Denny:

I want to make a passion fruit wheat honey ale with Ringwood yeast.  What temperature should I ferment the beer to maximize the fruity esters?

Your friend,
chumley

Dear Chumster,

As you realize, you're brewing one of my favorite styles with my all time favorite yeast.  I recommend you ferment at 130F for 6 months.  Th serve, pour the beer on your lawn, then open a PBR.

Good luck, you'll need it....

Denny
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: pinnah on November 02, 2011, 05:02:12 PM
 :D, don't forget the Fuggles!
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: central_wa_brewing on November 03, 2011, 02:50:58 AM
Oh no, Denny loves his Nugget....btw Denny, did you ever get that hop irradicated from your yard?
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: denny on November 03, 2011, 03:54:50 AM
Oh no, Denny loves his Nugget....btw Denny, did you ever get that hop irradicated from your yard?

It dies back a little more each year, but it's still there.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: ibru on December 06, 2011, 03:10:15 PM
Denny (expert)
The recipe for your Bourbon Vanilla Porter calls for the vanilla beans to be scraped. Why and what do you do with the "scrapings"?

I put the scrapings and the hulls into the beer. It's a month old and starting to taste pretty good....
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: denny on December 06, 2011, 03:29:31 PM
Denny (expert)
The recipe for your Bourbon Vanilla Porter calls for the vanilla beans to be scraped. Why and what do you do with the "scrapings"?

I put the scrapings and the hulls into the beer. It's a month old and starting to taste pretty good....

You did the right thing!  I guess I just assumed people are familiar with how to use vanilla beans in cooking, but I've found that that's not always true.  Most of the flavor in vanilla beans comes from the "gunk" inside them.  By splitting them lengthwise and scraping that out, you get the greatest effect from them.  But, as you point out, the pod itself has flavor and should be used, also.  Those suckers are expensive and you don't want to waste anything!
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: garyg on December 06, 2011, 04:46:56 PM
Denny's Ask The Experts Q & A is now posted: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/lets-brew/ask-the-experts.

Thanks Denny!
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: punatic on December 06, 2011, 06:34:52 PM
But, as you point out, the pod itself has flavor and should be used, also.  Those suckers are expensive and you don't want to waste anything!

They grow on trees around here (actually the orchids that produce the pods grow on trees around here).   :D

I put my spent vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar.  After a week or two you have vanilla-sugar.  (Thank you for the idea Chef Emeril).
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: morticaixavier on December 06, 2011, 06:50:02 PM
But, as you point out, the pod itself has flavor and should be used, also.  Those suckers are expensive and you don't want to waste anything!

They grow on trees around here (actually the orchids that produce the pods grow on trees around here).   :D

I put my spent vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar.  After a week or two you have vanilla-sugar.  (Thank you for the idea Chef Emeril).

Can you harvest and cure those pods Carl? I have wanted to grow and harvest vanilla for years but have not lived in a climate where it is practical or even been able to find an ochid to try and grow indoors. From what I understand it's actually a pretty easy orchid to grow as these things go. The curing process is long and laborious but so is brewing so...
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: denny on December 06, 2011, 07:08:39 PM
But, as you point out, the pod itself has flavor and should be used, also.  Those suckers are expensive and you don't want to waste anything!

They grow on trees around here (actually the orchids that produce the pods grow on trees around here).   :D

I put my spent vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar.  After a week or two you have vanilla-sugar.  (Thank you for the idea Chef Emeril).

Carl, have you been here?  www.hawaiianvanilla.com  My sister and her husband sometimes work there doing tours and marketing.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: richardt on December 06, 2011, 08:45:29 PM
I have wanted to grow and harvest vanilla for years but have not lived in a climate where it is practical or even been able to find an ochid to try and grow indoors. From what I understand it's actually a pretty easy orchid to grow as these things go. The curing process is long and laborious but so is brewing so...

You do have your work cut out for you--the flowers bloom in the am and just last for a day. 
They must be hand-pollinated (toothpick or bevelled bamboo).
The tiny black seeds are flavorless--the flavor comes from the remainder of the fruit (pod and pith).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla)
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: morticaixavier on December 06, 2011, 09:09:06 PM
I have wanted to grow and harvest vanilla for years but have not lived in a climate where it is practical or even been able to find an ochid to try and grow indoors. From what I understand it's actually a pretty easy orchid to grow as these things go. The curing process is long and laborious but so is brewing so...

You do have your work cut out for you--the flowers bloom in the am and just last for a day. 
They must be hand-pollinated (toothpick or bevelled bamboo).
The tiny black seeds are flavorless--the flavor comes from the remainder of the fruit (pod and pith).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla)

Not only are the seeds flavourless but at harvest time the whole pod is more or less flavourless. it takes a verly long involved curing process to make it into Vanilla. Traditionally it is sweated and 'fermented' thorugh a process of exposing it to hot sun during the day and then covering with blankets at night. can take weeks.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: tschmidlin on December 06, 2011, 09:56:29 PM
Not only are the seeds flavourless but at harvest time the whole pod is more or less flavourless. it takes a verly long involved curing process to make it into Vanilla. Traditionally it is sweated and 'fermented' thorugh a process of exposing it to hot sun during the day and then covering with blankets at night. can take weeks.
And yet i suspect most of us would try it if we had some growing in our yards and had the right climate for it :)
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: morticaixavier on December 06, 2011, 11:43:19 PM
Not only are the seeds flavourless but at harvest time the whole pod is more or less flavourless. it takes a verly long involved curing process to make it into Vanilla. Traditionally it is sweated and 'fermented' thorugh a process of exposing it to hot sun during the day and then covering with blankets at night. can take weeks.
And yet i suspect most of us would try it if we had some growing in our yards and had the right climate for it :)

yup. ludites! gotta do it all ourselves. I heard an interesting term the other day 'recombinant food' which describes 'recipes' made up of other, already complete foodstuffs. Such as rice krispy treats and anything containing a can of mushroom soup.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: punatic on December 07, 2011, 07:52:18 AM
My vanilla orchids are the free-range kind.  A friend who grows them commercially gave me some cuttings a few years ago.  I followed her advice and just laid them (one each) in the crotches of ohia trees, and they took off like wildfire.  No roots in soil.  Just natural compost that collects in the V formed by the branching trunks.  I have five growing.  Living here getting things to grow is not the problem.  Keeping things from growing out of control is a lot of work.  We have a saying, "In Hawaii you can plant a broom handle and grow a broom tree."

There are no natural pollenators here, so the tough part is pollenating the flowers by hand.  Actually, once you get the hang of it pollenating is not so hard.  It's catching the flowers at the right time for pollenation that is challenging.  One must remain vigilant.  The window for pollenation is only a few hours long.

Mort is correct.  The drying and flavor developing process takes several months.  Comparible to the time and effort put into brewing lambics, I would say.

Denny - I know of the Hawaiian Vanilla Company, but have not been to their farm.  I work with quite a few farmers on the Hamakua Coast.  My lab does bacterialogical testing for food safety certification. (total coliform - E. coli).  I bring home a lot of free exotic tropical produce.  People are experimenting with new crops since sugarcane has gone away.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: phillamb168 on December 07, 2011, 12:16:09 PM
My vanilla orchids are the free-range kind.  A friend who grows them commercially gave me some cuttings a few years ago.  I followed her advice and just laid them (one each) in the crotches of ohia trees, and they took off like wildfire.  No roots in soil.  Just natural compost that collects in the V formed by the branching trunks.  I have five growing.  Living here getting things to grow is not the problem.  Keeping things from growing out of control is a lot of work.  We have a saying, "In Hawaii you can plant a broom handle and grow a broom tree."

There are no natural pollenators here, so the tough part is pollenating the flowers by hand.  Actually, once you get the hang of it pollenating is not so hard.  It's catching the flowers at the right time for pollenation that is challenging.  One must remain vigilant.  The window for pollenation is only a few hours long.

Mort is correct.  The drying and flavor developing process takes several months.  Comparible to the time and effort put into brewing lambics, I would say.

Denny - I know of the Hawaiian Vanilla Company, but have not been to their farm.  I work with quite a few farmers on the Hamakua Coast.  My lab does bacterialogical testing for food safety certification. (total coliform - E. coli).  I bring home a lot of free exotic tropical produce.  People are experimenting with new crops since sugarcane has gone away.

What happened to the sugarcane?
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: morticaixavier on December 07, 2011, 03:33:55 PM
My vanilla orchids are the free-range kind.  A friend who grows them commercially gave me some cuttings a few years ago.  I followed her advice and just laid them (one each) in the crotches of ohia trees, and they took off like wildfire.  No roots in soil.  Just natural compost that collects in the V formed by the branching trunks.  I have five growing.  Living here getting things to grow is not the problem.  Keeping things from growing out of control is a lot of work.  We have a saying, "In Hawaii you can plant a broom handle and grow a broom tree."

There are no natural pollenators here, so the tough part is pollenating the flowers by hand.  Actually, once you get the hang of it pollenating is not so hard.  It's catching the flowers at the right time for pollenation that is challenging.  One must remain vigilant.  The window for pollenation is only a few hours long.

Mort is correct.  The drying and flavor developing process takes several months.  Comparible to the time and effort put into brewing lambics, I would say.

Denny - I know of the Hawaiian Vanilla Company, but have not been to their farm.  I work with quite a few farmers on the Hamakua Coast.  My lab does bacterialogical testing for food safety certification. (total coliform - E. coli).  I bring home a lot of free exotic tropical produce.  People are experimenting with new crops since sugarcane has gone away.

What happened to the sugarcane?

priced out of the market by cheaper south american sources. still a couple operations going on there though. When I was on maui you could smell the refineries once in a while.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: punatic on December 07, 2011, 04:39:46 PM
What happened to the sugarcane?

Hawaiian cane growers lost their Federal subsidies.  Without that, producing sugar in the middle of the Pacific ocean was no longer competitive.

There is still one cane company operating in Maui.  I buy their turbinato sugar and evaporated cane juice.

The smell of cane processing is not a pleasant one.
Title: Re: Ask The Experts: Denny Conn
Post by: rblack90 on August 22, 2012, 04:32:56 AM
+1 for an Audio Engineer!