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General Category => All Grain Brewing => Topic started by: gymrat on November 03, 2011, 02:03:40 PM

Title: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 03, 2011, 02:03:40 PM
I did a search on this before asking on the forum. Nothing came up so if I am rehashing an old thread please let me know and point me to it.

This will be my first winter all grain brewing. I did extracts the last two winters. My concern is the need to steep my grains in the cold, and how to cool my wort without a chiller (the garden hose will be put away).

I have a small unattached garage that I will be using for my brewery. I use a Rubbermaid 10 gallon cooler for a mash tun. Will that maintain the temperatures I need for an hour on a cold day? And for cooling the wort, should I just put the lid on my kettle and let it sit in the cold? Maybe put it outside to get the wind to blow on it? Stir it frequently?

Would I be better off switching back to extract brewing until the weather warms up?

I am open to advice and suggestions.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Jimmy K on November 03, 2011, 02:21:17 PM
The grains will barely notice being mashed in the cold. Those coolers are well insulated.

For chilling, why don't you just get the garden hose out? The water will be nice and cold, making chilling a breeze.  Otherwise - during the summer I fill my HLT with water and ice and run that through the chiller. Once at an event without running water, I did the same and used a small pump to pump icewater through the chiller and back into the ice.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 03, 2011, 02:26:30 PM
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: bo on November 03, 2011, 02:28:13 PM
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?

Hot Liquor Tank
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Jimmy K on November 03, 2011, 02:40:21 PM
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?

Understandable. I have a freeze-proof outdoor faucet that I connect my hose to for brewing. Then disconnect and drain it when I'm done.

Putting it in a tub of cold water and stiring will cool it relatively quickly. Fill the tub well before brewing and the water will be nice and cold.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tom on November 03, 2011, 04:54:59 PM
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?
Understandable. I have a freeze-proof outdoor faucet that I connect my hose to for brewing. Then disconnect and drain it when I'm done.
+1.  I bring the hose inside the night before brewday.  Then I empty it and turn off the spigots again.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: beersk on November 03, 2011, 06:31:55 PM
Bring your kettle inside and chill at the kitchen sink.  I've done that before.  That or do partial mash stovetop brews and chill in an ice bath.  You can still make top notch beers using that method.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Delo on November 03, 2011, 07:08:01 PM
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?

Understandable. I have a freeze-proof outdoor faucet that I connect my hose to for brewing. Then disconnect and drain it when I'm done.

Putting it in a tub of cold water and stiring will cool it relatively quickly. Fill the tub well before brewing and the water will be nice and cold.

+1 I have a small garden hose I keep with my brewing equipment for the same type of setup. Its a lot easier than lugging a full length hose around. My outdoor faucet isnt freeze-proof so I set everything up and turn the water on/off from the shutoff valve in our basement. Then I break everything down and bring it inside.  I've tried cooling down a 5 gallon batch in a snow bank in cold weather with no chiller. It takes a lot longer to cool than one would think. It works for me but Im sure our winters in NJ probably arent as cold as where you are. 
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Kit B on November 03, 2011, 07:57:28 PM
I mash in the house.
Boil in the garage.
Chill with a garden hose discharging into my kitchen sink, rather than my lawn or driveway.

I really hope I can finish my basement brewery, before winter hits.
It gets f-ing cold, in Minnesota.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Slowbrew on November 03, 2011, 08:05:51 PM
I mash in the house.
Boil in the garage.
Chill with a garden hose discharging into my kitchen sink, rather than my lawn or driveway.

I really hope I can finish my basement brewery, before winter hits.
It gets f-ing cold, in Minnesota.


Pretty much the same for me.

I mash in my basement shop (walk-out)
Boil on the concrete slab outside
Chill in our old laundry room

It works like a champ.  Add in the remote thermometer and I only go outside to light the burner and move water in or out.

Paul
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: a10t2 on November 03, 2011, 08:16:10 PM
I ran out of beer last winter, so I had to do a partial boil on the stove and top off with ice to chill/dilute. I don't think there are any major benefits to a full boil for an average-gravity beer.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 03, 2011, 10:03:47 PM
I would probably use water from a sink.  You can get a hose adapter and run the hose out a window to wherever you are brewing.  Then stuff a towel around it to seal up the cracks.  And when you're done, drain the hose and put it away.

Sean makes a good point about doing a partial boil inside and calling it good, that's another way you can go.  Or just brew a ton now while it isn't minus eleventy outside, and spend those cold winter days sipping homebrew and working on recipes.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 03, 2011, 10:44:36 PM
How do you do a partial boil with an all grain brew? Do you not sparge?
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: a10t2 on November 03, 2011, 10:46:59 PM
How do you do a partial boil with an all grain brew? Do you not sparge?

Obviously it depends to some extent on the boil volume, but for the most part you'd have to do a no-sparge.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: euge on November 04, 2011, 06:50:50 AM
I think Tom's suggestion is elegant and simple. And easily doable.

In the summer I boil on the stove and run the hoses in from outside to the IC and drain back outside through the sprinkler. Kinda the reverse of what he is saying.

As far as partial and short boils go I am a big supporter of that. Usually my longest hop addition is 45 minutes and I don't mind topping up either.

Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: punatic on November 04, 2011, 07:12:06 AM
You could move to Hawaii and brew here.   ;)

When I lived in Florida and brewed in the winter I used to place the wort kettle (covered) on the second step in the swimming pool, and let it cool by convection.  The pool water was in the mid 50s and would cool the wort to pitching temp in an hour or so.

The snow bank, or just let it sit outside ideas are sound.  Be sure to monitor the wort temp.  The cooling fluid temps are much lower than your target wort temp.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: beersk on November 04, 2011, 02:18:51 PM
I ran out of beer last winter, so I had to do a partial boil on the stove and top off with ice to chill/dilute. I don't think there are any major benefits to a full boil for an average-gravity beer.
I'm surprised that you said that, being the experienced brewer that you are.


Another suggestion would be that you could do smaller batches.  I do 3.5 gallon all grain batches stove top, still keg in 5 gallon kegs.  It's pretty awesome.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: lazydog79 on November 05, 2011, 02:13:37 AM
All this confirms my opinion - outdoor brewing in the winter is a B*TCH!  I usually try to get my last one in around Thanksgiving-ish and brew enough before that so I will be good until March or so.  Winter is for working on projects, next year's calendar, and recipes.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Pawtucket Patriot on November 05, 2011, 12:00:53 PM
I mash in the house.
Boil in the garage.
Chill with a garden hose discharging into my kitchen sink, rather than my lawn or driveway.

I really hope I can finish my basement brewery, before winter hits.
It gets f-ing cold, in Minnesota.


This is my process all year round. Mash in the kitchen, boil in the garage, chill in the basement laundry room.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: jeffy on November 05, 2011, 12:10:04 PM
Of course its just the opposite here.  It's much more difficult to stand over a boiling kettle in the summer when it is 90 degrees out, so winter is brewing season in Florida.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: seajellie on November 05, 2011, 01:17:49 PM
gymrat, my only concern for you and winter brewing, is that it's just not cold enough in Kansas  ;D

Winter in Michigan is my main brewing season, and although it can be a hassle, it has multiple benefits:

a) Super easy to cool off ten gallons of wort to lager pitching temps with even a small chiller
b) Use a cheap pond pump to circulate snow-water through the chiller
c) No fruit flies, and the general airborne presence of microbes is small
d) Which makes it safer to do things like rack to the fermenter outside (covered big shed) and aerate out there, further dropping wort temp
d) My cellar gets down to 50 and stays there for months, so between the fridge and the cellar I have lots of options
e) It's winter, what else am I going to do between shoveling the sidewalk; take up ice fishing again?

I don't really need the outdoor tap, but I usually use it. As others said, keep the hose inside overnight. When you are done with the spigot, close it off and let it drain. Not had a problem in four years of this strategy.

As other have said, if you have a good cooler, your mash temps will hold surprisingly well. My best cooler wrapped in an old Coleman sleeping bag or two hardly drops more than a couple degrees in an hour even at 10 F outside.

On the other hand.. it does take more propane, and I sure could use all that heat inside the house - so I often do what others have mentioned, downsize and go to the kitchen stove depending on mood.

Watch out for ice patches!

Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 05, 2011, 02:01:55 PM
Seajellie I like how you only see the positives. Thankyou that was helpful. I will look into a pond pump.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: suds on November 05, 2011, 02:23:16 PM
In the winter I'll brew in the garage and bring the kettle inside to the laundry room sink to run water through the chiller.  The 10 gallon cooler will be fine for holding the mash within 2-3 degrees in your garage. 

If you don't have a good place inside to run water for chilling, you could explore the possibility of no chill brewing for the winter.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 05, 2011, 02:40:10 PM
Suds I was thinking I might have to explore that option. But the other suggestion of a cheap pond pump sounds good too. I saw some at lowes.com for $20

Problem with brewing outdoors and chilling indoors is that after 3 hernia surgeries I really don't want to carry a pot with 5 gallons of liquid in it.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: malzig on November 05, 2011, 03:21:18 PM
It's cold here in the winter, which makes it a great time of year to brew Alts and Lagers.  I do most of my brewing from the fall through spring.  One alternative, the one that I use when it gets too cold to brew outside, is to make 3 to 3.5 gallon AG batches on my kitchen stove.  That's just about the upper limit I can hit and still get a proper boil.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: gymrat on November 05, 2011, 05:28:01 PM
It's cold here in the winter, which makes it a great time of year to brew Alts and Lagers.  I do most of my brewing from the fall through spring.  One alternative, the one that I use when it gets too cold to brew outside, is to make 3 to 3.5 gallon AG batches on my kitchen stove.  That's just about the upper limit I can hit and still get a proper boil.

Thats my limit as well. That is the size of the boils I was doing when I did extract brewing. I thought about just extract brewing through the winter but I have a back log of grain I would like to use while it is fresh.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: morticaixavier on November 07, 2011, 04:12:33 PM
So I started to think about this thread while preasure canning some wort for later starter use and I had an idea.

When the weather is more amenable to brewing outdoors why not brew up a batch of insanely strong wort (1.2 or so) and then can it in half gallon jars and stick them in the pantry. Then, in the winter when you want to brew up a batch whip out a couple half gallons of 1.2 wort and either do a partial boil or dilute and do a full boil. Two jars of 1.200 wort should get you about 5 gallons of 1.040 or three jars would get you 5 gallons of 1.060.

Just a thought.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2011, 05:12:52 PM
So I started to think about this thread while preasure canning some wort for later starter use and I had an idea.

When the weather is more amenable to brewing outdoors why not brew up a batch of insanely strong wort (1.2 or so) and then can it in half gallon jars and stick them in the pantry. Then, in the winter when you want to brew up a batch whip out a couple half gallons of 1.2 wort and either do a partial boil or dilute and do a full boil. Two jars of 1.200 wort should get you about 5 gallons of 1.040 or three jars would get you 5 gallons of 1.060.

Just a thought.
So you're saying "why not make your own extract to use later?" ;)
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: morticaixavier on November 07, 2011, 05:23:34 PM
So I started to think about this thread while preasure canning some wort for later starter use and I had an idea.

When the weather is more amenable to brewing outdoors why not brew up a batch of insanely strong wort (1.2 or so) and then can it in half gallon jars and stick them in the pantry. Then, in the winter when you want to brew up a batch whip out a couple half gallons of 1.2 wort and either do a partial boil or dilute and do a full boil. Two jars of 1.200 wort should get you about 5 gallons of 1.040 or three jars would get you 5 gallons of 1.060.

Just a thought.
So you're saying "why not make your own extract to use later?" ;)

yeah exactly, except, unless you have a vacuum evaporator you probably don't want to reduce it to a syrup. Hey we are homebrewers after all.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2011, 05:25:50 PM
So you're saying "why not make your own extract to use later?" ;)

yeah exactly, except, unless you have a vacuum evaporator you probably don't want to reduce it to a syrup. Hey we are homebrewers after all.
[/quote]
I think it's a pretty good idea, you still retain full control over the wort but you 'll have to expect some darkening.  I'm not sure it is worth the effort, but I have different circumstances.  I'm really glad that I don't have problems brewing in the winter :)
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: morticaixavier on November 07, 2011, 05:28:01 PM
So you're saying "why not make your own extract to use later?" ;)

yeah exactly, except, unless you have a vacuum evaporator you probably don't want to reduce it to a syrup. Hey we are homebrewers after all.
I think it's a pretty good idea, you still retain full control over the wort but you 'll have to expect some darkening.  I'm not sure it is worth the effort, but I have different circumstances.  I'm really glad that I don't have problems brewing in the winter :)
[/quote]

yeah, I think about what it would be like if I still lived in VT and had gotten this obessed with brewing. I don't think I would have gotten into all grain to the extent that I have which would be a bummer as I really enjoy the process. Brewing out doors at -10f does not sound fun. I can see myself hugging the kettle while trying to avoid setting myself on fire.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: ckpash88 on November 07, 2011, 05:29:54 PM
If you wanted to brew 2.5 gallon batches to save space so you can do it inside how big would you want your mash tun to be for a average gravity beer?

Bc i have thought of doing this so i can have a faster turn over and experiment more and be able to do it in the winter. I live in MN and even in my garage its 40 degrees during the winter gets a little cold
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2011, 05:34:25 PM
I built a 1-gallon setup for doing some little batches, it was cheap and easy.  I use a 2 gallon round cooler as a mash tun.  I think for an average gravity beer, mash tun volume can equal batch size and you'll be fine.  A 2 gallon cooler will probably be fine for a 2.5 gallon batch too.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: morticaixavier on November 07, 2011, 05:36:07 PM
If you wanted to brew 2.5 gallon batches to save space so you can do it inside how big would you want your mash tun to be for a average gravity beer?

Bc i have thought of doing this so i can have a faster turn over and experiment more and be able to do it in the winter. I live in MN and even in my garage its 40 degrees during the winter gets a little cold

well lets see, when I do an average gravity 5 gallon batch in my 72 qt coleman it is less that half full so I would think you could get away with around 20 qt size. I started with all grain with a grain bag suspended in a 7 gallon bottling bucket indoors and that worked for average gravity 5 gallon batches so it would be fine for a 2.5 gallon batch.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Alewyfe on November 07, 2011, 06:19:06 PM
Seajellie I like how you only see the positives. Thankyou that was helpful. I will look into a pond pump.

+1   Duh!  Why didn't I think of that. You have just solved my problem which is getting my wort cool enough in the summertime.
We pull from the river to a gravity fed water system and in the summer I can never get my wort cool enough. I will rig my chiller
to an ice bucket with a little pond pump. I just saw one online for about $15.

Thanks for the idea.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: ckpash88 on November 07, 2011, 06:21:18 PM
You were making one gallon batches? Our had a one gallon mash run?
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Kit B on November 07, 2011, 08:47:07 PM
You can get a hose adapter and run the hose out a window to wherever you are brewing...

Only if you want a skating rink, Tom.

Of course its just the opposite here.  It's much more difficult to stand over a boiling kettle in the summer when it is 90 degrees out, so winter is brewing season in Florida.

Oddly enough, the 90 degree days in Minnesota are when we do the most outdoor brewing.
Temperatures here swing from roughly 100F in the height of summer to -50F (sometimes colder) in the dead of winter.
It's a harsh place to live, but I wouldn't choose to live anywhere else.

Hawaii's just so damn expensive!
 :D
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 07, 2011, 09:20:59 PM
You were making one gallon batches? Our had a one gallon mash run?
Sorry, I'm not sure what you're asking :)  But yes, I've done some one gallon batches.

You can get a hose adapter and run the hose out a window to wherever you are brewing...

Only if you want a skating rink, Tom.
From the output of the chiller?  I'd have to find a place to dump it or you could run a hose from the output to the sewer.  Depends on where you live.  Maybe there would be no place, in which case it's a bad idea. :)
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: hopfenundmalz on November 07, 2011, 09:24:12 PM
The problem with a snow bank is that snow has a lot of air depending on the type of snow (good insulation for igloos), and once it melts away from the kettle, you just have ambient air to transfer the heat to.  If it is around freezing, this can take a while, as I remember from back in the early 90's when I tried that.

The pond pump recirculating the snow water mixture is much faster.  One does have to shovel a fair amount of snow into the water to get down to lager temps.  Here in Michigan we often have more than enough snow for the task.  
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: punatic on November 07, 2011, 09:25:14 PM
It's a harsh place to live, but I wouldn't choose to live anywhere else.

Hawaii's just so damn expensive!
 :D

Heh, heh, heh.  We like for people to believe that.

People like what they know.  I mean, people LOVE New Jersey.  What's up with that?!    ???

(full disclosure, my wife is a Jersey Tomata)
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: morticaixavier on November 07, 2011, 09:26:33 PM
You can get a hose adapter and run the hose out a window to wherever you are brewing...

Only if you want a skating rink, Tom.

[

oh come on! who doesn't want a skating rink right outside the brewery? brew a little, drink a little skate a little right? it's even better if it's your driveway! then you can skate in your car! you didn't really need that garage door right? waiting for it to open, waiting for it close what a bummer! ;D
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: Kit B on November 07, 2011, 09:58:27 PM
oh come on! who doesn't want a skating rink right outside the brewery? brew a little, drink a little skate a little right? it's even better if it's your driveway! then you can skate in your car! you didn't really need that garage door right? waiting for it to open, waiting for it close what a bummer! ;D

My driveway is on a slight incline & one winter morning, I woke up to find that my Pathfinder had slid down my icy driveway & stopped with the rear bumper hanging just beyond the curb.
I now salt my driveway, whenever I expect things to ice up.


Heh, heh, heh.  We like for people to believe that.

People like what they know.  I mean, people LOVE New Jersey.  What's up with that?!    ???

(full disclosure, my wife is a Jersey Tomata)

I wasn't aware that anyone liked NJ.

I like Minnesota's lakes & wilderness.
Maine, New York, Wisconsin & Michigan might be adequate replacements.
But, Midwest Supplies is based, here.

The problem with a snow bank is that snow has a lot of air depending on the type of snow (good insulation for igloos), and once it melts away from the kettle, you just have ambient air to transfer the heat to.  If it is around freezing, this can take a while, as I remember from back in the early 90's when I tried that.

The pond pump recirculating the snow water mixture is much faster.  One does have to shovel a fair amount of snow into the water to get down to lager temps.  Here in Michigan we often have more than enough snow for the task.  

When I used to chill with snow, I made sure it was tightly packed against the sides of my kettle, several times throughout the cooling process...But, you're right...Takes for-freakin'-ever!
...Better to make a slush bath in the kitchen sink or laundry tub.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: ckpash88 on November 08, 2011, 12:34:08 AM

Quote
I built a 1-gallon setup for doing some little batches, it was cheap and easy.  I use a 2 gallon round cooler as a mash tun.  I think for an average gravity beer, mash tun volume can equal batch size and you'll be fine.  A 2 gallon cooler will probably be fine for a 2.5 gallon batch too.

Was the batch size you were making 1 gallon batches and your mash tun was a 2 gallon round cooler

Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 08, 2011, 12:47:49 AM

Quote
I built a 1-gallon setup for doing some little batches, it was cheap and easy.  I use a 2 gallon round cooler as a mash tun.  I think for an average gravity beer, mash tun volume can equal batch size and you'll be fine.  A 2 gallon cooler will probably be fine for a 2.5 gallon batch too.

Was the batch size you were making 1 gallon batches and your mash tun was a 2 gallon round cooler


Sorry, it was this that I didn't understand "Our had a one gallon mash run?" ;D

Yes, I use a two gallon cooler for making 1 gallon batches, mostly because the 2 gallon cooler was cheap and was the smallest cooler I could find with a spigot already in the bottom.  It looks like this, except it's blue :)  It works well enough for me for test batches.  I think it will give you enough capacity for moderate gravity 2.5 gallon batches, it will easily fit 5 lbs of grain. 

http://www.target.com/p/Igloo-Legend-cooler-Red-2-Gallon/-/A-11905596#
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: ckpash88 on November 08, 2011, 05:04:39 AM
Yeah I post from my iPhone so autocorrect changed tun to run. Little confusion there.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: tschmidlin on November 08, 2011, 05:19:08 AM
I assume you're familiar with http://damnyouautocorrect.com/ ? ;D
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: kgs on November 08, 2011, 05:34:52 AM
If you wanted to brew 2.5 gallon batches to save space so you can do it inside how big would you want your mash tun to be for a average gravity beer?

Bc i have thought of doing this so i can have a faster turn over and experiment more and be able to do it in the winter. I live in MN and even in my garage its 40 degrees during the winter gets a little cold

I have a 2-gallon cooler, but I also have a 5-gallon cooler which I use more often. The spigots are interchangeable (which means I can move my strainer from one to the other very easily).
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: malzig on November 08, 2011, 05:20:26 PM
For an average gravity beer, a tun the same volume as the batch works best.  You can sqeeze a 2.5 gallon batch out of a 2 gallon cooler, but you'll be happier with a 3-5 gallon cooler.
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: davidgzach on November 08, 2011, 08:36:15 PM
I assume you're familiar with http://damnyouautocorrect.com/ ? ;D
That's funny!
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: davidgzach on November 08, 2011, 08:45:27 PM
I too am in a bit of a dilemma about how to use my wort chiller this winter.  I'm in PA, so not as bad as WI, but it does get below freezing and we had some 28' of snow last year.  I really do not have a good way to let the output of the chiller go without turning my driveway in to an ice rink.  It's about 110' long and on a steep angle so not to mess with.

I will probably go back to what I did pre-wort chiller.  Put the kettle in the laundry room sink, add ice and water, and start to stir when it gets below 90F to avoid hot-side aeration.  Takes 45-60 minutes as opposed to 20, but gets the job done.

Dave
Title: Re: All grain brewing in the winter
Post by: malzig on November 08, 2011, 10:38:54 PM
I too am in a bit of a dilemma about how to use my wort chiller this winter.
They make a simple adapter that allows you to connect a hose fitting to your sink faucet.  That's what I use to run my chiller in the winter.