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General Category => Beer Recipes => Topic started by: denny on January 16, 2010, 05:39:38 pm

Title: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 16, 2010, 05:39:38 pm
I'm planning on brewing a dunkel next week.  It's one of my favorite styles and I've been looking for the perfect recipe for years.  I've tried my own and a few other people's but I have yet to make one that's crisp without malty being sweet.  Since I only brew lagers when the weather is cold enough to ferment outdoors, I only get one or 2 chances a year to work on it.  If you've got a dunkel recipe you love, I'd like to see it!  I have Wyeast Hellabock and Staro Prague slurries available.  I've got a smack pack of 2206, too, but I won't have time to get a starter of that built by next week.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Beertracker on January 17, 2010, 06:06:09 am
This recipe is a bit dated using the DWC maltings & was inspired by the Czechs vs. Germans, but it's still one of the best homebrewed Dunkles I've ever had. ;)

Doubravka Dunkel
http://alemakers.com/e107_plugins/content/content.php?content.37 (http://alemakers.com/e107_plugins/content/content.php?content.37)

Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 17, 2010, 06:56:59 am
I don't think the recipe matters much. Dunkels tend to be large amounts of Munich, sometimes a significant amount of Pils and possibly a small amount of specialty malts for additional character and color.

The chrispness is not so much a result of the recipe as it is a result of fermentation. You want the yeast to consume as much fermentable sugars as possible. I.e you want to get to the terminal gravity of the beer and for that you'll have to do a fast ferment test. Based on my own experience I would not assume that this happens automatically if you pitch the right amount of healthy yeast. Melanoidens affect the yeast and slow down fermentation. I actually have yet to brew a Dunkel where the attenuation to attenuation limit is less than 3%.

Some pils in the grist also helps in getting a more fermentable wort. Dark Munich can be tricky and lead to rather unfermentable worts unless you make sure you account for its low enzymatic power in the mash.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on January 17, 2010, 02:40:52 pm
this earned me a gold and an MCAB slot last Sept:

I think the key to having it crisp, malty yet not sweet is the inclusion of pils malt in the grist - the addition of pils malt helped me get there.

Quote
BeerSmith Recipe Printout - http://www.beersmith.com
Recipe: Blatz Munich Dunkel
Brewer: Paul Blatz
Asst Brewer:
Style: Munich Dunkel
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (35.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Batch Size: 12.00 gal      
Boil Size: 14.20 gal
Estimated OG: 1.053 SG
Estimated Color: 19.3 SRM
Estimated IBU: 20.5 IBU
Brewhouse Efficiency: 75.00 %
Boil Time: 90 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amount       Item                                         Type        % or IBU    
12.00 lb     Munich Malt - 10L (8.3 SRM)                  Grain       50.00 %      
6.00 lb      Pilsner (2 Row) Ger (1.8 SRM)                Grain       25.00 %      
4.00 lb      Munich Malt - 20L (16.0 SRM)                 Grain       16.67 %      
1.00 lb      Carafoam (2.0 SRM)                           Grain       4.17 %      
0.75 lb      Carafa II (412.0 SRM)                        Grain       3.13 %      
0.25 lb      Melanoiden Malt (20.0 SRM)                   Grain       1.04 %      
2.50 oz      Tettnang [4.90 %]  (60 min)                  Hops        16.5 IBU    
1.00 oz      Tettnang [4.90 %]  (20 min)                  Hops        4.0 IBU                      
1 Pkgs       German Lager (White Labs #WLP830)            Yeast-Lager              


Mash Schedule: Single Infusion, Medium Body
Total Grain Weight: 24.00 lb
----------------------------
Single Infusion, Medium Body
Step Time     Name               Description                         Step Temp    
60 min        Mash In            Add 43.00 qt of water at 160.1 F    152.0 F      
   

Hope that helps.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: babalu87 on January 17, 2010, 03:25:35 pm
I used all Munich with a dash of Carafa II in my last one
Used a 20 minute 133 protein rest and then mashed at 153 for 45 minutes

OG was 1.057 (a little high) FG wound up at 1.015 going into lagering but I fully expect that to drop at least one more point by the time its ready for serving.

It tasted GREAT going into the lagering fridge
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 17, 2010, 04:46:53 pm
Thanks for the recipes and advice.  Each year when I make this, I go back and forth between adding crystal/cara type malts for more of a Czech dunkel and leaving them out for a more German version.  I've got a bag od Best Munich calling me, so since Ayinger dunkel is my Holy Grail I think I'll be going in a more German direction this year.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Beertracker on January 19, 2010, 06:35:45 pm
...Ayinger dunkel is my Holy Grail I think I'll be going in a more German direction this year.

Mine is Augustiner, but I'm going to wait until I can get some of their famous house yeast before I make another attempt.  ;)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: majorvices on January 20, 2010, 01:29:31 pm
Denny - Andy (Wingstall) over at the B3 forum gave me this recipe after he sampled one of my Dunkles. He said that he felt mine was a little "over the top" and I assumed he meant it was too sweet and not crisp enough, as you are mentioning, and since he had just got back from Germany the style was still fresh on his mind. In the beer I sent him the recipe used all Munich (a blend of type I and type II leaning heavily on the type II) with some CaraMunich, maybe a little Carafa, no pils. I admit - I thought it was pretty good (or I wouldn't have sent it  ;) ) but I can see where it needed lightened up. I think the pils is important to the crispness, as was mentioned elsewhere in this thread. I also thought it was interesting that the Bavarian Brewmaster mentioned ading the pils malt "for the enzymes", as you will see below.

Here's the malt bill he said he copied straight from a Bavarian brewmaster while attending brewing school in Germany a couple years ago. I have not brewed it yet but I have a helles going right now that I was planning on using the yeast for this recipe next. One thing I am going to probably change is a little less CaraMunich (probably around 5%) when I make it, but I think CaraMunich is essential to this style.

70% Munich Malt (Cat. I, 17 EBC)
19% Pale/Pilsner Malt (for enzymes)
10% CaraMunich
1% Roasted Malt (0.5%-1.5%)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 20, 2010, 02:55:50 pm
When I was at a German brewpub last year I was taking a closer look at their brew system and saw that the brewmaster left the brew log lying around. So I took a picture of it. It was for a Dunkel and the grist contained Munich, Pils and a Carafa type malt. I’ll have to check tonight which proportions exactly. But the beer wasn’t that great and I contribute that to the lack of clarity and suboptimal fermentation/aging.

Many here reported that Pils is important for crispness. I wonder if that is the result of better fermentability through increased enzymatic strength or just the result of less munich malt.

Kai

Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 20, 2010, 05:19:07 pm
Thanks a bunch, guys.  I think I'm going with about 70% Best Munich (about 10L), 25% pils, 2% CaraMunich, and 1% carafa.  We'll see how this year's batch turns out!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 20, 2010, 05:37:42 pm
70% Best Munich (about 10L),

Is this the dark or the light kind?

My experience with the dark kind has been that it produces rather unfermentable worts when used on it's own. But you are using 25% Pils with it which should fix the problem.

I found a similar problem with Fraco Belges light Munich which caused my recent batches of Alt to be less fermentable than planned. Even after I took corrective action on the 2nd batch. I never experienced these problems with Weyermann Munich malts which is why I plan to to back to that source.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 20, 2010, 05:44:20 pm
Is this the dark or the light kind?

They call it dark and list it as 9-12 SRM.  The light they list as 6-8 SRM.  I have a bag of Durst Munich also, but I've never used the Best so I thought I'd give it a try.  I really considered just going with the dunkel grist you list on your site, Kai, but I finally decided to change it up a but.  OTOH, I haven't ground the grain yet, so we'll see what I finally do!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 20, 2010, 07:04:27 pm
They call it dark and list it as 9-12 SRM.  The light they list as 6-8 SRM.  I have a bag of Durst Munich also, but I've never used the Best so I thought I'd give it a try.  I really considered just going with the dunkel grist you list on your site, Kai, but I finally decided to change it up a but.  OTOH, I haven't ground the grain yet, so we'll see what I finally do!

I do plan to brew 2 batches of Dunkel soon. So far I’m not committed to what I want to change between them. My initial thought was fermentation temperature but that could also be evaluated with another batch. Brewing one with and the other w/o Pilsner malt seems interesting since this is a pretty substantial difference that brewers tend to debate. Traditionalists will say that a Dunkel should not be brewed with Pils while others will argue that using Pils makes a better Dunkel.

My favorite is Paulaner’s Dunkel. I was told hat it is only brewed with dark malt (i.e. no Pils). Judging by its color Paulaner must use more than just dark Munich for it. Maybe some carafa or even some dark crystal. It doesn’t have any prominent crystal character though. Neither does it show roast character, yet it appeared darker then the Dunkel I make with 99% dark Munich and 1% Carafa.

Based on the brewery’s description, Ayinger’s Dunkel seems to be a bit more complex. It uses 5 different malts which I find unusual for German brewing. They are definitely mixing up some base malts and adding some specialty malts. It is also characterized as an Export which means it’s brewed a bit stronger and better attenuated than a typical Dunkel. A starting gravity of 12.8 Plato and 5.0% v/v alcohol however indicate a final gravity of about 3 Plato which is more than the typical German beer FG of 2-2.5 Plato. If this beer seems dry it must be the result of fairly complete fermentation.

BTW, don’t get confused by the “double fermentation process” that is mentioned on Ayinger’s site. The German version refers to double decoction, which makes more sense to me.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on January 20, 2010, 07:07:47 pm
Based on the brewery’s description, Ayinger’s Dunkel seems to be a bit more complex. It uses 5 different malts which I find unusual for German brewing. They are definitely mixing up some base malts and adding some specialty malts. It is also characterized as an Export which means it’s brewed a bit stronger and better attenuated than a typical Dunkel. A starting gravity of 12.8 Plato and 5.0% v/v alcohol however indicate a final gravity of about 3 Plato which is more than the typical German beer FG of 2-2.5 Plato. If this beer seems dry it must be the result of fairly complete fermentation.


interesting - thanks for that info kai - I swear I learn something new just about every time I read one of your posts.

very helpful

Cheers!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 20, 2010, 07:14:33 pm
No kidding.....as I said, Ayinger is my personal "Holy Grail".  Guess I'd better look at the website!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 20, 2010, 07:23:56 pm
I just checked the results with this calculator

http://leebrewery.com/beermath.htm

12.8% starting extract is 1.0518 sg
to get 5.0% abv I need an FG of 3.47% or 1.0136 sg

This is an attenuation of only 73% which is surprisingly low for an Export.

Paulaner Dunkel has a starting gravity of 12.4% and an ABV of 5.3%

The attenuation is 80% and the final extract is 2.5% (1.010).

This is quite surprising since Denny considers Ayinger Dunkel drier. I haven’t had the Ayiner Dunkel in a long time. Looks like I have to get a bottle and see for myself.

Kai

Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 20, 2010, 07:26:08 pm
I can't recall if I've ever had a Paulaner dunkel....guess it's time for a trip to the local good beer store!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: bluesman on January 20, 2010, 07:41:05 pm
No kidding.....as I said, Ayinger is my personal "Holy Grail".  Guess I'd better look at the website!

+1

I just had a bottle of their Celebrator Dopplebock... the one with the little charm hanging from the neck.. An outstanding beer.

I would like to brew a Dunkel someday. Here's what Michael Jasckson had to say about Ayinger's Altbairish Dark.

"Beer International, the Ayinger Dunkel Altbairisch aptly as follows:" A good example of its kind, almost impenetrable dark brown with gold shimmer, if it holds up against the light, and with warm aroma, malty flavor and reminiscent of coffee aftertaste. Gebraut wird es aus fünferlei Malzen – zwei davon dunkel gedarrt - und es wird nur leicht gehopft.“ Hergestellt wird es im traditionellen Zwei-Maisch-Verfahren. It is brewed from five kinds of malts - two of them gedarrt dark - and it is only lightly hopped. "It is produced in the traditional two-mash process.

I'm going to see if I can pick up a bottle of this beer.

Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 21, 2010, 04:20:11 am
I just brew Kai's Dunkel recipe.
It is in fermenter now.
I used Globe Dark Munich 12L.
By the way Wayermann does not have 15L Munich malt any more.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 21, 2010, 06:27:32 am
By the way Wayermann does not have 15L Munich malt any more.

Where did you see that. Their website still lists Munich type I and II. Type II is the dark one.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: NorthernIke on January 21, 2010, 02:09:36 pm
I just brewed a dunkel that is in the fermentor now.  My grist was:

93% Best Munich I
5% CaraAroma
2% Pale Chocolate (for some color)

Gravity into the fermentor of 1.051.  I brewed this with the hockhurz (sp?) double decoction.  My hope was that the long maltose rest (145°F) would help maximize the enzymatic activity and produce a more fermentable wort.

I will let you all know how it turns out once I keg it up in a few weeks.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: babalu87 on January 21, 2010, 07:05:19 pm
Mine was all Best Munich with enough Carafa II to get the color right.
Should be ready in about a month, by then it will have lagered 6+ weeks

Kai, are you doing the Oktoberfest/Marzen brew again?
Remind me to grab some of those cardboard cones before the February meeting

Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Thirsty_Monk on January 21, 2010, 08:06:47 pm
By the way Wayermann does not have 15L Munich malt any more.

Where did you see that. Their website still lists Munich type I and II. Type II is the dark one.

Kai
Yes they do have Dark Munich but it is 8.1 - 9.9L
http://www.weyermannmalt.com/eng/produkte.asp?PN=2&idkat=15&umenue=yes&idmenue=37&sprache=2

Dark Munich use to be 15L.
Not sure why they do not have it anymore.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 21, 2010, 08:31:40 pm
Yes they do have Dark Munich but it is 8.1 - 9.9L
http://www.weyermannmalt.com/eng/produkte.asp?PN=2&idkat=15&umenue=yes&idmenue=37&sprache=2

Dark Munich used to be 15L.
Not sure why they do not have it anymore.

I don’t know. 15L is about 40 EBC which seems to be the upper end of color for Munich malt. I tried to find the color for BestMalz dark Munich but wasn’t able to. Maybe the lower color of the Weyermann dark Munich malt is the reason why it is ezymatically so much stronger than BestMalz dark Munich.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 21, 2010, 09:47:58 pm
According to North Country Malt (http://www.northcountrymalt.com/pages.php?pageid=28), Best dark Munich is 9-12L.  I just got done milling some and it looked darker than either Durst or Weyermann.

BTW, I changed things a bit when it came to milling....I used 9 lb. Best Munich II, 2 lb. Best pils, .5 lb. Weyermann CaraMunich, and 2 oz. carafa.  Gonna dig through the hop freezer this afternoon and decide on what hops to use.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on January 21, 2010, 09:54:06 pm
Gonna dig through the hop freezer this afternoon and decide on what hops to use.

no columbus!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 21, 2010, 10:05:07 pm
Gonna dig through the hop freezer this afternoon and decide on what hops to use.

no columbus!

Killjoy!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on January 21, 2010, 11:27:13 pm
Some more food for thought.

If we look closely at receipes for Dunkel and Schwarzbier a distinct similarity will be apparent:

- both tend to use Pils, Munich, dark crystal and roast malt
- both are malt dominated

The difference, as I see it, is that the Dunkel takes most of its character from the Munich malt while the Schwarzbier is more dominated by the crystal and/or roasted malt. The latter may also have a thinner mounthfeel though the Dunkels I had were far from having a thick and creamy mouthfeel.

I find this distinction important as I do want to develop a Schwarzbier and a Dunkel recipe that are distinctly different beers even if the types of malt used in the grist are strikingly similar.

Another good analogy is the difference between Helles and Pilsner. Same grist and similar hops. The Helles focuses on the malt but can still have a hint of hop aroma and taste while the Pils focuses on the hops. The range of bitterness found in Germany for both styles actually overlaps quite a bit. There are Helles beers that more bitter  than some Pilsner beers.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 22, 2010, 04:40:43 pm
I readily admit that m favorite alt recipes aren't necessarily true to style, but they closely resemble the grist bill for dunkels that I've seen.   It's interesting how recipes that are so close, like the schwarz/dunkel or pils/helles you mention, can be so different with minor changes.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on January 22, 2010, 04:45:58 pm

I find this distinction important as I do want to develop a Schwarzbier and a Dunkel recipe that are distinctly different beers even if the types of malt used in the grist are strikingly similar.


funny - I noticed the same thing and in my efforts to make my schwarz distinct, I wound up increasing the dark roast malts to the point that I ended up with what my buddy calls Schwarter (I just call it Black Dog Lager  ;) ), but I like it so much, I no longer care that its out of style. 
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: bluesman on January 22, 2010, 05:37:37 pm
The biggest differences that I can see as far as style guidelines go is that the Schwarzbier balances roasted yet smooth malt flavors with moderate hop bitterness.

Whereas the Munich Dunkel expresses the depth of the Munich malt and melanoidins, but not as intense as a Bock or as roasted as a Schwarty.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: beer_crafter on January 25, 2010, 02:03:53 am
I use a lighter Munich (Weyermann Munich I) without any Pils.
91.25% Munich I
5% Caramunich
3.75% Carafa Special II
I tend to use "american noble" type hops-- Liberty, Mt Hood,  or Vanguard.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: hampshirebrewer on January 25, 2010, 08:20:00 pm
So many dunkel recipes, so little time.

I used 9 lb Weyermann Munich (the lighter one), 1 lb Weyermann Pils and 1/4 lb Carafa II.

I decocted 1 gallon of the mash after dough in at 95F with a 30-minute boil after a 15 minute rest at 155F.

I stove top mash and fly sparge.

There's got to be a way to use a decoction to add in to a batch sparge. Complicated but possibly worth it. Watching the decoction darken was entertaining.

Hopefully I'll have a dunkel that can compete with the Schwarzbiers this spring...
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 25, 2010, 09:17:19 pm
There's got to be a way to use a decoction to add in to a batch sparge. Complicated but possibly worth it. Watching the decoction darken was entertaining.

Sure there is....batch sparging has nothing to do with how you conduct your mash.  I've done decoctions more than a few times, but seldom do these days as I have real questions about what they supposedly add to a beer.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: dean on January 26, 2010, 05:15:52 pm
Wow, I love dunkel and I've wanted to try making one for over a year now so this thread is great!  Its too cold here to ferment in the brew shed yet and I don't have enough room in the house or a place I can keep the temperature around 45* (without my wife complaining  :D ) so I'll have to wait a month or so probably to make a lager.  Which yeast is best yeast for it?  I like Warsteiner it has a very smooth mouthfeel to it.   
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 26, 2010, 05:48:08 pm
I really like WY2206 for dunkel.  Very clean, leaves a nice mouthfeel, and easy to work with in terms of seldom needing a d rest.  I used the Wyeast Staro Prague (2782?) on my most recent batch because that's what I could get on the schedule I needed it.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: bluesman on January 26, 2010, 05:49:32 pm
Denny...did you brew the Dunkel yet?
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 26, 2010, 06:10:57 pm
Yep, last Sun.  It went smoothly.  I was aiming for 5.5 gal. of 1.054 and got 6 gal. of 1.057.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: majorvices on January 26, 2010, 06:29:24 pm
There's got to be a way to use a decoction to add in to a batch sparge. Complicated but possibly worth it. Watching the decoction darken was entertaining.

Sure there is....batch sparging has nothing to do with how you conduct your mash.  I've done decoctions more than a few times, but seldom do these days as I have real questions about what they supposedly add to a beer.

+1. I used to do decoctions all the time with batch sparging. There's no real difference between pulling decoctions with fly sparging and/or batch sparging. What makes you think there is?
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: bluesman on January 26, 2010, 06:29:51 pm
Yep, last Sun.  It went smoothly.  I was aiming for 5.5 gal. of 1.054 and got 6 gal. of 1.057.

Nice.

What grain bill did you end up using?
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on January 26, 2010, 06:39:32 pm
9 lb. Best Munich II
2 lb. Best pils
.5 lb. CaraMunich 40
2 oz. carafa

sure looked and smelled good when I took the OG!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: babalu87 on January 27, 2010, 02:21:33 pm
Wow, I love dunkel and I've wanted to try making one for over a year now so this thread is great!  Its too cold here to ferment in the brew shed yet and I don't have enough room in the house or a place I can keep the temperature around 45* (without my wife complaining  :D ) so I'll have to wait a month or so probably to make a lager.  Which yeast is best yeast for it?  I like Warsteiner it has a very smooth mouthfeel to it.   

Try an aquarium heater.
I use one in a swamp "cooler" in my basement with Winters icy grip upon us.

Was using an old one from a fish tank we had but it crapped out. Wal-Mart had a nice short one that works perfect.
Make sure to get one large enough. They size them according to how many gallons they can heat. Mine is a 15-30 gallon heater, works great.

You'll want a temperature controller because almost all the new aquarium heaters I saw have a built in thermostat to keep the water at 76-78 degrees.

Its also nice to have one for Belgian styles so you can ramp temps up as fermentation moves along.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: beer_crafter on February 16, 2010, 03:16:16 pm
I use a lighter Munich (Weyermann Munich I) without any Pils.
91.25% Munich I
5% Caramunich
3.75% Carafa Special II
I tend to use "american noble" type hops-- Liberty, Mt Hood,  or Vanguard.

FYI after brewing this again, I think 3+% is too much Carafa Special.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Kaiser on February 16, 2010, 03:18:11 pm
FYI after brewing this again, I think 3+% is too much Carafa Special.

You may have a good Schwarzbier on your hand if the Munich is not coming through too strong.

Kai
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on February 16, 2010, 04:54:26 pm
Mine just passed 3 weeks in primary and I'm  about to give it a "whether it needs it or not" d rest.  I'll xfer it by this weekend, so then I'll have an idea how it tastes.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on February 18, 2010, 06:54:05 pm
Update....I moved the dunkel into the house for a d rest yesterday (even though I didn't taste any diacetyl) and filled a PET bottle, carbed and chilled it for a sample.  Even at this early stage, I was blown away by how well this one turned out.  Thanks everybody for your tips and thoughts.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: jwatkins56550 on March 18, 2010, 03:29:36 am
I love dunkel's...and am really thinking of making another one soon.  Everytime, I've just used munich malt.  This time, I think I'll add a little pilsner in there to help it finish a little lower..hope your beer turns out good!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 18, 2010, 03:37:39 pm
hope your beer turns out good!

It turned out to be the best dunkel I've ever made!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on March 18, 2010, 03:52:23 pm
It turned out to be the best dunkel I've ever made!

well you did use Best.   :D
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Beertracker on March 18, 2010, 03:53:20 pm
That's great!  I'm planning on kegging mine this weekend. I wasn't to certain about using the Urquell strain for a dark, but my initial assessment is +thumbs up.  8)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 18, 2010, 04:12:23 pm
It turned out to be the best dunkel I've ever made!

well you did use Best.   :D

Yeah, I'm seriously impressed by the malt flavor.  I can't recall the yeast off the top of my head, but it was one of the Wyeast VSS a couple months back...pretty sure it wasn't the HellaBock.  I'm gonna have to check my notes, cause it's a great yeast!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on March 18, 2010, 05:59:40 pm
we told you Best was the shiz-nit!

I won a sack of cargill german pils last spring, made a german pils with it and all my beer friends asked me "What happened to the malt flavor on this batch?"  nothing different, just inferior raw material!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: bluesman on March 18, 2010, 06:54:31 pm
Alright...That does it...I am going to get some Best and give this beer a try. It's a done deal. It's officially on the list!

Has anyone tried a German Pils with Best. Don't all answer at once now. Anyway how does it compare to Weyermann?
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on March 18, 2010, 07:02:40 pm
Has anyone tried a German Pils with Best. Don't all answer at once now. Anyway how does it compare to Weyermann?

I think you know my answer - i make about 2-3 pils batches a year, and 2-3 dorts.   I used to be a Weyermann man, but Best takes the gold by many strides.  

oh yeah -- you wanted to know how it compares?  a little more malt candy sweetness (you have to taste it to know what I mean), and the pils malt aroma just seems to be bigger - like it jumps out of the glass and smacks you in the face.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 18, 2010, 07:19:54 pm
I couldn't say that Best is "sweeter" than Weyermann, but my perception is that it has more flavor.  Like Paul, I was pretty much a Weyermann guy until I tried Best.

BTW, this was the yeast I used...

Wyeast 2782-PC Staro Prague Lager Yeast

Beer Styles: Bohemian Pilsner, Munich Helles, Vienna Lager, Oktoberfest/Marzen, Munich Dunkel, Schwarzbier, Traditional Bock, Maibock/Hellesbock, Dopplebock, Eisbock
Profile: This yeast will help create medium to full body lagers with moderate fruit and bready malt flavors. The balance is slightly toward malt sweetness and will benefit from additional hop bittering. A fantastic strain for producing classic Bohemian lagers.
Alc. Tolerance 11% ABV  
Flocculation     medium
Attenuation       70-74%              
Temp. Range   50-58°F (10-14°C)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on March 18, 2010, 07:41:05 pm
let me clarify that a bit - its not 'sweeter' its got what ryan described, and I think fits well, more of a malt candy like flavor.    I guess its just more malt flavor, if you wanted to be simpler. 

its one of those flavors that is hard to accurately describe, but you'll know it when you taste it.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Beertracker on March 19, 2010, 12:41:03 am
You guys are killing me with this Best Malz being the "Shiz-nit" stuff, as I'm sitting on 110# of Best Pils but I promised myself I wouldn't open the bags until I finish my last sack of Weyermann. It looks like an Imperial Pils is coming up soon!  :D
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 19, 2010, 12:48:10 am
Dude, I had open bags of both Durst and Weyermann, but I dove into the Best as soon as I got it!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Beertracker on March 19, 2010, 04:23:51 pm
Dude, I had open bags of both Durst and Weyermann, but I dove into the Best as soon as I got it!

I wish I had your care free, counterculture mentality!   8)
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: blatz on March 19, 2010, 05:29:47 pm
Dude, I had open bags of both Durst and Weyermann, but I dove into the Best as soon as I got it!

I wish I had your care free, counterculture mentality!   8)

Beertracker - perhaps you could blend the two?
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: Hydro on March 14, 2011, 02:19:36 am
What is the url for locating Best grains?  Did some google searching, unable to locate.  I am planning on making a Munich Dunkle and am interested in this recipe.  Is this for a 5.5 gal or 6 gal batch?  What hops and schedule did you use?
Thanks

9 lb. Best Munich II
2 lb. Best pils
.5 lb. CaraMunich 40
2 oz. carafa

sure looked and smelled good when I took the OG!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 14, 2011, 03:48:03 pm
It was a 5.5 gal. batch.  I'll have to look at my notes to see what hops I used.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: jaybeerman on March 14, 2011, 04:28:50 pm
What is the url for locating Best grains?  Did some google searching, unable to locate.  I am planning on making a Munich Dunkle and am interested in this recipe.  Is this for a 5.5 gal or 6 gal batch?  What hops and schedule did you use?
Thanks

Try "Best Malting," my usual link to their site didn't work today.  Try this http://www.countrymaltgroup.com/bestmaltz.asp (http://www.countrymaltgroup.com/bestmaltz.asp) for grain descriptions
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: 4swan on March 15, 2011, 12:52:22 pm
The maltsters url is http://www.bestmalz.de/en/
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: dmtaylor on November 28, 2014, 04:57:34 pm
This thread deserves resurrection because it's so friggin awesome.  ;D

I've never made a dunkel yet, but when I do... I don't know what I'll do.  Looks like Best Malz is a no brainer.  Other than that... I bet you really can't go wrong as long as you use a ton of Munich and a good German lager yeast with good lagering time.  One of these days, I shall brew one up...
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on November 28, 2014, 05:10:35 pm
This thread deserves resurrection because it's so friggin awesome.  ;D

I've never made a dunkel yet, but when I do... I don't know what I'll do.  Looks like Best Malz is a no brainer.  Other than that... I bet you really can't go wrong as long as you use a ton of Munich and a good German lager yeast with good lagering time.  One of these days, I shall brew one up...

Mine is just finishing up fermentation.  12 lb. Best Munich II, 6 oz. carafa special, WY2206
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: colinhayes on December 03, 2014, 03:29:46 am
This is making me wonder if the Best Malz is why my german style beers always win medals.

Looks like I'm not going to change using it, and may use it in non-german styles
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: erockrph on December 03, 2014, 03:10:03 pm
This thread deserves resurrection because it's so friggin awesome.  ;D

I've never made a dunkel yet, but when I do... I don't know what I'll do.  Looks like Best Malz is a no brainer.  Other than that... I bet you really can't go wrong as long as you use a ton of Munich and a good German lager yeast with good lagering time.  One of these days, I shall brew one up...

Mine is just finishing up fermentation.  12 lb. Best Munich II, 6 oz. carafa special, WY2206
Denny, do you have any issues with conversion using 100% Munich II as your base malt? Did you mash any longer than usual? I always chicken out and use maybe 15-20% Pils in my Dunkel for enzyme insurance.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on December 03, 2014, 05:14:29 pm
Denny, do you have any issues with conversion using 100% Munich II as your base malt? Did you mash any longer than usual? I always chicken out and use maybe 15-20% Pils in my Dunkel for enzyme insurance.

No problems at all.  I'd have to check my notes, but I'm pretty sure I mashed at 154 for 60 min.  Got 100% conversion efficiency, so no problems.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: HoosierBrew on December 03, 2014, 06:08:01 pm

No problems at all.  I'd have to check my notes, but I'm pretty sure I mashed at 154 for 60 min.  Got 100% conversion efficiency, so no problems.

Great info. I'd always used a little pils too, out of fear of not doing it.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: dmtaylor on December 03, 2014, 07:15:38 pm
I recently read somewhere (maybe even earlier in this very thread!?) that many maltsters don't make Munich malt too dark anymore these days.  I imagine the reason is to conserve enzymes for cases like these, but now that's just a wild a-- guess.  That's my theory and I'm sticking to it... for now.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: HoosierBrew on December 03, 2014, 07:20:14 pm
I recently read somewhere (maybe even earlier in this very thread!?) that many maltsters don't make Munich malt too dark anymore these days.  I imagine the reason is to conserve enzymes for cases like these, but now that's just a wild a-- guess.  That's my theory and I'm sticking to it... for now.

Makes sense.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on December 03, 2014, 08:02:30 pm
I recently read somewhere (maybe even earlier in this very thread!?) that many maltsters don't make Munich malt too dark anymore these days.  I imagine the reason is to conserve enzymes for cases like these, but now that's just a wild a-- guess.  That's my theory and I'm sticking to it... for now.

FWIW, I use 10L Best for continental beers and 10L Great Western for domestic.  No problems with either.
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: mmmbeeer on March 06, 2015, 07:26:38 pm
Denny,
I see you changed your malt bill on your most recent go around on a dunkel. Dropped the pils and caramunich. Which one did you prefer?  Which was a more authentic dunkel, if you recall?  Thx!
Title: Re: Let's see some dunkel recipes
Post by: denny on March 06, 2015, 07:43:30 pm
Denny,
I see you changed your malt bill on your most recent go around on a dunkel. Dropped the pils and caramunich. Which one did you prefer?  Which was a more authentic dunkel, if you recall?  Thx!

I think the one with pils and caramunich was more to my liking.  I've tried the recipe from BCS twice now, thinking that I screwed something up the first time.  But both came out the same and I found them too sweet and roasty.