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Messages - bayareabrewer

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New info on sanitizers
« on: July 17, 2018, 08:25:40 PM »
This study is not any good. It tested the efficacy of sanitizers using a 1:10 concentration of sanitizer and contaminant. Of course they wont be effective at that rate. We don't use iodophor for that purpose. It isn't meant to be used that way. We use it as a surface sanitizer on clean surfaces, and for that purpose it is very effective.
So, as long as I don't sanitize with 1 part rinse-free iodophor and 10 parts pedio... I should be fine?

haha yup. Its like leaving half a gallon of pedio slurry in your corny keg then filling it with sanitizer and expecting it to work.


2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New info on sanitizers
« on: July 17, 2018, 06:21:22 PM »
MBAA podcast ep. 96

Some very interesting (and potentially scary) stuff.  Apparently iodophor, especially at no-rinse concentrations,  isn't really very effective.  Worth a listen.

So what's the takeaway?  And what about personal experience finding iodophor very effective?

the takeaway should be that if you clean your equipment and use iodophor at the proper concentration and contact time it will be effective.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New info on sanitizers
« on: July 17, 2018, 06:16:41 PM »
This study is not any good. It tested the efficacy of sanitizers using a 1:10 concentration of sanitizer and contaminant. Of course they wont be effective at that rate. We don't use iodophor for that purpose. It isn't meant to be used that way. We use it as a surface sanitizer on clean surfaces, and for that purpose it is very effective.

4
I know you are supposed to minimize any aeration or O2 from beer after fermentation, but I always get some out of the bottling bucket.   How much can the yeast scavenge when bottling?

Thanks in advance for your reply

Leftover yeast from fermentation won't be very effective as oxygen scavengers.

In order of reducing (O2 scavenging) power:

1.) Bottling with extract
2.) Partially bottling with extract with a sugar supplement
3.) Bottling with fresh yeast and sugar
4.) Bottling with remaining yeast from fermentation

As a General PSA: Bottling with extract requires you track fermentation progress with an iron fist and can be tough to catch right. You need some bottles rated for higher pressure for margin. It is as safe as the user makes it but can be tricky to catch right.

You'll see a side effect of increased scavenging power is increased sediment in the bottles. If you are concerned with oxygen pickup at bottling (I sure am as I am a bottler as well) then I would suggest pitching additional yeast with the priming sugar when you bottle. Also bottling as close to the completion of fermentation as possible helps to limit exposure of the finished beer to oxygen.

don't forget about the equipment needed to monitor drifts in yeast mutation that effect fermentation.

5
Classifieds / Re: Bay Area Events Ambassador for Drake's Brewing Co
« on: June 15, 2018, 04:37:31 PM »
with the cost of living in the Bay Area what it is, how do you possibly think you are going to find anyone in their 20's that will be a reliable employee for a minimum wage, no benefit position with poor hours? I don't mean to be negative, but the question has to be asked. You are a large and successful brewing company. You can do better than this.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Invincible Rumors
« on: April 09, 2018, 08:17:58 PM »
theres plenty of things homebrewers dont need to bother with that pros have to because of scale.
Absolutely true, but many processes we adopt in some fashion. Like hop stands/whirlpool.

I dont know many homebrewers stressing out about mash bed impaction because of the 2000 pounds of barley they just loaded in their tun or sheer stress on wort due to industrial pumps.

7
Ingredients / Re: Wild hops
« on: April 09, 2018, 07:48:02 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.

isnt  madarina bavaria just cascade grown in germany?

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Invincible Rumors
« on: April 09, 2018, 07:44:58 PM »
theres plenty of things homebrewers dont need to bother with that pros have to because of scale.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: India black lager water adjusments
« on: February 21, 2018, 06:17:17 PM »
bootleg biology has a lager yeast?

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 06:55:55 PM »
I was up in Sonoma recently and went to two different highly regarded breweries that make the neipa style.   

Which ones?  I'm heading up there in a few months and wouldn't mind giving them a taste.
Henhouse brewing, and I think the other was called spotted goat or something like that. Both seem to be well regarded breweries, I just really don't like the taste of that style. I appreciate the art of making them, just not the end result, I need crispness in my IPA. If you are near auburn Moonraker brewing pretty much exclusively makes that style of beer, Knee Deep brewing in Auburn has a huge tap list of many different styles as well. Where are you in the bay area, I can give you some good suggestions

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 05:40:00 PM »
I swear these "no IBU" fruit bomb "IPA's" are for people that would rather have a wine cooler but are too embarrassed to order one  :D  :D. But seriously, tons of residual sugar, huge body, no bitterness and fruitiness out the ying yang, that sounds like Bartles and James not an IPA.

Any specific examples you're talking about?  Obviously they exist but I think many other IPAs have improved vs 10 years ago due to better packaging/freshness, more late hops, and fewer residual sugars/crystal malts.

these neipa that use super fruity hop varieties, super fruity, low attenuating yeast and high chloride water. It makes for a fruity and insipid drink for my tastes. They taste like wine coolers.

Any specific examples? I've had some from Hill Farmstead, Trillium, etc. that are obviously crafted very well and taste great. Obviously you get turds as outliers but the well made versions are worth seeking out.

I was up in Sonoma recently and went to two different highly regarded breweries that make the neipa style. Both tasted fruity, sweet and insipid. I also went to an award winning brewery on my way to Tahoe that makes the style and same thing, fruity, sweet and insipid. I just don't like the style, its imbalanced, sweet, fruity and not very drinkable. 

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 05:26:46 PM »
I swear these "no IBU" fruit bomb "IPA's" are for people that would rather have a wine cooler but are too embarrassed to order one  :D  :D. But seriously, tons of residual sugar, huge body, no bitterness and fruitiness out the ying yang, that sounds like Bartles and James not an IPA.

Any specific examples you're talking about?  Obviously they exist but I think many other IPAs have improved vs 10 years ago due to better packaging/freshness, more late hops, and fewer residual sugars/crystal malts.

these neipa that use super fruity hop varieties, super fruity, low attenuating yeast and high chloride water. It makes for a fruity and insipid drink for my tastes. They taste like wine coolers.

13
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Oxidized DIPA -again...
« on: February 09, 2018, 04:38:07 PM »
Winemaking isn't infinitely more forgiving in terms of oxidation than beer. We also have as close to a magic bullet there is in meta. I've done a lot of both, and a lot of winemaking best practices would make the average brewer cringe.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why I'm not a big fan of IPA any longer
« on: February 09, 2018, 04:32:03 PM »
I swear these "no IBU" fruit bomb "IPA's" are for people that would rather have a wine cooler but are too embarrassed to order one  :D  :D. But seriously, tons of residual sugar, huge body, no bitterness and fruitiness out the ying yang, that sounds like Bartles and James not an IPA.

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High temp fermentation
« on: February 05, 2018, 05:05:52 PM »
I'll bet you a homebrew that your beer is fine. I always crank the temps on Saisons (ramping one right now using WLP590 French Saison and WLP644 Saccharomyces Bruxellensis Trois) to make sure they attenuate fully. Drinking the incredibly delicious product of the last brew using those yeasts as a split batch saison. RDWHAHB!

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

The key to making sure saison ferment fully (those made with the Dupont stain at least) appears tpo be open fermentation. 

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/experiments/saison-yeast-airlock-vs-open-ferment-does-it-prevent-stall

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-18-saison-under-pressure

if the DuPont strain(s?) are so pressure sensitive, then how do people bottle carb with the strain? The more I've used the DuPont strain the more I become convinced it is a wild sacch.

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