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Messages - Big Monk

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1
Equipment and Software / New Brewing Software
« on: Today at 03:10:59 AM »
I’d like to announce the fruit of a recent collaboration between A.J. deLange and I which I’ve tentatively titled “The deLange-Scott Brewing Engine”.

It is a brewing spreadsheet which incorporates the proton deficit/charge accounting method of pH estimation long lauded by A.J.. Essentially it is a second generation pH estimation algorithm that finally leaves behind color based acidity approximations and other assumptions made by readily available water chemistry software and implements a technically and scientifically sound pH estimation method. In addition, it also allows for recipe input, bitterness estimation, color estimation, volume tracking and equipment profile, and extract estimation (including either No-Sparge or Batch Sparge).

It incorporates the common Low Oxygen brewing features such as metabisulfite dosing for mash and sparge water and Morey equation modifier for accounting for the lack of color pickup in the presence of oxygen.

In addition to a rigorously prepared set of calculations it utilizes the embedded Excel Solver and Macro buttons to offer unparalleled user control over the target pH and amounts of acid/base components to be used.

The sheet will be offered for free but protected to safeguard the integrity of the calculations and algorithm.

It should be available sometime next week following peer review by A.J. and the subsequent comment incorporation, error checking, and final formatting.

2
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« on: Today at 12:58:50 AM »
I think Josh had a blog post similar to this line of discussion on his Beer Simple site. https://www.beer-simple.com/brewing/2018/5/28/lying-lagers-and-the-lagerers-who-lager-them-and-other-lying-beers


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I get, and I agree with, the sentiment of Denny’s question. If you call it a Helles, and it tastes like a Helles, who cares.

I also agree with Bryan in that, if you call it a Helles and it tastes like a Kolsch, it’s a Kolsch.

Part of it could that some people don’t have as discerning of a palate, i.e. a lager is a lager. And that’s fine too. In that case, don’t bother giving it a style name. Just call it a lager.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« on: July 19, 2018, 12:30:53 PM »
^^^^
Helles just means "pale."  Stout just means "big."  Taken at face value, as the terms were originally intended, there's nothing controversial about either of those examples.  Style police need to chillax.  With a stout, Helles, hoppy, hazy ale maybe. 8)

I disagree and here's why: Frankenstein.

I had to explain to my son last night the confusion over the name Frankenstein. Frankenstein is the doctor, not the creature. Except that in nearly every culture aware of the story, Frankenstein is the creature. It has taken root to the point where going back to calling him "The creature" just seems at odds with pop culture.

Is it right to invoke Helles meaning "pale"? Yes. Grammatically and technically, yes. Can we go back to a time where a Helles is any pale beer under the sun? Not likely. I think styles guidelines are mostly nonsense. Yet, Helles is a distinct beer in flavor and appearance from a Pils, or an Export, or a Kolsch, or a Festbier. And they are all pale.

The Brulosophy thing was a joke on my part. They can call whatever they want whatever they'd like. I think there are clear differences between beers of different styles that share some commonalities, and in that regard, style guidelines make perfect sense.


4
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« on: July 19, 2018, 10:02:12 AM »
I have brewed this , it doesn't follow tradition lagering technique but it makes a very enjoyable Helles. I use 029 in the first batch and 34/70 in the second and fermented at 66 degrees ramping at the finish to 72. http://brulosophy.com/recipes/munich-helles/

More on warm fermenting lagers http://brulosophy.com/2017/02/20/yeast-pitch-temperature-pt-2-cool-vs-warm-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/

Calling the Brulosphy Helles a Helles is fightin’ words!

What was it about it that you didn't like?  That made it "not a helles"?

It was a joke. A comical throwback to a odd time in our collective forum existence.
That's how I took it. I mean it was obviously a joke, because calling brülosophy helles "not a helles" is like... ludicrous. Duh, they use an ümlat. How much more aüthentic can one be?

The real funny part is that if they had just called it a Kolsch, which is basically what it is, they never would have gotten any criticism. However, in a day and age when a man or woman can I identify as a dog and/or cat, they can call it whatever they like.

Time to market my 100% Pilsner malt cold fermented Stout. 😜

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: efficiency
« on: July 19, 2018, 02:37:07 AM »
This is just one data point, but I found my efficiency dropped when my mill gap slipped a couple years ago.  I thought it was the grain, initially, but checked the gap with feelers and there was the culprit.  I grind around .025 gap and condition the grain, also, as I like the greater intact husk results I get with conditioning.  BIAB with HERMS recirc and Hochkurz step mash as the process for most of my beers (lagers).

Undamaged husks, finer grind, and recirc is where’s it’s at. Clear wort, smooth lautering and great efficiency.

6
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« on: July 19, 2018, 12:48:20 AM »
I have brewed this , it doesn't follow tradition lagering technique but it makes a very enjoyable Helles. I use 029 in the first batch and 34/70 in the second and fermented at 66 degrees ramping at the finish to 72. http://brulosophy.com/recipes/munich-helles/

More on warm fermenting lagers http://brulosophy.com/2017/02/20/yeast-pitch-temperature-pt-2-cool-vs-warm-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/

Calling the Brulosphy Helles a Helles is fightin’ words! 😁

What was it about it that you didn't like?  That made it "not a helles"?

It was a joke. A comical throwback to a odd time in our collective forum existence.

7
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 11:08:48 PM »
Derek, I watched the conversation unfold. When do you anticipate your development will be complete?


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Probably a few weeks. I’ve written the lion’s share and incorporated A.J.’s troubleshooter (aka the “engine”) but I want A.J. to peer review it before it goes out.

It will be a brewday calculator with extract, volume tracking, sparging incorporated, bitterness (including whirlpool hops), color, and pH estimation. All the Low Oxygen stuff will be there too. 

8
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 10:11:10 PM »
It has no affect on pH. Metabisulfite does however.
But even that, at the levels used (<50ppm,) is within the margin of accuracy of my pH meter.  So I'll call that diddly, too, as a practical matter.

It’s important to track it though. Its -0.1 pH units per 100 ppm. For a modest 20 ppm dose that’s a -0.02 pH drop.

I’ve neen working with A.J. deLange on bringing his proton deficit pH model to the public integrated within a brewing sheet. It’s going to make all other standalone or embedded water calculators obsolete.

A result of that work was finally figuring out that Meta drops pH because by scavenging Oxygen it gives up two hydrogens or 2 mEq of Acid.

9
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 09:42:42 PM »
It has no affect on pH. Metabisulfite does however.

10
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 01:35:05 AM »
Okay, you've got me.  I've been using meta and BTB,  I'll add the AA.   Is there anything else I need to know first?

I don’t think so.

11
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 01:16:17 AM »
...but then I read about AntioxinSBT: “AEB sums it up as:

“A new generation of anti-oxidizing agent. The usage of AntioxinSBT in the brew-house will prevent most of the problems related to oxidation that can occur due to the LOX (lipoxygenase), not only In the early stages but all the way through the life of the beer. After neutralizing the LOX and chelating the metals In the mash tank, all the ingredients from AntioxinSBT completely disappear during boiling.”

The ingredients are listed as Gallotannins, Ascorbic Acid, and Potassium Metabisulfite.” (aka ‘the Trifecta’)

Based on the above, if SBT contains Gallotannins, Ascorbic Acid, and Potassium Metabisulfite, and it is suppose to prevent most of the problems related to oxidation that can occur due to LOX (lipoxygenase), why can’t his Null LOX grain do that in a more elegant way instead? 

The more I read the more confused I become. Thank goodness I don’t have to build a watch to know what time it is.


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Firstly, if you crush with care (intact husks) and exclude oxygen as a general rule, LOX isn’t an issue. Also, anything kilned higher than a Pilsner neutralizes a large portion of the LOX in the malt.

In general:

1.) Metabisulfite is a FAST Oxygen scavenger. It’s there to absorb the major ingress during dough-in;
2.) AA is a SLOW scavenging agent, that works alongside the remaining Meta throughout the mash and boil;
3.) BTB/GT acts to chelate source water metals, malt derived nasties (fats, lipids), etc.

LOX less malt can’t replace any of the three substances above because LOX is the lowest man on the totem pole as far as flavor stability is concerned.

Interesting that AEB only focuses on the oxidation due to LOX and cheating in their product description.


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Especially since they only have a small % of gallotannins.

You are better off building your own:

1.) Pick your Meta dose;
2.) duplicate it with AA;
3.) Dose with BTB per the manufacturer specs.

12
Ingredients / Re: Null-lox Malts from Morebeer
« on: July 18, 2018, 12:54:08 AM »
...but then I read about AntioxinSBT: “AEB sums it up as:

“A new generation of anti-oxidizing agent. The usage of AntioxinSBT in the brew-house will prevent most of the problems related to oxidation that can occur due to the LOX (lipoxygenase), not only In the early stages but all the way through the life of the beer. After neutralizing the LOX and chelating the metals In the mash tank, all the ingredients from AntioxinSBT completely disappear during boiling.”

The ingredients are listed as Gallotannins, Ascorbic Acid, and Potassium Metabisulfite.” (aka ‘the Trifecta’)

Based on the above, if SBT contains Gallotannins, Ascorbic Acid, and Potassium Metabisulfite, and it is suppose to prevent most of the problems related to oxidation that can occur due to LOX (lipoxygenase), why can’t his Null LOX grain do that in a more elegant way instead? 

The more I read the more confused I become. Thank goodness I don’t have to build a watch to know what time it is.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Firstly, if you crush with care (intact husks) and exclude oxygen as a general rule, LOX isn’t an issue. Also, anything kilned higher than a Pilsner neutralizes a large portion of the LOX in the malt.

In general:

1.) Metabisulfite is a FAST Oxygen scavenger. It’s there to absorb the major ingress during dough-in;
2.) AA is a SLOW scavenging agent, that works alongside the remaining Meta throughout the mash and boil;
3.) BTB/GT acts to chelate source water metals, malt derived nasties (fats, lipids), etc.

LOX less malt can’t replace any of the three substances above because LOX is the lowest man on the totem pole as far as flavor stability is concerned.

13
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« on: July 18, 2018, 12:44:22 AM »
I have brewed this , it doesn't follow tradition lagering technique but it makes a very enjoyable Helles. I use 029 in the first batch and 34/70 in the second and fermented at 66 degrees ramping at the finish to 72. http://brulosophy.com/recipes/munich-helles/

More on warm fermenting lagers http://brulosophy.com/2017/02/20/yeast-pitch-temperature-pt-2-cool-vs-warm-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/

Calling the Brulosphy Helles a Helles is fightin’ words! 😁

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: efficiency
« on: July 18, 2018, 12:33:01 AM »
This is an interesting read...it seems a fine crush may be working against you...

http://www.craftbrewersconference.com/wp-content/uploads/ImprovingBrewhouseEfficiency-Havig.pdf
But note they're talking about  brewers doing conventional lautering (like them and me.)  There it makes sense.  But the OP is doing BIAB.  In that case, and especially full volume BIAB, you could grind finer because the flow concerns just don't apply.  I'd  think finer would help in that case.  Same should apply to batch sparge if you can adequately filter the wort.  Anyway, good summary of the issue there.

I just got through listening to the Master Brewer's podcast about this.  He had me going for a while.... but then lost me.  I'm "Havig" a hard time believing that his findings are true for all small brewers.  It's definitely something to think about and play around with, but I'd take great care in assuming either a hard crush or lighter crush is necessarily better or worse or whatever based on just one study.  More experiments are needed.  And like Robert says, any correlation to homebrewing, especially BIAB or batch sparging, is very likely irrelevant.  We as homebrewers need to take great care in determining what stuff from the commercial world we can apply to our stuff at home, and what doesn't fit well with what we are doing.  This might be the perfect example right here.

I think you should put “More experiments are needed.” in your signature.

Personally I like to condition the grain every so slightly to keep the husk intact, allow it to grab better in my simple 2 roller mill, and also so that I can crush a little tighter.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New info on sanitizers
« on: July 17, 2018, 01:57:57 PM »
Im using Distilled water, Bleach and Vinegar for 3 reasons:

1.) It’s dirt cheap;
2.) @ 1 oz./1 oz. per 5 gallons of water it’s no-rinse;
3.) @ that same concentration and the proper pH, Charlie Talley identifies it as a “stone cold killer”.

How much bleach in that mixture and what percentage bleach are you using? I'm cautious.


Most bleach out of the bottle is 5% or 50,000 ppm. I'm careful to replicate Charlie Talley's recommendations to the letter:

http://media.libsyn.com/media/basicbrewing/bbr03-29-07.mp3

He talks about concentration around the  18:00 minute mark.

In General:

1.) Use generic bleach (less sodium hydroxide) and buy small quantities
2.) Check color
3.) Verify %
4.) Use distilled water or RO water
5.) Add 1 oz. Bleach (~ 80 ppm) to the water
6.) Add 1 oz. Vinegar to water

NEVER ADD BLEACH DIRECTLY TO VINEGAR OR VISE VERSA or it will offgas chlorine gas.

...and if you overshoot and pH approaches 4.0, chlorine gas will be released, more effective at killing brewers than microbes.

I don't believe at the 1 oz. Bleach plus 1 oz. Vinegar per 5 gallons water concentration it's possible to go below 5 pH.

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