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Messages - denny

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cryo Hops, more varieties?
« on: November 20, 2017, 09:45:04 AM »
I'd be curious to know who is buying those debittered hops and why.

I understand why the hop suppliers put them on the market. It's the leftovers from creating lupulin powder and other highly refined lupulin products so they are trying to maximize value on their hops. It doesn't cost them anything to put the leftovers into the market but I don't see a big market for them.

I've seen people try them out as an alternative to aged hops in sour beer but so far everybody I've heard from reports back that they got way too much bitterness. That could probably be adjusted with a lesser volume though.

The average AA of the debittered lieaf is 2-3%.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cryo Hops, more varieties?
« on: November 20, 2017, 07:52:55 AM »
Denny, I listened to the YCH guy interview. The cyro makes sense but I must have missed what the use was for debit-leaf. Sarcasm would make me guess you'd use that to add a vegetal flavor, but I bet that's not it at all.

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I haven’t tried them, but I don’t quite get the debittered leaf myself. Muted cascade? Bland Columbus?

I haven't used it yet, so I'm extrapolating based on conversations....to me, it sounds like a bit like "muted" but more like continental hops on that they have flavor but aren't in your face  Just have to brew with them to see.

Just a wild guess, but could you use them in sour beers in place of aged hops? Get some of the antimicrobial characteristics but still be very low (1-2 BU) bitterness?

Yeah, seems like they'd be good for that.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cryo Hops, more varieties?
« on: November 19, 2017, 01:33:36 PM »
Seems kind of interesting, but I guess I don't understand the difference between just using less of the standard hop (non debittered). From another perspective, it's so hard to really know what a hop variety really tastes like. There are so many options, it's hard to brew enough to really know how it'll turn out.

I guess I also don't understand how the cryo hops differ from the normal version-do all of the oils get extracted evenly, or are some oils (linalool/gerianiol/etc.) that don't get extracted? Going to have to listen to that interview again, maybe I missed something.

I think the main difference with cryo is that since they're processed without O2 they retain much more of their "goodies".

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cryo Hops, more varieties?
« on: November 19, 2017, 09:38:29 AM »
Denny, I listened to the YCH guy interview. The cyro makes sense but I must have missed what the use was for debit-leaf. Sarcasm would make me guess you'd use that to add a vegetal flavor, but I bet that's not it at all.

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
I haven’t tried them, but I don’t quite get the debittered leaf myself. Muted cascade? Bland Columbus?

I haven't used it yet, so I'm extrapolating based on conversations....to me, it sounds like a bit like "muted" but more like continental hops on that they have flavor but aren't in your face  Just have to brew with them to see.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cryo Hops, more varieties?
« on: November 18, 2017, 01:06:35 PM »
Anyone out there who has links to some of the hop growers know if more varieties of cryo- hops are coming on the market soon? Denny? Just wondering. Very interested in trying these for whirlpool and dry hopping but would really like if some other varieties were available.   I’m willing to wait a while, but if none are coming anytime soon I’m just going to write some new recipes with what’s available.

My contacts at YCH tell me that there will be more and more varieties becoming available.  How soon?  Dunno.  Don't overlook the debittered leaf, either.  Drew and I are just starting to play with that and it looks really interesting.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How's this water for a porter
« on: November 18, 2017, 09:43:53 AM »
This is something I saved from another site. Take it or leave it. Your choice.


Careful in using those recommendations as they are simplistic, incomplete, and superseded. You would have to read through several hundred posts to figure out all the revisions to that initial post.

Understood. I realize some folks want to deep dive into each element of brewing. That approach is not for everyone e.g. for me close enough is good enough.

For example, I’ve had more than one local pro tell me they don’t add any salts at all. One says they simply filter the water and that’s it. Another says they simply adjust for pH with acid and that’s it. Several awards have been won by both and I personally have sampled most, if not all, of their brews. They are delicious.

So... my takeaway is the whole stress over water seems somewhat over rated and the simple approach above seems within reason. YMMV


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If you brew the same limited range of light lagers that AJ does, that could work.  But most people brew a wider variety of beers and need different water profiles than that.

7
This was a fantastic episode.

I'm definitely reading Jeff's new book.

Thanks!  I thought it was pretty fascinating.  Hope to have Jeff back again for more of this kind of stuff.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Racking techniques
« on: November 17, 2017, 10:59:06 AM »
I used an auto-siphon for years, but I now know that any contact between air and beer will lead to the beer staling quicker. If you consume your beer in weeks and don't sent it to competitions, then there is no reason to use anything but the auto-siphon. For all others, employing CO2 to push beer from one vessel to another is always going to be better for reducing oxidation and staling.

A rubber cap or plug with 2 ports is needed. Gas goes in one port and a racking cane in the other. Don't use more than 1 or 2 psi CO2 pressure.
 

Is there a simple way to purge the ambient air from the cane and tubing in this respect?  I guess one could hook up the CO2 and run it through the cane and tubing for a while before putting it into the cap and hope for the best, but I have been wondering about this and couldn't think of a foolproof, yet simple way to resolve it.

well, you could just not use an auto siphon.  I use a traditional racking cane and tubing.  I fill them with water and use that to start the siphon.  No O2 in the system then.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How's this water for a porter
« on: November 17, 2017, 09:40:01 AM »
Don't base your water on a city profile.  Almost any brewery will adjust the water so basing it on a city profile doesn't get you what you think it does.  Go for a color/flavor profile.

10
Equipment and Software / Re: malt mill
« on: November 16, 2017, 04:23:45 PM »
Just some thoughts on steels and mill rollers-it looks like the BC and JSP use 1018 steel, which is a low carbon steel. That makes it great for machining, but not so great for wear. I believe I saw something about case hardening for the JSP, which is most likely a carburization process. This would make a huge difference in wear life. Looking around, monster mills use 1144 steel, which can be quite a bit harder. I haven't used it (Still using my sweet Corona mill), but if you're spending ~$200 on a mill, you might as well go with a higher grade steel roller.

But what if it doesn't really matter? I've run thousands of lb. of malt through my JSP in the last 20 years and it still preforms like new.  Harder steel wouldn't make any difference if it's perfect as is, right?

11
Equipment and Software / Re: malt mill
« on: November 16, 2017, 09:42:45 AM »
   I'm about ready to hunk my friggin JSP mill, it keeps throwing the rubber O-ring that drives the second roller, unless I crush at a wider gap than I want. Without the O-ring it requires almost twice the torque that it does with the ring in place. What's the point of an adjustable mill if you have to stop to dismantle and repair it 2 or 3 times every grind. What a PITA!

My O ring went 15 years ago and it didn't affect a thing.  I keep the gap as narrow as it will go and have no trouble at all.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Fermentation stopped
« on: November 16, 2017, 08:40:07 AM »
The wort entered fermenter at 79 degrees with an OG of 1.070.
With the lowered temp we think fermentation has slowed but is still active.
There's no way we're going to bottle without a definite assurance that fermentation is complete.
Is a gravity check the best way to know?
I was given the advice to let it sit in the primary fermenter for 3 weeks, to let everything settle.
Good advice?

Holy crap....if you pitched at 79F it likely finished fermentation in just a few days.  Do a gravity check.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: vanilla bean question
« on: November 15, 2017, 01:50:04 PM »
I don't do anything but split them, scrape them and dump them in.  Not necessary to sanitize.

14
Listening to it now, and enjoying it. Stan H. Introduced me to Jeff at Homebrewcon.

I think it's a really great conversation and hope we can do it again.

15
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/brew-files-episode-23-traditional-traditions-jeff

The Brew is Out There!

PROCESS SHOW

Drew sits down with Jeff Alworth, writer of the Beervana blog and podcast and the recent The Secrets of Master Brewers to talk what lessons Jeff discovered while touring a bunch of different brewing cultures. Together they explore the notion of national brewing identities and why many factors, including the Cold War, make the beers of Bohemia radically different from the beers of neighboring Bavaria. Also, does the US have a "brewing identity"?

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