Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - duboman

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 91
1
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Massive Head, Minimal Carbonation in Keg
« on: July 31, 2015, 03:50:33 PM »
Also, once you have reached Steve's lazy carbonation level and still experience excessive head when dispensing, you need to lengthen your lines.  I have 10 plus feet of line for 10 to 12 psi.  I like a nice easy pour down the side of the glass.  If I don't get the head I want then I pour more aggressive, down the middle.  I find it to be very simple just to carb the keg at serving psi and forget it.  It always works out.
+1

2
Beer Recipes / Re: What to brew?
« on: July 30, 2015, 06:58:51 PM »
A simple hoppy pale ale, 90-95% base and 5-10% crystal, a balanced charge of hops at 60 and then flavor/ aroma at 10,5 ,0 and dry hop with a couple oz, should be tasty

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: July 18, 2015, 06:47:49 PM »
Sounds like its moving along well! Your volumes sound about right, my gose with all the transfers finishes at around 4.5 gallons total packaged and I usually bottle it. Since its a sour its not readily consumed so I get to enjoy it for a while and not tie up a keg.

Looking forward to hear how it turns out!

4
All Things Food / Re: Root Beer Rookie
« on: July 10, 2015, 07:41:52 PM »
Yeah, the yeast is there to simply carbonate and PET bottles are typical, you wait until they get rock hard and then put them all in the fridge. Kegging requires no yeast.

5
All Things Food / Re: Root Beer Rookie
« on: July 10, 2015, 03:08:39 PM »
I use the Gnome and like it the best, I believe their website has the recipe for making root beer as well. Its a lot of water and sugar and extract with champagne yeast IIRC.

Keep it simple:)

6
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Thoughts on "fermcap"
« on: July 07, 2015, 06:15:26 PM »
I've seen no problems using a drop or two in a starter. I boil in my flask and use it to prevent a boil over. I also use it in my kettle for the same. No head retention issues or I'll effects on the final product.

Edit: as far as propagation and I'm no expert, attenuation has never been an issue for me.

7
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Out of ideas
« on: July 07, 2015, 06:05:27 PM »
Did you check the faucet, perhaps something got lodged?

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Frustrated beyond belief
« on: July 02, 2015, 02:35:14 PM »
Could be the yeast, are you checking viability and making starters for each beer  with Mr. Malty or Yeast calc.? If the beers are properly fermenting and attenuating and you are not getting hot fusels or other fermentation related issues I'm not sold on it being the yeast.

OTOH, if your supplier is selling you old malt and less than fresh, improperly stored ingredients I would be concerned.

BTW you didn't mention if you were brewing extract or AG, I assumed AG since you have been brewing a long time but descriptors of muddy and heavy have been used when discussing extract batches with less than ideal fresh extract.... liquid specifically but dry as well.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Frustrated beyond belief
« on: July 02, 2015, 02:05:01 PM »
Muddy and heavy are pretty difficult descriptors to pin down to one variable going wrong but I would look specifically at two items: water source and ingredients-specifically how fresh they are.

Have you tried to start with 100% R/O water with calculated additions via brun' water? Have you changed suppliers of your ingredients?

I'd start with one of these first.

10
I'd assume are boil sour since it states boiled for your pleasure:) sounds like a good base for a Gose or Berliner type beer

11
Classifieds / Re: Equipment wanted
« on: June 30, 2015, 03:39:11 PM »
I'm in the process of rebuilding my brewery. I have most of the big things covered, but need some little odds and ends. Figure before I run out and buy new I would check here and see if any of you have some extra stuff on hand you'd like to make a few bucks off of.
 I'm needing all the little things... hydrometer, theif, capper, racking cane. All the little stuff. If you have anything lying around you think I might need let me know and shoot me a price.
 Much appreciaed!!
The stuff you are looking for is all pretty inexpensive, if its not a local pick up the shipping alone might cost the same as the cost of the stuff new, just sayin' ;)

12
Tried and true bottling: use a priming calculator and weigh out the sugar to the gram based on the finished volume of beer. Boil 1 cup water and stir in sugar to dissolve. Allow to cool and add to bottling bucket. Rack finished beer into bucket and the swirling action will mix. Use a bottling wand to fill cleaned and sanitized bottles and cap. Leave bottles to sit for two weeks at 70-80oF, place in fridge for a few days and enjoy.

For the bottles, if you thoroughly rinse each bottle after use with hot water, allow to dry and store safe all you have to do is sanitize prior to bottling. I suggest a Vinator and a bottle tree to make this process quite easy on bottling day.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: classification for beer comp
« on: June 29, 2015, 06:05:29 PM »
If the lime zest and lemon grass is not predominant it might be passed off as the hops so I'd enter that in the blonde category, the other I'd enter in the SFH category. The American wheat you can enter as an American wheat:)

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Anti foam and dry yeast
« on: June 29, 2015, 03:04:20 PM »
Thanks for the explanation, so in my process I rehydrate my dry yeast and aerate the wort with an aquarium pump for about 15 minutes while the CFC fills the primary. Are you saying that the aeration prior to pitching the rehydrated yeast is not necessary and counter productive?

Aeration when pitching dry yeast is not as critical as when pitching a liquid culture.  Whether or not it is detrimental depends on if the culture scrubs the O2 from the wort, which it more than likely does during the exponential phase.  What are your apparent attenuation levels?
Off the top of my head I can't be exact but I can tell you that I've not had any issues achieving my final gravities in the process I use so I'll assume I'm in good shape:)

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Anti foam and dry yeast
« on: June 29, 2015, 12:18:23 PM »
Yes, yeast require O2 through the growth phase

Actually, dry yeast needs nowhere near as much dissolved O2 as liquid yeast. The reason being is that dry yeast is propagated aerobically in a bioreactor.  Propagation in bioreactor allows the glucose content in the medium to be held in a steady state below the Crabtree threshold of 0.3% glucose weigh by volume.   The result is that all growth is via the respirative metabolic pathway.  Propagation via the respirative metabolic pathway results in yeast cells with fully charged ergosterol and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) reserves (it is also over an order of magnitude more efficient).

All reproduction in batch-based liquid yeast propagation and beer fermentation is fermentative because the glucose level is above the Crabtree threshold.  What yeast cells do when O2 is available is shunt it along with a small amount of carbon (sugar is carbon bound to water) to the respirative metabolic pathway for the production of ergosterol and UFAs.

With a batch propagated liquid culture, initial O2 demands are based the point in the process where the cells are harvested.  Pitching a culture when it reaches high krausen places a lower O2 load on the wort because the cells still have ergosterol and UFA reserves.  Waiting until a culture reaches quiescence (i.e., waiting until it ferments out), increases initial O2 requirements because the mother cells that were alive while O2 was still in solution share their ergosterol and UFA reserves with all of their daughter cells.  Allowing culture to proceed beyond high krausen results unnecessary ergosterol and UFA depletion. Reproduction after the end of the exponential phase is for replacement only.
Thanks for the explanation, so in my process I rehydrate my dry yeast and aerate the wort with an aquarium pump for about 15 minutes while the CFC fills the primary. Are you saying that the aeration prior to pitching the rehydrated yeast is not necessary and counter productive?

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 91