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Messages - frochild

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: June 11, 2014, 06:02:39 AM »
:)



2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: June 10, 2014, 09:18:51 PM »
 Just responding to the pedantry above,  should have put a quote in. Thank you all for your insight,  it has been very helpful.



3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: June 10, 2014, 08:45:38 PM »
So my pitch temperature is at least somewhat important to you?   :)

4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: June 10, 2014, 07:53:13 PM »
Did not know that,  very thankful if this is the case.



5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: June 10, 2014, 07:23:57 PM »
SO ... the beer turned out quite well, the swamp cooler must have saved the day?  It is getting a lot of attention and being drunk very vast.  Three different people have tasted it and stated it tasted like a lighter Frambrose minus the sour.  I can only conclude that  if there are off flavors, they are covered up well.  Yet I must say, given its very smooth finish ( thanks to low hops and 2 lbs of honey), I am surprised I cannot detect any.  So this brings me a few points/questions,

1) Given my risk for off flavor, when would I taste them in this particular beer?  When I smell it, at the beginning, throughout,  after I swallow etc?

2) I used honey to create a dry smooth finish and thus one of my biggest fears was that this would get over shadowed by off flavors.  Yet what I got was similar to a previous cru ( the base for this raspberry) that I have made, very mild all but unnoticeable esters with a tiny bit of spice to bring it home.  But with the cru the fermentation temp never got past 66 and took forever ( two months... I only used one starter ).  I know this wit strain is known for low ester with mild spice flavor,  but I still feel like I got away with murder.  Has anyone has similar experiences with this yeast?  Is this what I should have expected?

Here is my Ingredient list:

5 lbs Briess Pilsen light
2 lbs Weyerman pale wheat malt
2 lbs organic wildflower honey ( could care less about organic, but wildflower definitely has a different taste)

1 oz whole Hallertauer hops (boiling)
1/2 oz Hallertauer hops whole flavor
1/2 Hallertauer hops ( aroma)
5 lbs of raspberries held a little over 160 for 20 minutes before being added post boil

Wyeast 3944 - 2 packs




6
All Grain Brewing / Re: No lauter tun
« on: June 04, 2014, 07:17:06 AM »
Ok, perhaps I will just get/make a lauter tun and be done with it.   After partial mashing for years, this is a big step.  Just got my kettle and burner yesterday!

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: No lauter tun
« on: June 02, 2014, 06:36:50 AM »
Both of you guys that is!



8
All Grain Brewing / Re: No lauter tun
« on: June 02, 2014, 06:36:05 AM »
Dude,  what a great idea!  Thanks so much



9
All Grain Brewing / Re: No lauter tun
« on: June 01, 2014, 08:45:52 PM »
I have considered making that,  Charlie's book is my brew bible.  For my partial mashes I was using a grain bag in my bottling bucket.



10
All Grain Brewing / Re: No lauter tun
« on: June 01, 2014, 06:46:03 PM »
I plan on step mashing in the brew kettle,  although I suppose I could just insulate the kettle and do it at one temp.  I had considered putting in a false bottom but figured it more a luxury as to avoid a bag.  Is it possible to do any of the above properly without a false bottom?  I just assume constant mixing/stirring with a slow warming process. I am aware that temps tend to rise a bit even when the heat is off. 

I am just trying to start all grain as simple a possible at this point.



11
All Grain Brewing / No lauter tun
« on: June 01, 2014, 05:28:58 AM »
So,  given that I will soon have a brew pot with a valve,  was wondering what you guys thought about using a grain bag instead of a lauter tun to sparge?



12
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: May 24, 2014, 07:02:42 PM »
It's a raspberry wit based on my success on a few grand Cru recipes  ... minus the coriander and orange. 


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13
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: May 24, 2014, 06:46:43 PM »
Well I kind of winged it based on memory from previous success, but all the recipes I have worked with use fruit right at the beginning.  I love what it does to the flavor.  It comes off very natural just like a good balance between hops and malt.  I don't like overly flavored fruit beers ie Sam Adams cherry wheat( I really dislike that beer).   Anyway the idea is to get the fruit over 160 before chilling and putting into the wort and pitching. Then after about 5 days you strain out the fruit and rack to secondary.


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14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: May 24, 2014, 05:48:29 PM »
When I originally pitched the yeast, I knew I would not kill it.  I just got myself into a time crunch.  I had decided to forgo my tried and true wort chilling procedure for a different technique.  When it did not work,  I had 5 gallons of wort with barely pasteurized raspberries in an open bucket.  I was either going to leave it unattended for 7 to 9 hours uncovered with two kids in the house or pitch yeast, cover, and rapidly cool in basement. Which is what I did.  Of corse as soon as I did that I regretted it.  I had been up all night and just made a bad call.  At this point I realized I needed to lean a few things and came to you guys.  :)


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15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High pitch temperature
« on: May 24, 2014, 07:04:23 AM »
I will agree to that, Belgians type brews are the only ones I ever want to have those any of these flavors ... Yet I sigh at the stupidity that let to me pitching the yeast when I did.  Still going to drink and enjoy whatever comes my way. 


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