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Messages - goschman

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: double kolsch attenuation
« on: July 27, 2016, 09:20:35 AM »
Sounds solid to me as well. 1/2 pound of sugar should help without taking much away from the malt character.

That was kind of my thought. I think it works out 3.6%.

2
All Grain Brewing / double kolsch attenuation
« on: July 27, 2016, 08:43:57 AM »
The time has come for me to begin thinking about brewing this year's xmas beer that will be bottled and stored. This year I am not brewing anything close to a xmas beer and have decided to "imperialize" my kolsch.

The main thing I want to emphasize is high attenuation using WLP029. The plan is to mash at 148F for 90 min and add 1/2 lb table sugar in attempt to get around 85% AA which would put me near a FG of 1.010 and an ABV around 7.6%. I am keeping the OG relatively low at 1.068 so that a lower FG can be achieved. All of this is just goals and estimates obviously. Any other tips or thoughts?

3
Going to brew a pumpkin oktoberfest again. Last year I liked it so much I think it may be a regular fall beer for me. Basically an oktoberfest with a little pumpkin in the mash and spices at the end of the boil. Good stuff.

Sounds good. I have been doing pumpkin versions of beers I grew regularly. Last year it was an altbier and this year I think I am going to go with a pumped up version of my brown ale.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« on: July 26, 2016, 06:55:23 PM »
Isovaleric acid is definitely hop related.

The funny thing about it is that major parts of the population can't even detect it at any level.  I went to the Siebel Sensory Perception class at GABF back in 2009 (God, has it been that long?) and while half the class sipped away at the sample straining to find something wrong, the other half of the class was making gagging noises and looked like they were going to hurl.

Good to know. I read somewhere today that it was usuall hop related but could also have to do with stressed yeast so I thought that might be a culprit. Whatever it is seems to be a byproduct of fermentation which is fading with extended lagering time.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« on: July 26, 2016, 04:30:02 PM »
Just sampled again and the off flavor seems to has dissipated even further. It is tasting more like a Czech pils than an international pale lager which I entered it as. Hopefully not another misentered beer. I assume they will be combining most of the light lager categories.

I am still curious about what is was.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« on: July 26, 2016, 02:13:57 PM »
Sometimes 34/70 throws off a little sulfur, which is more likely to dissipate after a few minutes than isovolaric.  Are you especially sensitive to sulfur compounds?

I don't believe so. I have less than 10 lagers under my belt and have used 34/70 for all of them. I have brewed this particular beer 3 times and have never detected this character. This character has seemed to dissipate after days in the keg but not within minutes in the glass.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« on: July 26, 2016, 02:05:03 PM »
I am trying to identify an off flavor in a pale lager that was brewed with W34/70. It is not very strong and seems to be dissipating. It seems to be something I am very sensitive to. I get a sweaty sock type aroma and taste in the beer however like I mentioned, it is more of a background note. I see stale cheese as a common descriptor however that isn't necessarily what I detect. This beer is in a competition this weekend and I just want to be prepared for the critiques.

My buddy says he doesn't notice it and I have detected it certain pale lagers before at brewpubs where my friends didn't taste or smell it. Is this likely isovaleric acid? Will it continue to dissipate with continued lagering? The two main causes I see are old hops and brett infection which doesn't seem to apply in this circumstance.

8
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: No fermentation after 24 hours.
« on: July 25, 2016, 08:59:33 AM »
When I have a slow starting fermentation I always take off the lid to get a visual.

9
Kegging and Bottling / Re: carbonating keg in 48 hours
« on: July 25, 2016, 07:54:59 AM »
Thanks for the help all. I got it reasonably carbed up but the the hop character is extremely pungent right now from the keg hops. It was necessary to rush but no harm done.

10
Beer Recipes / Re: first saison
« on: July 23, 2016, 08:29:59 AM »
Fermentation recommendations?

It took off very quickly and is currently at 64F. I was thinking about keeping it at 64-65 for the first couple of days, ramping to 68 for a couple more, then letting free rise up to 75 or so.


It depends on the strain and what you're after. Your plan would work fine, or to get a little more of the yeast character (which I like in saison) you could hold at 67F-ish for a couple days , then just let rise and hold at ~ 75F. It'll be good regardless.

Thanks Jon. I think this time around I am going to restrain it just a bit. Saison for beginners if you will. I am just starting to get into Belgians and Saisons can be a little hit and miss for me. I am thinking keeping it a bit more neutral this go around to see how I like it. In my mind, I am thinking about more of 'cleaner' Saison. Blasphemy, I know...

11
Beer Recipes / Re: first saison
« on: July 23, 2016, 08:14:16 AM »
Fermentation recommendations?

It took off very quickly and is currently at 64F. I was thinking about keeping it at 64-65 for the first couple of days, ramping to 68 for a couple more, then letting free rise up to 75 or so.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: first saison
« on: July 22, 2016, 06:36:31 PM »
Pale yellow color is perfect for a summer saison and will pair well with the lemony theme. Also, once you get some carbonation into it, I bet the basil character will pop a bit more. Let us know how it turns. Sounds like it will be awesome late August.

Thanks man. I am excited for something different from my usual.

13
Kegging and Bottling / Re: carbonating keg in 48 hours
« on: July 22, 2016, 04:13:33 PM »
Agreed that 30-35 psi for 48 hrs (providing your beer is cold enough) should get you carbed enough.

Thanks! The beer was at 34f when I transferred it to the keg.

14
Beer Recipes / Re: first saison
« on: July 22, 2016, 03:12:08 PM »
Just finished brewing this. Hit my numbers which happens about 25% of the time or less so that is good. Went with the 90 minute mash at 148F so hoping that this sucker gets below 1.005 and hopefully 1.003.

I decided to go with 3/4 oz of centennial added with the lemon zest and basil at 5 min. The lemon/basil character seemed pretty mild in the sample so I am assuming it is not really going to carry through to the final product. I only went with 12 g of basil as it seemed like a lot so I wish I would have went with the full 1/2 oz. I may consider adding some more to the fermenter or just leaving it. Wishing I would have added another malt to provide some color which was probably suggested. It look like it is definitely going to be a pale yellow color.

15
Kegging and Bottling / Re: carbonating keg in 48 hours
« on: July 22, 2016, 01:44:24 PM »
Ok so there isn't one psi I can leave it at for 48 hours to get it reasonably carbed up?

I thought I have seen on brulosophy that they carb at 50psi for 24 hours of something.



Ok, for 48 hrs, I leave it at 30psi/40F. That gets it close, then I drop down to serving pressure. As for the 24 hour plan, 40psi won't vent the regulator but I do know that some regulators will let you go higher. 30psi x 2 days or 40psi-ish X 1 day would be safest. Or the shake method which I'm not a huge fan of.

Just looking for 48 hours so I should be good. Thanks!

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