Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - erockrph

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 405
1
Other Fermentables / Re: Choice of honey for mead
« on: November 10, 2017, 07:43:05 AM »
I'll second the choice of a local wildflower if you can get it in bulk at a decent price. Otherwise, a lighter honey like orange blossom, clover, berry blossom, etc. is a good base.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Ratcheting up malt flavor
« on: November 02, 2017, 06:45:11 AM »
What's your water look like? Try to get your sodium to at least 50 ppm and Cl to at least 100 ppm. While you don't want a heavy hand on your minerals, you need some to help your flavors pop. I'd also make sure your mash pH is in the 5.3ish range. Higher pH tends to muddy flavors a bit, while lower pH makes them pop a bit more. Just like any other form of cooking, you need your seasoning right and the right amount of acidity to bring out the flavors in your beer.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Holiday Cranberry Ale help
« on: November 01, 2017, 05:50:24 AM »
I use fresh cranberries in mead. Just pulled them in a food processor and put them in a mesh bag in the fermenter and they give all their flavor and color.
Why have I never tried this instead of my convoluted freeze/smash/freeze/smash procedure?  ???

This makes me wish that my chickens didn't eat all my cranberries this year. I have a cider ready to keg and cranberry cider is awesome.

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: Briess copper malt
« on: November 01, 2017, 05:40:11 AM »
I haven't tried it, because Briess malt is just so grainy...  ;)

I did, however, recently try the Franco-Belges Kiln Coffee malt in an English brown porter, and I'm quite pleased with it.
That's the secret ingredient in my brown ales (I need to brew one soon, now that I mention it). It has a nice roast that's a bit different than chocolate malt in flavor, but in the same ballpark.
Whats a good % for that coffee malt in a brown?

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

I used 4% and it's apparent without dominating.  I also threw in 4% oak-smoked wheat malt, going for the "cowboy coffee" experience.  I don't think the smoke character came through much at all, other than adding a bit of dryness to the back end of the bittering.  Loving the coffee character.  It's not an espresso character.  I think it blends really well with the chocolate malt and brown malt.
Awesome,  Thank you.  I was thinking 5% or so in an Imperial Brown with maple syrup.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
That sounds just right to me. I use 4% in my Oatmeal brown with a fair amount of Dark/Extra Dark Crystal malt and occasionally some vanilla as well. I think it makes a nice counterpoint to balance out sweet flavors in a brown ale. It should be great in a maple brown.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 staggered yeast pitches
« on: October 30, 2017, 07:38:25 PM »
I'd either copitch or pitch the expressive yeast first. If you pitch it later, then you may get very little character out of the expressive yeast because it isn't growing, it may be less active, and some of the substrates that it uses to produce flavor compounds may have already been used up by the primary yeast.

For example, WL Sacch Trois (the formerly incorrectly-labeled Brett Trois), does absolutely nothing when added as a secondary yeast. Also, I have used a couple of English ale strains as a copitch with US-05. None of those beers have had any esters that I normally associate with those strains when used alone. Some of that may be from overpitching, but I think some of that is also from the possible causes I mentioned above.

So the logic would be to copitch? If the fear that a second yeast pitch will not be expressed why would I want to go with a neautral yeast second?
There's no way to know for sure for a particular combo unless you try it, unfortunately. A copitch is probably the best place to start. Otherwise, if you're dead-set on nailing it the first time around, then a blend is the only way to go.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: Briess copper malt
« on: October 30, 2017, 07:28:55 PM »
I haven't tried it, because Briess malt is just so grainy...  ;)

I did, however, recently try the Franco-Belges Kiln Coffee malt in an English brown porter, and I'm quite pleased with it.
That's the secret ingredient in my brown ales (I need to brew one soon, now that I mention it). It has a nice roast that's a bit different than chocolate malt in flavor, but in the same ballpark.

7
Beer Recipes / Re: Holiday Cranberry Ale help
« on: October 27, 2017, 08:35:05 AM »
Fresh cranberries will give less character than would expect compared to other berries. Cranberries just don't break down either by freezing or by soaking in beer/cider. Concentrate or good quality 100% juice will gie you a lot more control over your end result.

If you do choose to use berries, put them through 2 freeze/thaw cycles and crush them after each thaw to help them break up better. I am always amazed at how well my berries hold up after a hard frost, and even after a year in the freezer they are pretty firm after thawing (just ask my ducks lol).

8
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 staggered yeast pitches
« on: October 27, 2017, 08:23:02 AM »
I'd either copitch or pitch the expressive yeast first. If you pitch it later, then you may get very little character out of the expressive yeast because it isn't growing, it may be less active, and some of the substrates that it uses to produce flavor compounds may have already been used up by the primary yeast.

For example, WL Sacch Trois (the formerly incorrectly-labeled Brett Trois), does absolutely nothing when added as a secondary yeast. Also, I have used a couple of English ale strains as a copitch with US-05. None of those beers have had any esters that I normally associate with those strains when used alone. Some of that may be from overpitching, but I think some of that is also from the possible causes I mentioned above.

9
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Priming with AJC for bottling (cider)
« on: October 27, 2017, 07:54:17 AM »
It depends on how much sugar you are adding. In general, each gravity point adds about half of a volume of CO2. The typical ferment ends up at around 1 volume of CO2 before priming, and a bottled cider would probably range from 2.0 vol to 3.0 vol of CO2. You'd want to add enough concentrate to add 2-4 gravity points to whatever your FG measures as.

In other words, if your cider finished at 1.000, you want to add enough concentrate to get between 1.002 (light fizz)  to 1.004 (very fizzy). I'd target the middle range, personally.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: medicinal bite - astringency?
« on: October 27, 2017, 07:45:49 AM »
The character I'm referring to is a harsh, vegetal bitterness more than astringency. It may be that Polyclar helps diminish this (I haven't done a side-by-side to compare relative amounts of this character), but it certainly doesn't eliminate it in my experience.

The fine hop particle idea jives with my experience that whole cone hops don't cause this issue. My only issue with this is that in my experience this harsh bitterness never fully goes away. You would think that particles in suspension would drop out completely if given enough time.

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg Conditioning with Sinamar
« on: October 23, 2017, 06:21:31 AM »
But ya know, there,s more to a porter than just color.  I wonder how close you'll get by just making it darker.

That is exactly the question i want answered. I suspect 4 oz of sinamar in a keg will add more than just color.
It will add more than just color, but not very much. Unless you have a lot of roast in your brown ale already it will fall far short of a porter.

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: Darkening Malt
« on: October 23, 2017, 06:18:09 AM »
I use Brewer's Caramel. It works similar to Sinamar, but with even less flavor impact. I did pay a bit of a premium to have it shipped from the UK, though. I don't think I'd pay that price again when I could just use Midnight Wheat instead.

That roasted bitter flavor from fine-ground, highly roasted malts is often from fine particulates that take a while to fully drop clear. Cold-conditioning usually reduces this over time.

What's less than none?  ;)

And at typical usage rates I can't disagree with that.

I was able to take a pale Pils up to dark Schwarzbier in color and couldn't detect any change in flavor with caramel. For that big of a color swing, I can pick up a hint of roast from Sinamar.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Darkening Malt
« on: October 22, 2017, 11:39:14 AM »
I use Brewer's Caramel. It works similar to Sinamar, but with even less flavor impact. I did pay a bit of a premium to have it shipped from the UK, though. I don't think I'd pay that price again when I could just use Midnight Wheat instead.

That roasted bitter flavor from fine-ground, highly roasted malts is often from fine particulates that take a while to fully drop clear. Cold-conditioning usually reduces this over time.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: medicinal bite
« on: October 22, 2017, 11:29:29 AM »
Take a look at this...http://scottjanish.com/researching-new-england-ipa-neipa-haze/

I've brewed very hazy IPA's using DME as my only fermentable, so this certainly jives with my experience.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: medicinal bite
« on: October 22, 2017, 09:48:18 AM »
Many people have noted harsh, unpleasant polyphenols from the high late hopping in NEIPA.  Could that be it?

Kind of my assumption however 4 oz at the end of the boil and 6 oz dry is nothing compared to what a lot of people use. Are you referring to the hops at the end of the boil?

My IPA's aren't exactly the NEIPA style, but they share the heavy late hopping and minimal (zero, in my case) bittering charge. I get a similar harsh bitterness (kind of an herbal/medicinal bitter quality) in many of my IPA's, and quite a few commercial examples as well. Most of my IPA experimentation in recent years has been to try to get rid of this character while maintaining the intense hop flavor that I love in my IPA's.

Here's some of what I've found:

- I notice this starting at about 1.5-2 ounces of hops per gallon, and it gets more noticible at higher hopping rates
- Polyclar and gallotannin gave both failed to reduce this character
- I have gotten this from whirlpool-only beers (i.e., no dry hops or bittering charge). That's not to say that it can't come from dry hops, but it definitely can come from whirlpool hops
- Pellet hops and cryo hops both give this type of bitterness at high hopping rates
- I do not get this character when a significant portion of my hops are whole cone

I still have some further testing to confirm, but my current working hypotheses are:

- Chopped up vegetative material in pellet hops has a greater surface area for releasing whatever is causing this flavor.
- Heat may increase the extraction of this character. A good test would be having a moderate bittering charge and a massive dry hop addition only, with no late-boil hops.
- Leaf hops may help pull/keep this out of the finished beer when used in conjunction with pellet hops. I'm not quite sold on this yet, but the couple of times I've used both types together I've had the best results in my IPA's.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 405