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Messages - erockrph

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 387
1
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: February 27, 2017, 09:10:39 AM »
Of the three the only one I still haven't tried is Lagavulin...I don't know if the Ron Swanson character made it so popular that it sells before I find it or what.

Yeah, I love Laphroaig, too. Awesome stuff. But Lagavulin is pretty sublime IMO, too. And I bet 'Ron Swanson' drove up the interest and maybe the price a bit.
I highly recommend Talisker if you like the peatiest/smokiest Islay malts. The distillery is on the coast of the Isle of Skye, and must have a similar ocean climate. The character is very similar to something like Lagavulin. Talisker doesn't seem to get as much attention as the distilleries on Islay, but it is right up there with them if that's your type of Scotch.

2
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 tap kegerator
« on: February 27, 2017, 08:49:24 AM »
I have an actual 3-tap kegerator that is a really, really tight squeeze for 3 kegs as-is, and it is bigger than any dorm fridge I've ever seen. Depending on the compressor location, you might have a hard time fitting even one 2.5 gallon keg in a dorm fridge, let alone three 5-gallon kegs.
What's the make and model of your fridge?

This project might be a long shot, but I'm hoping to make it happen.

This is the one I have:

http://beermeistersupplies.com/beer-dispensing/kegerators/homebrew/triple-tower-with-black-door-homebrew-value-line-no-kegs-included.html

By all means, don't let me talk you out of your project. Half the fun is getting there, which is why most of us homebrew in the first place :)
Thanks! It doesn't give the make and model number of the fridge, but it does give the dimensions which are very helpful.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
I've heard that Beermeister rebadges their fridges, but I have no idea what the equivalent manufacturer and model number is.

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 01:24:01 PM »
I have use different strains from what I'm brewing with and found a difference of 4 points between the FFT and the actual finishing gravity.  That was for a 1968 (batch, 1.012) vs US05 (FFT, 1.008) test. 

I guess it all depends on what you are looking for.  If you want to know when you are 3-5 points from finishing gravity (as in the spunding in the keg situation) then it would seem that you need the same strain.  If you just need to know if you have reasonably fermentable wort (as in the stuck ferment situation), then it would seem like the strain would be largely irrelevant.

Agreed!
Me too!

4
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 tap kegerator
« on: February 26, 2017, 12:37:20 PM »
I have an actual 3-tap kegerator that is a really, really tight squeeze for 3 kegs as-is, and it is bigger than any dorm fridge I've ever seen. Depending on the compressor location, you might have a hard time fitting even one 2.5 gallon keg in a dorm fridge, let alone three 5-gallon kegs.
What's the make and model of your fridge?

This project might be a long shot, but I'm hoping to make it happen.

This is the one I have:

http://beermeistersupplies.com/beer-dispensing/kegerators/homebrew/triple-tower-with-black-door-homebrew-value-line-no-kegs-included.html

By all means, don't let me talk you out of your project. Half the fun is getting there, which is why most of us homebrew in the first place :)

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 12:24:37 PM »
Same species, not same strain. I couldn't imagine brewing a batch with 3711, then pitching a packet of Windsor for my FFT. They wouldn't finish anywhere near each other. I would think that the most applicable results would be with the strain you are pitching.

Thanks for the correction.  I think you overlook that for an FFT you pitch a huge amount of yeast into a small amount of wort.  That pretty much eliminates the differences.  And remember, the purpose of an FFT (at least for me and most) is to test the limit of attenuation, not the performance of the yeast.

I guess where I'm getting hung up here is that if a particular strain of yeast can't break down certain sugars, but another can, then you're not getting an accurate picture of the limit of attenuation for the beer that you're brewing.

Back to my earlier example, 3711 finishes anywhere from 1.002-1.008 for me like clockwork, but I can't imagine a bread yeast getting down that far. And if you have a bread yeast that can ferment maltotriose, then Windsor couldn't get down as far as the bread yeast. The wort composition determines fermentability, but the yeast+wort determines attenuation.

6
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bread Yeast for FFT?
« on: February 26, 2017, 11:48:03 AM »
Do the types of sugars that the bread yeast will consume roughly line up with what brewers yeast consumes, as in there aren't a bunch more that bread yeast will eat?

Yep.  Remember that originally bakers got their yeast from brewers. Same yeast strain.
Same species, not same strain. I couldn't imagine brewing a batch with 3711, then pitching a packet of Windsor for my FFT. They wouldn't finish anywhere near each other. I would think that the most applicable results would be with the strain you are pitching.

7
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« on: February 26, 2017, 11:28:32 AM »
I almost always drink Ardberg with a little water. Just put a few drops in, smell it, and continue till it kinda opens up some. It's really good stuff.

That's my MO for tasting any scotch. Sipping might be done on ice, but when I really want to dig into the flavor and aroma. it's neat with a splash of water.

I waffle back and forth a bit, but Ardbeg is possibly my favorite Islay distillery. I find Ardbeg to have the most peaty/smoky character out of three south coast Islay distilleries, which are generally the peatiest of all the Islay distilleries.

8
The Pub / Re: Songs you never want to hear again.
« on: February 26, 2017, 10:00:48 AM »
You guys that don't like Boston don't own the LPs and don't really understand what it is like to hear that music played loud, and not just the radio songs (though all of their songs up until the 2nd side of Amanda are pretty much awesome). "Don't Look Back" is so freakin' awesome. Those guys were mind blowingly talented.

I assume by those guys you mean Tom and Brad because from what I recall, Tom played everything on the albums and Brad sang all the vocals. Might have just been the demos, though. I can't even answer this question because other than pop stuff, I still listen to most of the stuff from my youth. I just got off a cruise a couple weeks ago with bands like Y&T, KIX, Winger, etc. and I'm going see Maiden a couple times this summer as well as Chicago Open Air.

Almost bought tickets to see Iron Maiden this tour...opted to go see the Metallica tour instead. Stoked to see A7X and Volbeat. Iron Maiden's supporting act, Ghost, can't hold a candle to those two.
Yeah, Ghost isn't horrible, but they're just about the most overrated heavy band out there (I'm reluctant to even refer to them as metal).

It looks like we're getting Volbeat only at my show. I haven't heard much of them, but I'll have to check them out before the show. I'm just bummed that Gojira is playing the end of the tour and I'm going to miss them. They're about the best new metal band to hit the scene in the past decade or so, IMO.

9
Equipment and Software / Re: filter any good?
« on: February 26, 2017, 09:43:14 AM »
I wish it had a smaller barb so I could use it to jump from my fermentation keg to my serving keg.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Trimmed Dip Tube when Spunding?
« on: February 26, 2017, 09:20:31 AM »
I don't spund, but I do ferment in kegs, so I'm not sure if my procedure might differ from yours. I don't trim my dip tubes. When I'm ready to transfer to a serving keg, I just blow out a few ounces through a picnic tap until it runs mostly clear. Then I close the tap for 5-10 seconds and repeat. I keep doing this until it stays clear, then switch to my keg jumper. My kegged beer might be chunky for the first couple of pints, but it's not generally any worse than when I used buckets and an autosiphon to transfer.

Yeast flocculance also makes a difference. I find that flocculant yeast tend to stay in the fermenter better, and more powdery yeast will end up taking longer to clear in the serving keg.

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 tap kegerator
« on: February 26, 2017, 09:07:41 AM »
I have an actual 3-tap kegerator that is a really, really tight squeeze for 3 kegs as-is, and it is bigger than any dorm fridge I've ever seen. Depending on the compressor location, you might have a hard time fitting even one 2.5 gallon keg in a dorm fridge, let alone three 5-gallon kegs.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: CAP recipe
« on: February 22, 2017, 03:43:53 PM »
I don't fear 2o-25% corn. With 6 row it cuts the protein and lightens the grainy 6 row flavor. I haven't done one with 2 row yet, but 2 row has much more DP than it used to, so it should work just fine.

The Cluster hops at bittering add an old school flavor that makes me think of the sips of dad's and grandps's beers I had when a kid. That was back when the mainstream beers had some hops and flavor.

+1

I agree, I like corn over rice by a long shot.  Think corn bread vs. regular bread.  There's a sweetness and grainy flavor that is really clean and refreshing, particularly on a hot summer day.

I had my fair share of reservations about brewing with corn until I actually used it for the first time last summer. Now I'm looking for excuses to include it in recipes. The cornbread analogy is nice, although the sweetness and corn flavor is subtle and not overpowering at up to 20% or so of the grist. I really enjoy what it brings to a lighter-bodied beer.

I'm considering adding corn to a bitter some day, seems that more than a couple British brewers used it.

That sounds like a tasty idea. I might have to try that myself.

13
FYI, your choice of chalk was likely the reason your mash pH still ran low. It's not all that soluble in the mash.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


14
Beer Recipes / Re: beer tastes and kinds
« on: February 20, 2017, 08:05:31 PM »
I agree with big Scottish Ales and Doppelbocks - these are definitely what jumps to mind when I think malty sweet. American Amber is another choice. And if yeast character is important, then I'd go with Dunkelweizen.

15
Ingredients / Re: First lager- Vienna lager
« on: February 20, 2017, 08:01:03 PM »
Sterling, Mt. Hood, Liberty, and Crystal, and Ultra are pretty much interchangeable, and all are delicious.
In a recipe like this, definitely.

To the OP, your recipe looks tasty - and it should be ready in plenty of time for Cinco de Mayo. I'm brewing my first Vienna lager in a couple of weeks myself, but I'm shooting for something closer to Negra Modelo. One of my brewing goals for this year is trying to keep something seasonal on tap at the appropriate times, and Vienna fits the bill for the spring.

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