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Messages - erockrph

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 391
1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Mangrove Jacks French Saison strain
« on: April 24, 2017, 08:21:05 AM »
Add feedback on your experience with it if you don't mind.

Yes, please. I know others prefer more traditional saison strains, but 3711/Belle is one of my personal favorites.

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: High Pressure Lager Yeast
« on: April 24, 2017, 08:17:39 AM »
I brew smaller batches (~3 gallons in primary), so headspace isn't really an issue for me in a 5-gallon corny. That said, if you're under 15 PSI in a closed vessel, I can't imagine needing much headspace - especially for a lager yeast.

What are you brewing with it? I have two vials, myself. I'm thinking either CAP or something Pabst-ish for my first, and then something like a Dunkel or Helles with the 2nd.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Question for IPAs and Mineral Additions
« on: April 24, 2017, 07:22:00 AM »
A) I agree with the pH target close to 5.4 for Pale Ales and IPA's. 5.2 is a good target for lagers and Belgians, but I think it might muddy things a bit for hoppy ales.

B) Tasty knows IPA's, so it is worth it to try his water as is.

C) That said, after trying higher sulfate levels, I've found that my own taste is for much lower levels in my IPA's. I don't go over 200ppm any more, and typically use 125-150ppm. Like I said, you should absolutely try Tasty's water as-is. But if you find the beer to be too minerally for your tastes, then you my want to try something like 150ppm in a future batch for comparison.

4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast
« on: April 22, 2017, 08:43:19 AM »
To OP's point I don't have anything to add from Wyeast's availability but people who like the Unibroue strain tend to love it deeply and you could probably find somebody who has some slurry they could share. If not here, maybe on one of the facebook homebrewing groups or HBT.

All the more reason why I find it strange that none of the yeast labs (including the new upstarts like giga/omega/yeast bay/etc.) seem to offer this as a year-round strain.

When I use it, I try to start with a low-gravity beer and bottle condition at least part of the batch. I've been successful at stepping it back up off of my own bottle dregs as old as the 2-year old ballpark.

5
There are a few here...https://www.experimentalbrew.com/session-beer-day-recipe-bonanza-14-recipes-you-brew

Thanks for posting those. I've been concerned about my low FGs using invert, but haven't cared too much because the beer has been delicious. Even mashing at 146ish for 90 minutes, my FGs with ~10% invert have been around 1.004-1.006.

You ought to try invert Denny! I swear it adds a hard/rock candy flavor to the beers, and dries them up a touch.

Is this specific to homemade invert, or does Lyle's Golden syrup get you the same results?

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I'm In A Slump
« on: April 22, 2017, 07:44:14 AM »
Great point made by all. For me sometimes it comes down to trying LESS new things.

This is it for me. I am always trying out something new, and this can be risky. If you brew a couple of batches in a row that don't turn out as you hoped, then it can fill your homebrew pipeline with a bunch of beer that you're not excited about drinking. I haven't been able to brew as much as I'd like over the past year or two, so it can take a while to bounce back from that.

For me, this means brewing a couple of batches of beers that I know I love to refill my homebrew pipeline. For me, it's my Märzen, my session English IPA, or an IPA that stays close to a proven winner in the past (it's hard for me not to experiment at least a little when it comes to IPA's). If you have to experiment, keep it to small tweaks of a proven recipe (like maybe changing a hop variety or two, but not quantities/procedure; or maybe trying a new yeast strain).

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewtan Experiment Writeup
« on: April 22, 2017, 05:06:27 AM »
IMHO BrewTan B is just a repackaged, target marketed, and overpriced version of one (or a mix) of these readily available products.

That's almost like calling 10W-30 a repackaged, target marketed  and overpriced version of a combination of crude oil products.

What you consider overpriced, many others will consider as "value-added", and worth the extra cash to acquire in proven, ready-to-use format.

That said, I'm probably going to get a packet of the Scottlab FT Blanc for the hell of it the next time I place a MoreBeer order. I'm not currently a Brewtan user, but for a couple of bucks I'd be willing to try the wine product. I'm probably going to brew a light-ish lager with at least one of my tubes of WLP925, so I'll give this a go then.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewtan Experiment Writeup
« on: April 21, 2017, 10:22:31 AM »
Once you dive in, it is pretty interesting how many different tannin varieties there are out there. Scott labs alone markets 11 separate products:

http://www.scottlab.com/uploads/documents/downloads/324/ScottTan.pdf

From the descriptions, it sounds like the FT Blanc is closest to what we're looking for.

The FT Blanc Soft is available at a few places, inclusing MoreWine, at reasonable enough prices to try it for yourself:

https://morewinemaking.com/products/tannin-ft-blanc-soft.html

9
This was originally billed as an IPA, but this is really just a standard bitter with a touch more hops. This has become one of my all-time favorites, and will be one of the beers I brew with the 033:

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Whitbread IPA (1957)
Author: Pattinson/England

Brew Method: BIAB
Style Name: Ordinary Bitter
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 3 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 4 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.027
Efficiency: 80% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.037
Final Gravity: 1.012
ABV (standard): 3.3%
IBU (tinseth): 36.79
SRM (morey): 6.28

FERMENTABLES:
2.625 lb - United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (77.1%)
5 oz - United Kingdom - Crystal 45L (9.2%)
7.5 oz - Invert Sugar (13.8%)

HOPS:
0.3 oz - Fuggles, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.5, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 10.47
0.6 oz - East Kent Goldings, Type: Pellet, AA: 5, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 17.88
0.6 oz - East Kent Goldings, Type: Pellet, AA: 5, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 8.44


My only question is how much to pitch for a 3-gallon batch. I'm thinking maybe 1/3 of a tube.

The other bitter I will be brewing is a simple 80% Pale Ale malt, 12% sugar and 8% torrified wheat.

I may also dabble in a recipe using flaked maize. This has become a favorite ingredient of mine, and in reading Ron Pattinson's blog it seems that a surprising number of UK breweries have used it over the years in their bitters.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewtan Experiment Writeup
« on: April 20, 2017, 12:10:08 PM »
People using municipal source water and copper components are going to immediately see and taste a difference for sure. The impact of Brewtan B alone is going to decrease the farther away from those variables you get.
Any idea whether BTB is beneficial for iron and manganese as well? I would assume if it chelates copper, then it should handle most heavy metal ions, but chelating agents can be wierd about that sometimes.

11
Hop Growing / Re: 2017 Season
« on: April 18, 2017, 02:39:03 AM »
This is year two for my Sterling, Pacific Gem and Sorachi Ace plants. The recent hot weather set them all into action. I noticed several bines poking through the soil on each of them today, and had to move them from their winter location out to where I grow them in season (they're in containers).

Year 1 went pretty well, so I'm looking forward to a good season. I need to move them to larger planters soon before they start taking off.

12
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sam Adams Fresh as Helles
« on: April 15, 2017, 01:01:14 PM »
I experienced it more as a malty helles taste than a blonde and barely detected just a touch of the orange blossom.  I really enjoyed it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I never get any of the typical malt character of European lagers from Sam's lagers, and that's why I think I compare them more to ale styles usually.

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


13
Commercial Beer Reviews / Sam Adams Fresh as Helles
« on: April 14, 2017, 09:17:31 AM »
I ordered this at my local Uno's after seeing the name, but not knowing anything about the beer. The first taste left me a bit disappointed, as I was hoping for something resembling a traditional helles. But then the hops kicked in on the finish and I fell in love with the beer. Think blonde ale with a big kick of Mandarina Bavaria on the finish, rather than a Helles with orange petals. I got a nice citrus character, but to me it was primarily hops rather than floral.

I'm not always a fan of Sam's seasonal offerings, but I will be drinking this all spring as I see it on tap. 

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentis BE-134
« on: April 14, 2017, 09:03:12 AM »
I hope its not belle saison in a different package. Not talking down on that yeast, but It'd be great if it was a different yeast for varieties sake. The specs seem different.

we seem to be entering a golden age of saison yeast. Every few weeks another comes out.
If I had to guess, I'd bet on Dupont. But at the very least it should be different than Belle Saison, since the description does say that it's a Belgian yeast. Belle=French=3711, in my opinion.



If it really is Dupont, I'd be curious to see how it ferments compared to 3724, which we know is great and finicky. A less stall prone version would interest me if the flavor profile were comparable.
Even if it hits the same stall, you could copitch Belle just like you could copitch 3711+3724

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fermentis BE-134
« on: April 14, 2017, 08:49:53 AM »
I hope its not belle saison in a different package. Not talking down on that yeast, but It'd be great if it was a different yeast for varieties sake. The specs seem different.

we seem to be entering a golden age of saison yeast. Every few weeks another comes out.
If I had to guess, I'd bet on Dupont. But at the very least it should be different than Belle Saison, since the description does say that it's a Belgian yeast. Belle=French=3711, in my opinion.

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