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Messages - Gordonwerks

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Going Pro / Re: Craft & Homebrew Supply Startup
« on: April 07, 2014, 12:49:42 PM »
standard 2-row is the obvious one. going into the summer we sell a lot of pilsner and malted wheat. a variety of crystal malts and lots of carapils. roasted barley and chocolate malts go a long way so you won't need as much of those. out of curiosity, which supplier are you going to be using? we use a few different ones.
BSG Handcraft for now. They have a local warehouse. They will be supplying 80% of what I need for the initial opening. If they are good, I might keep them around.

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Going Pro / Re: Craft & Homebrew Supply Startup
« on: April 07, 2014, 12:46:49 PM »
Well... let me clarify. The shop will provide supplies for home brew enthusiasts. For making beer, wine.

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Going Pro / Craft & Homebrew Supply Startup
« on: April 07, 2014, 11:30:09 AM »
I will be opening a Craft & Homebrew supply shop in a matter of months. You can count them on one hand. Kinda exciting... kinda scary. I need to order malt. I have a vendor that supplies grains from eleven different suppliers. Each supplier, supplies a number of different regional grains. In an effort not to overstock, under stock and not break the bank. I looking for a comprehensive opinion of what I will need to stock a lot and a little of. I realize this question itself may be more regional than I want. What do I need to keep 500 pounds of and what do I need to keep just a 10 pound bag of?

Your opinion is greatly considered.


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Wood/Casks / White Oak 5 gal. Cask for Christmas
« on: January 04, 2014, 10:35:11 AM »
So, my kids gave me a White Oak 5 gal. Cask for Christmas. Instructions said to fill with hot water and wait for the leaks to seal. This I have done over the last two days. No leaks. However, the water level continues to lower. Is it soaking up the water? Is that good? I will be making a bourbon stout (Dragons Milk) soon and want to condition the beer in the cask after fermentation. What would my next step be to prepare the cask?

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast starter life span.
« on: December 16, 2013, 06:01:44 PM »
Thanks to all that responded. This is good info from good sources. Man, only if the government could work this close. I've not stated this before, but thanks to the ABA and the forum, I had 65 views on this inquiry in less than an hour. So, my yeast is safe! On with the creation of Caribou Slobber. It a brown ale and I can wait!

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Yeast and Fermentation / Yeast starter life span.
« on: December 16, 2013, 04:06:52 PM »
I made a yeast starter two days ago, with hopes to brew yesterday. That did not happen. So, three days later, I'm wondering what my time limit is. Should I let it continue to stir? Should I add more DME mixture? I may get to brew tomorrow at the best.

Thanks for your replys!

Yeasty Boys (and girls) United!

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General Homebrew Discussion / Home Brew Supply Startup
« on: August 12, 2013, 07:53:48 AM »
I am contemplating (rather seriously) about starting a Craft Beer and Home Brew Supply. All the standards (beer, wine kits) as well as a growler bar and selection of regional craft beer. My question is: What keeps you going to the HBS you frequent? Is it location? The only one around? Selection, quality? Would you travel farther if you liked the store better? What is it that keep you coming back again and again? I want to do all I can to make the first time you stop in, the best experience. I personally frequent one that is 40 minutes away. There are others, but farther away. The store is OK, but is small and a little disheveled due to no place for extra inventory. I see a lot that I can improve on. But who is better to ask than a potential client?

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Equipment and Software / Re: Carbonating with Diffusion Stone
« on: July 30, 2013, 07:26:04 AM »
This sounds like a great process. Beer "Faster" is a good thing! However, never working with a diffusion stone, I don't quite understand the entire process. Is the CO2 escaping or cycling somehow? I understand the point of the diffusion stone, but once the keg reaches the pressure its regulated for, the CO2 stops entering the keg. Is that the point of starting at a lower PSI? To expose the diffused CO2 in stages?

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All Grain Brewing / Razen Bitter
« on: June 29, 2013, 03:34:41 PM »
Made a Summer ale and added 5 lb. of raspberry's to the secondary. After a week at 67 degrees in the secondary, I rack to a third carboy. Tasted the result and it is quite nice with a beautiful raspberry flavor up front. The summer ale blends in the middle. However, there is bitterness (I assume from the seeds) that finishes it off. Not really what I want. Is there a way to reduce the bitterness or sweeten it up to mask as it conditions. This is my first try at a fruit ale. Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Going Pro / Re: Home Brew Supply Startup
« on: June 27, 2013, 01:01:25 PM »
Thanks for all the input. My vision is: Home Brew Supplies including DME/Grain kits and All grain kits. Wine and cheese making supplies and lessons for beginners in all three disciplines. Growler bar with 10 to 20 local-ish brands on tap and craft beer in bottles from all over. In the right spot I believe it will be a hit.

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Going Pro / Home Brew Supply Startup
« on: June 24, 2013, 11:17:15 AM »
After home brewing for a couple of years, I thought about starting my own 7bbl micro. Then, after a few months of researching, I found that with no real experience in the brewing industry, it was going to be way harder than I thought. In essence, due to my age and lack of education and experience in some related field, I would be hiring out ALL of the needed positions of the business to others to run. What would I be for other than the financing?

So, wanting to do something in the Home Brew industry, I think I want to open a Home Brew Supply and help others in my community to experience the joy and satisfaction of a brew made by there own hands. Possibly supplies for wine and cheese making as well.

I have done a lot of research and demographics in my area and found that it should be a good one. Only one other supplier within a 40 mile radius.

The point of the post is to get ideas on how to best put together a strong inventory. Location, building,  suppliers, POS system, marketing can all be handled with normal business strategies. However, putting together the inventory list seems to elude me.

Do offer to pay another HBS shop for access to their inventory? Or do I piece part it together?


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Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottles Bursting with Flavor
« on: June 04, 2013, 07:32:34 AM »
Thanks for all the replies. To answer some questions, the beer tastes fine. I drank some this weekend. The bottles in question have a definite sign of over carbonation. The caps are domed up. I promptly put them in the fridge to stave off further beer room blasts. I’m leaning toward too much sugar. However, I will keep all the other possibilities in mind. The packs are pre-measured but seem larger than they should be. I will put one on a scale tonight and see.

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Kegging and Bottling / Bottles Bursting with Flavor
« on: May 15, 2013, 04:30:18 PM »
I recently grabbed a case of bottled brew that had been sitting in my brew room for 4 to 6 months to give to a friend. I gave him the older brew to clean up some that wasn’t being drunk in a timely manner. I knew some of the styles were highly carbonated from sitting so long. Initially they were fine after the normal carbonating period. However, the longer they sit the more carbonated they get. Apparently, I make more than I can drink. On his way home he had a couple of them burst on him. The bottle. Not just the cap. I suppose the extra joggling around didn't help. I have been adjusting the amount of sugar that I use in the bottling process, but I'm not sure that is the correct angle of attack. I need them to carbonate, but not morph into bottle bombs. Any other ideas?

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