Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - trivittbrew

Pages: [1]
1
Hi All,

I recently purchased a Johnson Controls A419 Temperature Control with a seven cubic foot GE chest freezer to do lagers as well as ales that tend to be more sensitive to temperature variations. Anyway, I have noticed that whenever I have the "Set Point" temperature in the 60s, the freezer kicks on as it should, cools down to roughly two degrees lower than the set point as it should and then shuts off, but according to the temperature reading, the temp continues to drop, usually until it's down to about eight or nine degrees below the set point temp. According to Johnson Controls, this is a result of the chest freezer's short burst of cold, as chest freezers are primarily designed to operate at temps much colder and therefore they cool too quickly. Is this normal? Also, if I'm doing an ale such as a German Weiss, which typically ferments best around 67 or so, should I be worried the yeast will go dormant if the actual air temp within the chest freezer drops to around 55 throughout the day before it begins to slowly raise back up to the set point mid 60s range? I would think it would take longer for the wort to be impacted, or should I set the set point to a higher range to compensate for what I described above?

 

2
Beer Recipes / Revised "Lanwmower" Austin Summer Session Ale
« on: April 04, 2012, 09:44:43 PM »
As it's getting very warm here in Austin, TX, as I was seriously considering brewing an 5.75 gallon batch of a good, light ale to drink after I'm done mowing the lawn and just something to be a interesting thirst quencher. The recipe I came up with below, is basically a lightened pre-prohibition style lager fermented with White Labs San Francisco Lager yeast at ale temperatures.

4.0 LB German Pils
3.25 LB of American six-row
2.0 LB of flaked maize (corn)

1.25 oz Saaz@75 min.
1.0oz Saaz@20 min.
1oz Saaz@1min.

Estimated OG 1.044
Estimated FG 1.012
SRM 2.9
ABV: 4.1%
IBU:25
BU:GU:.573

single infusion at 151F for about 90 minutes
WLP810 (San Francisco Lager) at roughly 68F for two weeks, then cold crash for another five days prior to kegging

My goal is a light, easy drinking ale with a bit of character but at the same time very clean and sessionable. I am wondering if I should use WLP0001 yeast instead, or stick with the WLP810 for a more lager like fermentation, even though I plan to ferment at 68 degrees.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: All grain lawnmower ale
« on: April 04, 2012, 03:10:40 PM »
Thanks all for your suggestions. Based on what I have seen below and some of my own gut feel, instead of using all six row malt, I am going to use 3.5 LBS of six row and three LBS of German pils malt, as well as the two pounds of flaked maize. I am also thinking I am going to bump the IBU up from the mid teens to the low 20 range. Basically, I am looking at to brew a lighter pre-prohibition style lager, as the BU:GU ratio for this recipe should put me in that range.

4
Beer Recipes / All grain lawnmower ale
« on: April 04, 2012, 09:35:48 AM »
As it's getting very warm here in Austin, TX, as I was seriously considering brewing an 5 gallon batch of a good, light ale to drink after I'm done mowing the lawn and just something to be a interesting thirst quencher. The recipe I came up with below, is basically a lightened pre-prohibition style lager fermented with White Labs San Francisco Lager yeast at ale temperatures.

6.5 LB of American six-row
2.0 LB of flaked maize (corn)

1 oz Saaz@60 min.
.50oz Saaz@15 min.
.25oz Saaz@1min.

Estimated OG 1.044
Estimated FG 1.014
SRM 2
ABV: 4.0%
IBU:16
BU:GU:.36

single infusion at 149F for about 90 minutes
WLP810 (San Francisco Lager) at roughly 68F for one week, transfer to secondary for another one week, then cold crash for another five days prior to kegging

There isn't a style of beer on the planet I don't like, but that being said, I am a big pale ale and blonde ale fan, as well as a big fan of an easy going, well crafted lager. Don't get me wrong, I love my IPAs, but my goal with this beer is to have something that can be quaffed but at the same time is more interesting than a macro lager. I guess you could call it a craft lawnmower ale? Anyway, is this going to be too mild?
 

5
All Grain Brewing / Problems with Single Decoction mash
« on: March 25, 2012, 10:39:22 PM »
I tried for a second time brewing an authentic hefe utilizing a single decoction mash. I am consistently a 75-80% efficiency brewer whenever utilizing a single infusion (I use Beer Smith to design recipes and make calculations). Anyway, this past Saturday, I tried pulling a much thicker part of the mash, but unfortunately ended up scorching part of the grains during the grain boil and I had the problem I had the first time, which was a much lower efficiency than what I should have gotten. According to Beer Smith, I am only in the low 60s for overall efficiency percentage.

I have always thought decoction was supposed to yield better efficiency, but I am having the consistent problem of low efficiency and whenever I add the deocoted part back, not hitting my target scarification temp.

I heat the strike water up to 137 to do a 130 protein rest, which holds fine. Then, I pull about 5.3 quarts of the thickest part of the mash for the decoction (again, I use Beer Smith). Before boiling the decoction, I always rest for about 15 minutes at 158 or so. Then, which I add it back, I am lucky to be in the low 140s, which is about 10 degrees short of what I am aiming for. Even when I pull more to boil, I still come up short on efficiency.

So, three questions---
-is my batch of hefe ruined since I scorched some grains?
-any clues as to what is causing my decoction efficiency issues?
-is a decoction even necessary to get the malty mouthfeel in a hefe?

Pages: [1]