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Messages - reverseapachemaster

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast Discontinuing Some Strains
« on: February 21, 2017, 10:48:50 AM »
With greater competition from newer labs and evolving popularity in styles I'm surprised this didn't happen sooner. It makes a lot of sense from a business perspective.

I wonder how many of the strains remaining available throughout the year that aren't popular among homebrewers are those WY propagates enough for commercial sales that maintaining homebrewing inventory comes with marginal costs.

2
Ingredients / Re: Brewing Additions/ Adjuncts
« on: February 21, 2017, 10:37:09 AM »
The reason you see so many options is because there's isn't one right answer. Coffee is a really good example. There are a lot of ways to add it to beer. They all work and will give different character. OTOH some potential additions have a more limited range of useful preparations or techniques.

This is one of those topics where explaining what you want from the adjunct in a question is likely to net the better answer than reading all possible options and picking out of the dark.

3
I know somebody who made the mistake of making a beer with 100% honey malt.

Hopefully you will have better luck.

4
I didn't mean to say the AHA couldn't.  I said the GC role in it would be limited to nil.

Given the express charge to GC members in the bylaws I find this both highly surprising and concerning.

5
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Homebrew Club Discussion Topics
« on: February 15, 2017, 08:50:00 AM »
I agree the skill level of brewers will make a big difference in the topics you discuss. With a new club you might want to keep the first few meetings light on substance to get to know your potential members. I'd guess with college students most of the members will have minimal experience and probably a lot of extract brewing on basic systems but there are some young homebrewers who come out of homes where parents brewed and they already know a lot about the hobby.

6
I had considered the idea of collectibles. I'd rather see what I can do for now. Do you have a link to any information on the kegs?

Even searching for Heintz kegs doesn't yield much.

Unfortunately whatever you found on google is probably the extent of information available online. Your local coke bottler has probably been around long enough to have filled these at one time and is probably a better source of info. Maybe try reaching out to Coca-Cola directly. I don't know how they feel about homebrewers repurposing their old kegs but they do support people collecting their old merchandise and equipment.

7
Great, thanks! I'll let you know how it comes out in couple years!

That blend will hit a good point at twelve months without turbid mashing and about twenty months with a turbid mash. At two years it will get more barnyard-y; at three years more leathery.

8
These are Heintz kegs. Heintz was a division of Kelsey-Hayes (which now mostly only makes car parts). These kegs were built for Coca-Cola's premix systems in the 1950s-1960s and seem to run as a small as 1-2 gallons up to five gallons. They seem to have fallen out of favor in the late 1960s or early 1970s in favor of the more popular pin lock style. Bottlers could have continued to fill them with premix because they likely would have still had the equipment to open and clean them (not that it requires anything fancy).

Coca-Cola bottlers would be your best bet to find parts. Few seem to exist in the wild and probably command collectible pricing. You might be better off selling them to a Coca-Cola collector than trying to refurb them for homebrew.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long does it take you to brew a beer?
« on: February 13, 2017, 03:58:31 PM »
I had to really think about this because I brew mostly small batches but lots of complicated mash schedules. A single infusion on a 1-2 gallon scale can be done under four hours. An average brew day is closer to five hours. If turbid mashing it feels like days.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Jester King's spontaneous fermentation
« on: February 13, 2017, 11:56:40 AM »
I've seen Jester King give a lot of different explanations for their mixed culture that contradict. The only info I've seen repeated with any consistency came from their former head brewer who claimed to have put together the culture. I assume he would know best what is in it.

Their early saisons were just 3711. Their early sour beers were isolated lacto and brett from wort they left out at the brewery. Over time the 3711 culture became infected. Eventually they decided to steer into the skid and added their local lacto/brett to the 3711 along with dregs from Fantome and Cantillon (possibly others as well). This became their house culture for everything that isn't coolshipped.

interesting. I've become skeptical at all the success every brewery seems to have with a coolship and spontaneously fermented beers. Open air cooling and fermenting in fresh barrel seems like it would have an enormous incident of failure, yet so many breweries are claiming to be having great success with it. I dunno, not calling anyone a Bull***t artist or anything, just seems like the rates of failure should be higher.

I should clarify that their SPON beers are coolshipped and do not receive any help from their house culture. I heard/read they dump 20-25% of their coolshipped barrels so there is definitely a degree of failure in the process. However, it's the way beers were cooled until the advent of refrigeration and the way more than just lambic has been inoculated throughout history. The problem is not reaching fermentation but getting a good flavor out of the process. Blending goes a long way to make that possible.

That said, how many breweries out there have active coolship programs going on? I know many coolships are being installed around the country but I'm not aware of that many that have successfully produced beer yet.

Their house culture has some local elements to it--both intentionally and unintentionally--but it's also "local" to Soy and Brussels, Belgium. I'm not hateful that their house culture includes commercial strains and dregs from other brewers. It's true of my house cultures as well. I dislike that they sometimes refer to it as locally sourced when that's not really the case.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Barrel Aging a Tripel- the memoirs
« on: February 13, 2017, 10:31:01 AM »
I prefer to save  bourbon barrels for more "bold" beers such as barley wines and imperial stouts and maybe quads. Personally I feel wine barrels work better for beers that are more "nuanced" such as tripel, saison, etc. But that is just my personal taste.

Agree entirely. I have had very few lighter beers aged in whiskey barrels that were better coming out of the barrel than going in. I'm a huge fan of red wine barrel aged pale beers especially.

I'll start poking at it and tasting at about the two week point.  I'm going to blend back with a fresh non-oaked batch of the same brew but I really don't have too much lee-way as I need to blend 50/50.  If it's over done then even a 50/50 blend may not bring it back in line to a Curieux'ish tribute.  I suppose I don't REALLY need to blend 50/50 but I'd like to fill two two cornies with the blend.  Pretty sure my barrel is 5 gallons as when I emptied the primary of the Tripel into the barrel it was right at the bung opening... takeaway there is that there's even more surface area!  Like I mentioned... I'll certainly be checking earlier than planned.  I better get that second blending batch brewed quick so it has time to get ready as my time line will likely change. 

I can appreciate the desire to target volume but you'll be happier with the end result if you blend to taste. Better to have eight or nine gallons you really love than ten gallons you like.

Also think about what you will do with the barrel after this first batch comes out. You don't want to leave the barrel sitting around empty because it will start to dry out and become an infection risk. You either want another beer ready to go in as the first comes out or be prepared to fill it with a holding solution that will keep it relatively sanitary inside.

12
I've used 3278 with great success. No starter, just smack the pack and pitch when inflated. You could add dregs of other sour beers if you wanted but 3278 will do just fine on its own.

Even if the sacc count is a little low it's doesn't matter as much here because the lacto in the blend is going to take off and start souring the beer ahead of sacc. Basically any off flavor from a weak/slow sacc fermentation will be cleaned up by brett (often beneficially to the end flavor profile) so it is a non-issue for you. Lacto will start to sour the beer immediately and protect it from most unwelcome guests and sacc will pitch in (pun not intended) ethanol to further protect from other unwanted participants.

13
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Jester King's spontaneous fermentation
« on: February 13, 2017, 10:10:45 AM »
I've seen Jester King give a lot of different explanations for their mixed culture that contradict. The only info I've seen repeated with any consistency came from their former head brewer who claimed to have put together the culture. I assume he would know best what is in it.

Their early saisons were just 3711. Their early sour beers were isolated lacto and brett from wort they left out at the brewery. Over time the 3711 culture became infected. Eventually they decided to steer into the skid and added their local lacto/brett to the 3711 along with dregs from Fantome and Cantillon (possibly others as well). This became their house culture for everything that isn't coolshipped.

14
Equipment and Software / Re: Used Barrels
« on: February 13, 2017, 09:56:54 AM »
A few whiskey distilleries sell 5-15 gallon barrels directly off their website (Woodinville, Corsair). Some of the homebrew shops sell whiskey barrels from distilleries including Balcones (TX), Ranger Creek (TX), Dad's Hat (PA). I believe Farmhouse Brewing Supply gets various other types of barrels and advertises them on HBT. A lot of craft distilleries with these smaller barrels will sell direct if you contact them.

Tequila barrels are going to be tough to find. Tequila is only made in Mexico and mostly in full size barrels. Tequila is usually aged in used bourbon/whiskey barrels so you could always pick up a whiskey barrel, run a beer through it, add some tequila to it and get pretty close to an actual tequila barrel.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2017 NHC Competition Chat
« on: February 10, 2017, 09:31:54 AM »
No competition brewing for me. Good luck to all our entrants this year.

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