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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Diacetyl Rest
« on: January 18, 2019, 04:41:35 PM »
Diacetyl is formed when the precursor is oxidized outside of the yeast cell. The Diacetyl is absorbed by the yeast. Warmer temps make that chemical reaction happen quicker. Source

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/seminar/avoiding-a-d-bomb-a-key-to-understanding-diacetyl/

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 13, 2019, 02:44:23 AM »
"Old Hollybush"  Strong Mild Ale

This was, after Bitter,  the 2nd style I ever tried to brew way back when.   But I didn't know it then.   In the 80s, when colored-up, watered-down,  mid-century Mild was nearly extinct,  beers like this (really just pre-1917 style Mild it turns out) were readily available, often parti-gyled with the weak stuff (though I didn't know it.)  Confusingly,  it was always called "Old Ale," even though "old" is literally the opposite of "mild," and these beers were never aged; apparently it just meant "old fashioned," which it was.  I enjoyed the "Old Ale" style and tried to emulate it,  but not understanding it, I never really succeeded.   Now with a better grasp of the history and relationships within the Mild family,  and lots of Ron Pattinson's work to draw on, I think I can get where I was going.   Today's version:

12.6° P

Ca 104 Mg 10 Na 41 SO4 227 Cl 52

78% Chevallier pale 4.9% Amber  4.9% C77 12.2% No. 2 Invert

37 IBU (calculated in wort) 67% Cluster and Willamette FWH 33% Golding 15 minutes

Color adjusted to 14°SRM with cold-steeped black malt

S-04

(My original name for my version of the style comes from a pub,  the Holly Bush in Hampstead, where I enjoyed "Old Ale" and Modern Jazz.   I still fancy the ale, the jazz not so much.)

The Holly Bush is one of my all time favorite British Pubs.

3
Boy, the Russians really are taking an interest in our elections... :-X
Good one! Removed.

4
Hey the closest place to me closed. Rent went up, and one the owners was in the Army Reserve and he got activated. They were handy for certain things.

I am happy with Adventures, but it is twice as far.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Overheated IPA?
« on: January 07, 2019, 05:28:45 PM »
Never give up on a beer, until you are convinced it isn't getting better.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Overheated IPA?
« on: January 07, 2019, 02:12:50 PM »
Yeast love those higher temperatures. You will not love the beer, in my opinion. At those temps there will be more esters, and worse Fusels.

Taste the beer when done. If you like it, ok, procede. If it is too esters and smells of alcohol and gives you a headache, it might need to kiss the drain.

You will like the temperature controller in future batches, as controlling the temp is one of the big knobs to turn on brewing.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: I Did a Kesselmaische Dunkel.
« on: January 04, 2019, 07:30:42 PM »
The grains were
10 lb Best Dark Munich
1 lb Avangard Pils
0.7 lb CaraMunich II
1.75 oz. Carafa II puverized and added at vorlauf

The strike was about 7 gallons, 144F rest.
I added 1 gallon, maybe a little more to the decoctions.

If you believe batch sparges work, this will too.

Efficiency be was not high, but this is almost no Sparge.



8
All Grain Brewing / I Did a Kesselmaische Dunkel.
« on: January 04, 2019, 02:50:49 PM »
Yesterday I did a Dunkel using the technique that was discussed here https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=32676.0

It went well, it does add some time to the day, The whole amount of the grist must be heated, which takes time. A 20 minute boil duration was used.

The liquid was pumped to a second vessel. About 1 gallon of strike water was added to the thick part (5 gallon batch), to make it easier to stir, and give the total wort needed for the boil kettle.

After the boil I was wondering how to best recombine the thick and thin parts. I just did it. The resultant temp was 158F. Applied a little heat to get to 160F for a rest, then more heat to 170F. Transferred the wort to the boil kettle.

I ended up with 5 gallons of wort at 1.053 OG when done, target was 1.052, so I was happy. The garage smelled nice, but I didn't taste the wort for some reason.

I will report back on the beer. There is some skepticism as to any perceived benefit in the finished beer

9
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: January 03, 2019, 02:09:37 PM »
When I lived in London, I recall there was a fairly complicated distribution system designed to maximize gravity flow.  Living near Hampstead, the highest elevation in Greater London, we reportedly got water by aqueduct from some 60 miles northwest in the Chiltern Hills,  which was fairly mineralized.   Water from the London Aquifer was, I think, distributed to areas where it could be fed by gravity.   And Thames water pumped uphill only where this was the only option.   Just my recollection, and this was 30 years  ago, but a reminder of the caveat that you never know just what a brewery's source water is just by its location on a map.  And "Thames" in the name of the utility designates service area more than guarantees the source.  Like "Thames Television."

I assume you enjoyed living near Hampstead. Wonderful area.

Fuller's brewery is right on the River, so it would get the water from the utilities upstream source, no?

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: January 03, 2019, 02:05:53 PM »


On the Fuller's tour the guide said they just add gypsum to the London water. Saw a stack of gypsum bags by the HLT.

Fullers is likely using River Thames water from the local supplier as opposed to the London Aquifer water which is better suited to Porter brewing. The Thames water has modest mineralization, so the inclusion of gypsum makes sense to me.

I agree. The water utility in London is called Thames Water. It comes from reservoirs west of London feed by the River Thames, up from the brackish tide Waters. If you fly into Heathrow from a Westerly approach you go over some of those reservoirs.

Here’s the 2017 utility report for another data point (they boil prior to building correct?): http://twmediadevcdn.azureedge.net/waterquality/WQ%20Report_Z0347_Chiswick%20&%20Hammersmith.pdf


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I don't know if they boil.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: January 03, 2019, 03:32:38 AM »


On the Fuller's tour the guide said they just add gypsum to the London water. Saw a stack of gypsum bags by the HLT.

Fullers is likely using River Thames water from the local supplier as opposed to the London Aquifer water which is better suited to Porter brewing. The Thames water has modest mineralization, so the inclusion of gypsum makes sense to me.

I agree. The water utility in London is called Thames Water. It comes from reservoirs west of London feed by the River Thames, up from the brackish tide Waters. If you fly into Heathrow from a Westerly approach you go over some of those reservoirs.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: January 02, 2019, 05:20:45 PM »
Just got around to reading these posts.  I use Challenger for bittering and EKG for flavor and aroma in my ESB's.

Grain bill is 75% Maris Otter, 10% 40L, and 5% each of Biscuit, Wheat, and Carapils.  Note that I am not trying to clone Fullers here. I like a bit more bready flavors in my ESB and usually bitter it a bit higher in the 40 IBU range for competitions since the beer tends to mellow out balance-wise in about a month or so.  It seems to score well in competitions.  It is also a favorite of my wife who threatened me with bodily harm if I changed the recipe!

Agree with Jeff that water is important.  Although I do not Burtonize my water (I think it makes the beer a bit harsh) it still has a significant level of sulfate in it to enhance the bitterness.

Just another view on this topic.
Challenger is a fine British hop.

On the Fuller's tour the guide said they just add gypsum to the London water. Saw a stack of gypsum bags by the HLT.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry hopping with hop hash
« on: January 02, 2019, 03:23:54 PM »
I think I've only used hop hash once and I used it in the boil if I recall.  It was a free conference giveaway, so I think I had a quarter ounce or something like that and with the high alpha I used it as a bittering charge. 

I've been using pelletized cryo hops in my last couple beers and I haven't had any issues either in the boil or with dryhopping, but I believe that's a different process? The cryo hops cost twice as much, but I use half as much, so it all comes out in the wash.

The process is different.

14
Admins please delete the next to last message in this topic.
I slept in this morning. Done.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 01, 2019, 04:31:10 AM »
What did you smoke them with? And what kind of malt did you smoke? We need details (wo)man!

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

Avangard Pils malt was cold smoked with Beechwood. Will use some Munich, caramunich, and then midnight wheat for color.
Nice.
The Avangard was what I had. I recently got a bag of Weyermann Barke Pils. Damn that stuff smells great.

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