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Messages - hopfenundmalz

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1
First O-fest I've tried this year, and, sad to say, it won't be my favorite one of the year.  It checks all the boxes.  There's really nothing wrong.  But that's it, like if Watson the computer wrote the perfect Mozart sonata.  Then again, it is a recipe from a brewing school.  Will still please a lot of people, "beer for drinking, not for thinking." 

(I rarely do get thrilled by SN's O-fests, but really liked last year's.  Anyone recall who the collaborator was?)

Miltenburger is know as Faust in Germany. That didn't appear on the label as ABInbev owns the beer trademark for Faust in the USA. AB used to make a beer labeled as Faust, and has kept that active. Beer trivia.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Gelatinize ceral grains
« on: August 19, 2018, 08:12:18 PM »
If you add a little barley malt to the adjunct, it helps keep it from getting so ooey and gooey.  I forget why.  When doing a cereal decoction with corn for a CAP, I add 20% of the barley malt to the corn.
Conventional cereal mashes use 10% of the malt.  The books all say it's the alpha amylase, referred to as the "enzyme of liquefaction" in this context, and it supposedly remains active in this function right through boiling.
A rest at 158-160 F is required. Usually do a Cereal Mash every year.

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saxony, not Bavaria
« on: August 19, 2018, 01:48:17 PM »
34/70 refers to strain/station 34, isolate 70. There is also a 34/78 from the Weihenstephaner Hefebank, that I a less flocculant isolate. On my phone, you can look for the Hefebank, or some discussions from a couple years back here.

Good translation.

4
The Pub / Re: Fire at Weyermann malting facility
« on: August 11, 2018, 10:16:17 PM »
I was spending some time in Bamberg that night. Not big news the next day.

They have had fires before.

Weyermann has another facility that produces light colored malts (Pils, wheat). Bamberg does the specialty malts.

5
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: New Brewer, need troubleshooting
« on: August 06, 2018, 06:51:56 PM »
A week or more will allow the yeast to clean up Diacetyl, Acetaldehyde, and other off flavors from fermentaion. Be patient.

6
Mr. Google says AL foil is sterile off of the roll.

Think of all the food that is wrapped with AL foil with no issues.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Think I'm going back to whole cone
« on: August 04, 2018, 01:21:36 AM »


I thought I knew all the Wyeast strains, but Greenbelt is a new one on me.
Wyeast exclusive with Austin Homebrew Supply, circa 2010, not sure if it is still made. Don’t see it on either site.

Darn you're smart!

I used to be.  ;)

Something’s stick in my memory, and the google helps.
[/quote]

A magician is not supposed to reveal how the trick works.  ;)
[/quote]
Watch the hands, not the cards if you want to se the trick. Early 2017 we stopped at LV on our way to Death Valley NP. We saw Penn and Teller the first night out west. They said they did tricks, not magic, try and find the tricks. I may have caught about half of one tick. Damn those guys are good!

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Think I'm going back to whole cone
« on: August 03, 2018, 05:08:44 PM »


I thought I knew all the Wyeast strains, but Greenbelt is a new one on me.
Wyeast exclusive with Austin Homebrew Supply, circa 2010, not sure if it is still made. Don’t see it on either site.
[/quote]

Darn you're smart!
[/quote]

I used to be.  ;)

Something’s stick in my memory, and the google helps.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Think I'm going back to whole cone
« on: August 03, 2018, 04:20:01 PM »
My bittering has moved solely to high alpha ( magnum to be exact, I am RHG compliant afterall :) ) co2 extract.

We used whole cone Magnum for bittering quite a bit in 2012, but everything we made tasted like citrus, so we went to Warrior for bittering, and the citrus flavor went away. About that same time we switched from Wyeast Greenbelt to WLP-001 yeast, and later I realized that the citrus flavor was more likely due to the Greenbelt yeast than the Magnum hops.

Charlie

I thought I knew all the Wyeast strains, but Greenbelt is a new one on me.
Wyeast exclusive with Austin Homebrew Supply, circa 2010, not sure if it is still made. Don’t see it on either site.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flying with capped bottles
« on: August 02, 2018, 12:32:54 PM »
Keep in mind that the cargo hold is pressurized.  There's no reason they should leak.

They are usually pressurized to the equivalent of about 8000 feet altitude, as I understand it. That is perhaps a bit uncomfortable for some people but should be OK for capped bottles, bags of snack food packed at sea level, bottles of shampoo, etc. I usually bag or double-bag all liquid containers in zip-top bags just in case. I arrived in France once with a suitcase filled with clothes soaked in shampoo. Not fun.
The cabin and cargo area are at the same pressure. The pressure is usually equivalent to 6000 to 8000 ft elevation, depending on the airplane.

11
One of the several things I learned from the "Whirlpool Techniques" session that I introduced at HomebrewCon 2018, was that you have no chance of infection when the wort temperature is above 140F and falling. Therefore, its only the late stage of your chilling that you need to maybe worry.

By the way, you should check out this session since it did have some interesting info.

A small German brewery we toured uses a cool ship (Kühlschiff). Among the reasons were volatiles out gassing, letting true settle, and of course cooling. He said he would run the wort though the chiller when it got down close to 60C, which is 140F.

12
Homebrew Con 2018 / Re: AHA HOMEBREW CON SESSION VIDEOS
« on: August 01, 2018, 12:12:11 PM »
Hi all - we'll have about 2-3 weeks of post-event processing for those videos. I don't have a status update as of yet, but they will hopefully be up soon! Thanks!

Are these up yet? If so, where do I find them? This was my first time at Homebrew Con and my first year of membership of the AHA - so no idea where I am supposed to look!

Thanks,
Jerry

I expect the, to show up here soon.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/seminars/

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Think I'm going back to whole cone
« on: July 31, 2018, 01:45:15 PM »
I use whole cone mostly with some pellets. My BK is a keggle with a false bottom that covers the width of the bottom of the keg. I buy pounds of whole and smaller amounts of pellets. The filter bed of whole hops works well at collecting break and also does pretty good at filtering and holding sludge from pellets added later in the boil. I brew mainly American and English styles. For  the hop forward styles at KO I cool to 170 F add hops and recirculate with a pump for about 30 mins. The wort cools to about 150 F  after this time. When I pump it to the fermenter it is clear and free of the color green.  The beers smell and taste great. I must say I was not a hophead a few years ago but I do enjoy  more bitter and hoppy beers now. To those who say you can't use whole hops with a pump, yes you can if you use a large false bottom.

My set up is similar, and whole cone hops work great, just like you say.

14
Mechanical refrigeration actually began in the 18th century,  but was fully developed in its modern form in the 19th century by Carl von Linde, specifically for the brewing industry.  Bilsch is right.  Brewers always had temperature control.  Deep cellars, tons of ice, and failing that, prohibitions against brewing when temperature could not be held low enough by these means.  So brewing was historically a limited, seasonal activity, and mechanical refrigeration simply allowed us to brew year round. Thus temperature control has always been paramount in brewing. And if you are enjoying air conditioning or fresh food from your fridge, thank a brewer.
Hey, I was going to bring up Carl von Linde. The first commercial application of mechanical refrigeration was at the Spaten Brewery in 1873.

Block ice was cut from lakes and rivers to store and lager beer before refrigeration. The brewing museum in Bamberg is in an old brewery. There is a large room in the cellar that was lined with ice to keep the beer cold.

I have been in one cellar in Bavaria that is naturally at 3 to 3.5 C year round, not bad for lagering temps.

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Back from a close call
« on: July 28, 2018, 01:03:32 AM »
I saw the yeast genome project post, and there are a lot of questions in my mind.  I previously posted a link to the Dunn and Sherlock publication in which the Ballantine culture BRY-96 (a.k.a. Chico) was shown to be a diploid yeast strain having many of the genetic markers of the saccharomyces cerevisiae parent of saccharomyces pastorianus (https://genome.cshlp.org/content/early/2008/09/11/gr.076075.108.full.pdf).  Diploid brewing strains are unique because most brewing strains a polyploids with three (triploid) or four (tetraploid) sets of chromosomes.  The beauty of a diploid strain is that it can undergo sexual reproduction (meiosis) in addition to asexual reproduction (mitosis).  Brewing cultures are produced via mitosis. New yeast strains are produced via meiosis.

There was a session in Portland you will love when it gets posted on the AHA site. A Prof at U of WA tracked genetic changes through sreial repitches at Post Doc Brewing  (Dr. Tom Schmidlen used to be on here before he went pro). I think you will enjoy it, as it was one of the Chico strains IIRC.

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