Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - hopfenundmalz

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 610
1
Hop Growing / Re: Hop rhyzomes
« on: April 19, 2019, 10:34:46 PM »
Lost my cascade plant during a deck renovation. Recently ordered a “third year” hop rhizome that is very large with a huge root system. Is there any benefit to that or did I just pay double for no reason?

You will get more hops earlier. The ball will have some root shock being transplanted, but you will probably get a good yield the first year.

2
Going Pro / Re: Who do I sell to?
« on: April 18, 2019, 03:36:19 PM »
IIRC, meadmakers have the "choice" of being regulated either as wineries or breweries at the federal level depending on the alcohol content of the mead.  You can be one, but not the other without getting an extra permit and probably jumping through a lot of hoops.  This might have changed but I doubt it.  Typically the choice you make at the federal level applies to the state level, but since you're in Utah who knows. 

I would start by looking for guidance at the TTB for mead to figure out if you are selling "beer" or "wine."

I think your referring to how they are taxed. There is s provision that low ABV meads (6% ?) That are carbonated are taxed as beer at a lower rate. Mead makers can't have grain on premise. This are things I remember talking to Ken Schramm over the years.

Some med makers also hold a brewing livense so they can make Braggot.

3
Pimp My System / Re: Stainless Counterflow Chiller
« on: April 18, 2019, 04:08:17 AM »
Nice!

4
Born on 4/20.  ;D

Have a great birthday brewing, young man!

5
The AHA is required to cover its costs.  Sharing office space with the BA helps, but that's about it.

FWIW, the AHA outgrew their offices in the BA building and moved a few blocks down the street.

I don't think you can make a blanket statement like that.  Do you have an example in mind?

It's certainly debatable, but here in Colorado we recently legalized full-strength beer sales in grocery stores, gas stations, etc. after years of opposition by lobbying groups including the BA. If you're willing to make the assumption that AHA members' views were aligned with the general public, then the BA and AHA were in conflict on the bill.

I'd totally forgotten about the move.  As to the law, I have no idea....
IIRC, the BA needed more room.

Maybe the AHA got better parking out of the deal? Parking at the  BA offices was, well, interesting.

6
Those are state laws.  Nothing the AHA/BA can do about them.

I disagree. The AHA and BA are lobbying groups. An example provided in this thread just a few posts ago:

When I lived in Mississippi Gary Glass made multiple trips to help lobby for homebrewing rights. We got them. I think he helped Alabama a lot too.

There is A LOT they can do to help advise and support the local members to get laws changed.

From the AHA site: “The American Homebrewers Association (AHA) focuses on a variety of government affairs-related activities on behalf of America’s homebrewing community. The AHA works on issues that directly affect homebrewers, such as transportation of homebrew to competitions, and events and laws relating to serving homebrew at organized events.”



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It takes the work of local citizens to get those laws changed. The AHA acts as a support group for that.

Denny worked on getting a law changed in Oregon. There is a picture of him and others at the signing, somewhere on the internet.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Thin vs. Thick Mash
« on: April 14, 2019, 02:31:49 PM »
I usually use around 2 qts/lb. German Brewers use 2.5-3.0 qts/lb.

Brewin a bag? Some use all of the water for the batch in the mash. I don't brew with a BIAB set up, so someone can say what they do.

8
There are more AHA members than breweries that are BA members. The AHA's dues are much less than dues for the BA. The BA's staff is much bigger.

https://www.brewersassociation.org/membership/membership-types/brewery/

https://www.brewersassociation.org/brewers-association/staff/

If you have been to a Conference, you will notice the BA events staff that does much of the behind the scenes work.

The BA does view homebrewers as the future members of the BA as they turn pro.

9
Ingredients / Re: Pasteurized vs: raw Honey
« on: April 13, 2019, 11:12:50 PM »
Manduku honey is the new wonder food from NZ. It gets a lot of Buzz on some sites (pun intended). $22 for 8.8 oz at Costco. Pretty spendy in my book.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Homebrew Con 2019
« on: April 13, 2019, 11:06:43 PM »
Kiki D,

Hope to see you there and I'm sure you will enjoy the experience.  No matter if you are into brewing or just like craft beer you are sure to have a great time, and thats before you even consider meeting a great bunch of folk.

love

g

Thanks! I'll be the crazy woman running around asking far too many questions!

I'm a beginner brewer- I have 3 batches (independently) under my belt, and have assisted my fiance' loads of times. He is a terrific brewer.

I'm wicked excited to expand my skillset and learn more at the Con. Since we are going with my fiance's brew club, I have been challenged by him to brew a new recipe to keg & bring. 

I also work with seniors, and will be brewing a kit with them this summer for our Oktoberfest party.

+1 for working and brewing with the Seniors. Hey, I'm technically in that group now.

If you see any of the Forum people around, say hi. Everyone at the conference will talk about beer and brewing.

11


Bamforth... has a gig with Sierra Nevada now.

I did not know that.   I guess this means that ABI no longer had any place for technical expertise or quality control?    ;)

He sat the AB endowed chair at UC Davis. AB has contributed money and equipment for that position. He was not tied to them as far as research or consulting.

He did retire from UC Davis last year, and the position at Sierra Nevada is as a consultant.

12
I hear you, but I don't necessarily agree.  I really don't have much care about what commercial breweries are doing.  I'm a homebrewer and intend to stay that way.  But from my perspective, the AHA only gives the members what the majority wants.  One of my goals on the GC is to try to keep the focus on homebrew.  Personally, I'm not real happy about the fact that the keynote speaker at every conference is a commercial brewer.  We have lots of great homebrewers with experience and perspective to share.  But that's not what a majority of homebrewers want.  MANY homebrewers harbor dreams of going commercial...more than I ever would have guessed.  We can't ignore that.

I can assure you that the AHA remains a strong advocate of homebrewing and the fact that they feature a lot of commercial brewing doesn't diminish that fact.  I have my own issues with the "Best Beers" thing, but again, I'm not the majority.

Let me turn this around to see of we can get some ideas...what would you like the AHA to be doing in regard to homebrewing that it isn't doing?  Is there something missing?  If so, let us know and we'll try to find a solution.  If you simply object to the coverage of commercial brewing, you can do what I do....ignore it.
You're slipping Denny. ;-)


How could you forget Charles Finkel in Seattle, an importer. I thought it was pretty forgettable.You're excused on that one.

Last year was some guy who is not a professional Brewer, but beer is his life.
https://www.homebrewcon.org/news/2018-keynote-charlie-papazian/


Edit - this is not trying to be too serious, but just point out two who were not pro Brewers.This year we get another ProBrewer.

Maybe we can get Bamforth when we're are on the Western part of the US in a couple of years?

Yes, they're not commercial brewers, but other than Charlie they're not homebrewers, either.  Sure, Finkel is interesting but it's still from a commercial perective.  When you think about how many keynotes there have been,it seems like at least a few more could have a homebrewers point of view.

Bamforth would be good as he is entertaining, has the technical background, and did work for Bass.  He has a gig with Sierra Nevada now.




13
I hear you, but I don't necessarily agree.  I really don't have much care about what commercial breweries are doing.  I'm a homebrewer and intend to stay that way.  But from my perspective, the AHA only gives the members what the majority wants.  One of my goals on the GC is to try to keep the focus on homebrew.  Personally, I'm not real happy about the fact that the keynote speaker at every conference is a commercial brewer.  We have lots of great homebrewers with experience and perspective to share.  But that's not what a majority of homebrewers want.  MANY homebrewers harbor dreams of going commercial...more than I ever would have guessed.  We can't ignore that.

I can assure you that the AHA remains a strong advocate of homebrewing and the fact that they feature a lot of commercial brewing doesn't diminish that fact.  I have my own issues with the "Best Beers" thing, but again, I'm not the majority.

Let me turn this around to see of we can get some ideas...what would you like the AHA to be doing in regard to homebrewing that it isn't doing?  Is there something missing?  If so, let us know and we'll try to find a solution.  If you simply object to the coverage of commercial brewing, you can do what I do....ignore it.
You're slipping Denny. ;-)


How could you forget Charles Finkel in Seattle, an importer. I thought it was pretty forgettable.You're excused on that one.

Last year was some guy who is not a professional Brewer, but beer is his life.
https://www.homebrewcon.org/news/2018-keynote-charlie-papazian/


Edit - this is not trying to be too serious, but just point out two who were not pro Brewers.This year we get another ProBrewer.

Maybe we can get Bamforth when we're are on the Western part of the US in a couple of years?

14
Neither of those Briess malts is under modified.  After all, their target customer is the craft and home brewer doing infusion mashes. The numbers don't tell everything it's true.  Modification during germination can continue well after measured S/T has reached a plateau and stops going up.  And 37 would be considered fully modified by traditional definition anyway.  If you want an under modified malt of the ole timey type, you'll have to get someone to custom make it for you.
I thought you would comment, so that explains my last line.

I recently used Weyermann Barke Pils, one of their lower S/T malts. It made one of the clearest Pilsners I've ever brewed.

15
Beer Travel / Re: Craft Beer in San Fransisco / Palo Alto
« on: April 12, 2019, 02:54:29 AM »
Hi, can anyone recommend a good craft beer bar in / around the San Fransisco / Palo Alto area?
My old time classic in the lower Haight is the Toronado. Cash only, know what you want when you walk up to order.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 610