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Messages - j.petykowski

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Hop Growing / Re: Hop trellis options and a few other questions
« on: March 06, 2013, 03:04:19 PM »


I'm located in the Chicago burbs too, so here's my experience with hops:

1. I've been very happy with the rhizomes I've purchased from Arrowhead Hops arrowheadhops.com. They're in Iowa, so the rhizomes you're getting are from plants that were grown in a climate more similar to Illinois. The rhizomes I've planted from them have done really well in the first year. I'm making an educated guess that it's because of the climate similarity. I've also purchased some from Hops Direct hopsdirect.com that have fared well.
2. Never tried plants, but hops are pretty hardy, so rhizomes have always been fine for me. I've only had one fail to grow out of probably about a dozen.
3. I'd say the second option is better. They want to grow up as much as possible, so let them.

A final bit of advice... Have a plan to combat Japanese beetles. They seem to have a preference for certain varieties (Willamette and Centennial in my garden). They only want to eat the leaves, but I'm sure it slows the plants' growth down. I just spray with water daily to knock them off.

Not sure where in the burbs you're located, but if you need any rhizomes, I can cut plenty off my plants and give them to you. My Goldings and Willamette have huge root systems, so I could cut lots from those. My Chinook may be ready for some cutting too. PM me if you're interested.

Thanks for the reminder, I lived in Iowa last year and remember asking around out of curiosity and heard that same name. And as for the Willamette rhizome, I might have to take you up on that offer, I will let you know when it gets a little closer to spring.

And thank you everyone else for the advice, learning new stuff everyday. Now I am really looking forward to this summer, regardless of hop growage.

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Hop Growing / Re: Hop trellis options and a few other questions
« on: March 05, 2013, 07:39:48 PM »
Unfortuntely, I don't think that you'll be able to get your hands on any Amarillo. It is a proprietary hops. Others would be Simcoe and Citra. There are a handful that aren't available to the public. Somebody please correct me if I'm wrong, and then tell me where to purchase rhyzomes for these beauties  8). I did pre-order rooted hops rhyzomes from the Thyme Garden way back in October. They should be shipped within the next couple of weeks. They seem like they would be a solid option and had great customer service when I was seeking information. I ordered 6 or 8 centennial rhyzomes last year from Midwest Supplies and only had two grow. The two grew nicely and one yeilded an ounce or two of hops. Not much to brew with, but they garnished beers nicely lol. But here is the link to the Thyme Garden....

http://www.thymegarden.com/site/561124/search/site?keys=hops

This is news to me, I am pretty new to this whole ordeal. So, thanks for the info on the proprietary hops, I probably should have looked for those specific types of hops before I posted. Probably would have come across it at some point. I will check out this website, thanks a bunch for the link.

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Hop Growing / Hop trellis options and a few other questions
« on: March 05, 2013, 06:05:44 PM »
So this Spring is coming up quite quickly, and I have been rummaging the internet for places to order plants or rhizomes for a hop trellis, which is in the drawing stage as of now. I only plan on growing four types of hops, probably all around American; Amarillo, Cascade, Centennial, and Willamette. I have my reasons.. Well, anyway, I would like to know:

1. Where is a good website to purchase hops? (I purchased a Centennial plant from High Hops in Colorado last year, which grew beautifully by the way) which brings me to number 2..
2. Plant or rhizome? What have you had best luck with?
3. My yard sees plenty of sun, and living in suburban Chicago that's pretty lucky. Would it be best to do 8 feet up coir yarn, and then 8 feet horizontal with coir yarn to my garage, or just straight up pole with coir coming down from the "T"-eed top? I'm looking for ease of harvest over any reason, which makes me think option 2 might be tough.

Any insight on any of these question would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Jonathan

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How long is too long?
« on: December 23, 2012, 07:52:55 PM »
Yes, bottle it.  It shouldn't have spoiled, but some of the hop flavor and aroma may have diminished a little.  Let us know how it turned out.

Ended up dry hopping with 1 oz of pellets and bottled 4 days later. Drank the first bottle earlier this evening, turned out pretty good, thanks again for the excellent advice, all.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How long is too long?
« on: November 27, 2012, 01:04:18 PM »

I'm no expert on it (still a newbie myself, though I'll probably be claiming that title for a few years yet), but there's a discussion on it in this thread. Seems like a packet or even part of a packet of rehydrated dry yeast will do ya.
[/quote]

Perfect, thanks a bunch.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How long is too long?
« on: November 27, 2012, 12:57:20 PM »
You might need to add some more yeast if you're naturally carbing.
What type/how much yeast would you think to be necessary to add? Would I have to let it sit for longer?

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General Homebrew Discussion / How long is too long?
« on: November 27, 2012, 12:11:13 PM »
I brewed a 5 gallon batch of an Imperial Pale Ale about 13 weeks ago from a Brewers Best kit, my third batch ever. It said about 4 weeks is good in the carboy to ferment, but since the beginning of this semester, I've been unable to find the time to bottle it (Organic Chemistry...). Simple yes or no question really, is it still worth my while to go ahead and bottle it? Has it spoiled? Thanks all.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Just wondering
« on: August 25, 2012, 07:57:30 PM »
Alright,
So I decided to brew my second batch and had a few complications along the way.  I'm using a 8 gallon brew pot and filled it up to the 5 gallon mark(figuring after adding LME, hops, etc. a little would boil out, enough to come to 5 gallons in the end).  Well, my wort chiller connection broke and after I finally figure out that I only had about a pound of ice, I ran to the store to get some more. After an hour and a half of my beer sitting around (including time chilling in a sink of ice and water), there was about 4 1/2 gallons of the chilled wort, about 70 degrees F. I added a little bit of cold water, and I then proceeded to take the OG. 1.032. About .012 from what I was shooting for.
Just wondering if possibly, after adding the extra water to the wort in the fermentor, if the OG could be off because I pulled from the watered down wort? I'm going to try and ferment at around 68 degrees in a bin of water, that I will be doing the old "frozen water bottle switch-aroo."
Thanks, I would greatly appreciate advice on bettering my homebrewing.   

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 02:15:01 PM »
You can keep the next batch cooler by placing the carboy in a tub of water and swap out frozen water bottles to keep the brew cool. You'll probably have to do it twice a day at most.

Thank you I will give this a try, folks weren't on board with me turning the air conditioning all the way down.

If you have another fermenter (that isn't you're bottling bucket), get another batch going ASAP. You'll be amazed at how fast that first batch goes.  Congrats!

I'm sure it will. So for good measure, I ran to the local homebrew store this afternoon to grab myself another carboy, thanks!

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 08:32:20 AM »
What temp did you ferment at?  My first brew I didn't pay too much attention to the temp and it got up to 80 degrees and fermented really fast.  Result was non too pleasant but a very good learning experience.  As long as your temps are good, I wouldn't worry too much about how fast your krausen rises and falls.

Well I would have to say it never got above 75 degrees, I have been checking every chance I can on it.

When you say 75 degrees, is that the reading on the thermometer strip (assuming this is what you are using)?

Yes, I moved it to a cooler spot in the basement just to be certain, I will see if it cools it anymore.

F or future reference, try to keep it around 65F.  You'll end up with better beer that way.  Using a secondary is kind of an outdated idea any more.  It's seldom really necessary.  As was said above, if you just leave it in the primary for 2-3 weeks you'll be fine.

Denny,
Thanks for the advice, I will give that a try for next time.

Baker,
Thanks also for your help, and I am excited for the coming months. I'm just about 22 years old and ready to start a lifelong (hopefully) hobby. Been intrigued since my first visit to New Glarus Brewery. Cheers

11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 07:56:26 AM »
What temp did you ferment at?  My first brew I didn't pay too much attention to the temp and it got up to 80 degrees and fermented really fast.  Result was non too pleasant but a very good learning experience.  As long as your temps are good, I wouldn't worry too much about how fast your krausen rises and falls.

Well I would have to say it never got above 75 degrees, I have been checking every chance I can on it.

When you say 75 degrees, is that the reading on the thermometer strip (assuming this is what you are using)?

Yes, I moved it to a cooler spot in the basement just to be certain, I will see if it cools it anymore.

12
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 07:40:42 AM »
What temp did you ferment at?  My first brew I didn't pay too much attention to the temp and it got up to 80 degrees and fermented really fast.  Result was non too pleasant but a very good learning experience.  As long as your temps are good, I wouldn't worry too much about how fast your krausen rises and falls.

Well I would have to say it never got above 75 degrees, I have been checking every chance I can on it.

13
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 07:20:19 AM »
The Krausen settles back in to the beer after a few days.  You are fine.  I would just leave it in primary for 2-3 weeks, then rack and bottle. 

Dave

Dave,
Thank you, I'm super pumped about my first homebrew.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / First timer here
« on: August 13, 2012, 07:09:29 AM »
I brewed my first from a kit, Brewers Best, and it's the English Brown Ale. Followed all directions and it is sitting in a glass carboy in my basement as I type. Although all the krauesen is gone, it looked very healthy for the first 48 and now it is all gone. Just wondering if that's okay, I'm about 60 hours into it, and also wondering would 72 hours be a good time to transfer into secondary? Thanks everybody, as I said I am new and just thought I'd ask.

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