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Messages - singletrack brewer

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 002
« on: March 05, 2014, 04:55:17 AM »
WLP002 is a beast, and as philm63 points out works fast and drops like a brick which is very normal for this yeast.

2
Going Pro / Re: Pros (or wannabes) - Propane or NG
« on: February 06, 2014, 05:40:25 AM »
Our 7 bbl system uses natural gas in the BK but our HLT is heated with an electric element.

3
Going Pro / Re: Keg Washer Setup
« on: January 30, 2014, 08:55:51 AM »
Thanks for the input, it's greatly appreciated.  How many brites are you running for carbing? We have four since we serve directly from them.

4
Going Pro / Re: Keg Washer Setup
« on: January 30, 2014, 07:18:12 AM »
Good hearing from everyone regarding this and thanks for the compressor suggestion Pawtucket Pat.  I talked with the owner last night and we are looking at the pros and cons of going straight CO2 versus adding an air compressor for purging the kegs to clean.  Using just CO2 would mean one less piece of equipment to obtain and set up.  However, we are looking what will be the most cost beneficial in the long run.  Sure we could spend X on the compressor and such for the utilities to run that, or we can go all CO2 and just have our tank refilled more often.  At some point the cost of one over the other will offset and we are trying to get info on that part of it to make the overall decision.  Anyone have any insight as to how much CO2 we might go through for each round of cleaning? Not looking for absolute numbers just ball park since it all depends on how many kegs and which size they are.  Again, thanks for the assistance here. 

5
Going Pro / Keg Washer Setup
« on: January 29, 2014, 05:39:08 AM »
Morning all in cybeerland, we just received our new keg washer from Premier Stainless (KGW-M-02 for those interested in which one) and am in the midst of getting the system up and running.  Looking over the service requirements there is one for an air compressor that can deliver 30-40 psi @ 7-15 SCFM and is oil free.  I poked around on the probrewer.com forums and I see that some are skipping the compressed air and are using their existing CO2 source to purge the kegs and are using Acid #6 or similar product for cleaning in a CO2 environment.  So what are my fellow brewers here using for their keg washing set ups, air compressors or straight CO2?  Thanks for the help with this.

6
Ingredients / Re: Needed... 16.5 Tons of Pilsner Malt
« on: January 09, 2014, 04:25:53 AM »
You might try contacting Brewers Supply Group or one of the other suppliers to see if they can assist.  Another option would be to reach out directly to one of the malting companies like Briess to see what they can do as well.

7
Going Pro / Re: Questions
« on: December 24, 2013, 03:09:51 PM »
The debate for long primaries over secondary have been going on for quite some time on other forums as well.  It's interesting to discuss and to share ideas and experiences with other brewers both fellow pro and fellow homebrewers (yes, I still brew at home too).  After all, isn't this how we all improve as brewers? 

8
Going Pro / Re: Questions
« on: December 24, 2013, 07:47:09 AM »
In our 7 BBl set up we have two fermenters and four brite/serving tanks. 

In terms of fermenter time, our batches take about the same amount of time in primary that yours do. I like for them to have 3 weeks in the fermenter at a minimum and I find that the beers greatly benefit from that. ...


What do you mean by this? Are they more clear? Less fermentation byproducts?

I ask because I think 3 weeks is quite a long time to sit in a fermenter at home, let alone in a production environment, unless you're lagering in a Uni.

It does seem like a long time but the beers benefit because it gives the yeast time to settle out properly and clean up fermentation byproducts.  Keep in mind that the three weeks includes fermentation, settling, trub dumping, yeast dumping/harvestiing, dry hopping and cold crashing prior to transfer.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Details on Tapping a Firkin
« on: December 24, 2013, 04:50:59 AM »
Glad everything went well and thanks for posting the video.

10
Going Pro / Re: Questions
« on: December 24, 2013, 04:49:08 AM »
In our 7 BBl set up we have two fermenters and four brite/serving tanks. 

In terms of fermenter time, our batches take about the same amount of time in primary that yours do.  I like for them to have 3 weeks in the fermenter at a minimum and I find that the beers greatly benefit from that.  Prior to me coming on the brewer would do ten days with one day of bulk maturation then knock out.  I talked with a friend that works at a much larger brewery and asked if the idea of letting the beer stay in the tank for 21 days minimum was a bad idea, mainly for a sanity check.  He filled me in on their times and said they used to go 28 days in the fermenter before transferring to the brites.  Now they are doing 21 days and haven't seen any difference in quality.  Good to know that I was on the right track there.

Brite tanks are where the brite, finished beer is stored and are used for a few reasons.  They are tanks where the beer is held after fermentation is complete.  Finings can be added during transfer, which is what we do, or the beer can be filtered on it's way to the tank.  The beer is carbonated in the tank and is allowed to rest for a few days.  From there the beer can be either kegged off or hooked up t o a tapping system to serve beer directly from the tank.

Hope this hepled answer your questions.  Hopefully others will post that may fill in some gaps I may have left, I blame the lack of coffee at the moment for that.  If you have any other questions just ask, I'm willing to help where I can. 

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Details on Tapping a Firkin
« on: December 19, 2013, 12:42:03 PM »
If your wood mallet has a good heft to it you could probably use that for tapping otherwise the deadblow would definitely work well. 

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Details on Tapping a Firkin
« on: December 19, 2013, 05:12:32 AM »
Tom, here is a link that has a little more info for you in terms of spiling and serving:
http://www.classiccitybrew.com/caskale.html

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Details on Tapping a Firkin
« on: December 18, 2013, 12:54:20 PM »
Cool, you can probably soft spile them once they are in place.  They will fob for a bit, just monitor them and keep wiping the spile off.  You don't have to wait for the fobbing to stop either, once it slows considerably you can proceed with the hard spile.  You'll know if you've done it correctly when you replace the soft spile, there will be a little puff when you remove it. 

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Details on Tapping a Firkin
« on: December 18, 2013, 12:39:55 PM »
It's best to spile the firkins prior to tapping to alleviate the pressure in the firkin preventing a foamy mess and wasted beer.  There are two methods I know of that are used.  One is to use a soft spile in the shive and replace it with the hard spile once it's done fobbing.  The other is to knock a hard spile in and let it rest for a few days to a week.  Obviously the soft spile method is faster.  Just remember to use a hard spile to pierce the shive before popping in the soft spile.  Hope this helps.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: Saison from homepage
« on: December 17, 2013, 04:46:19 AM »
I remember seeing recipes for candi syrup on Homebretalk.  Here are the links:

This one talks mainly about how to achieve the differenct colors:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/20-lb-sugar-jar-yeast-nutrient-114837/

Here is the one discussing making dark candi syrup:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/making-dark-candi-syrup-102471/

I remember there being another really good thread about this and I'll see if perhaps I can find that one too. Hope these help in the interim.

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