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Messages - bigmoneymark

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1
Equipment and Software / Re: anyone use a hop spider
« on: August 18, 2013, 11:47:48 PM »
LAWLS!  Yeah you're probably right.  Well the material should be the decider.. need to find out what it is..

2
Equipment and Software / Re: anyone use a hop spider
« on: August 18, 2013, 02:23:32 PM »
Hi all..

So I'm building a hop spider as per the byo.com kit.  Will be using my plate chiller for the first time next time and have waking nightmares about it clogging and making a mess.  Also picked up a bazooka screen at whole foods for $10 lol.

Anyway, my concern is the material used in the paint strainer bag.  Is this food safe?  I don't believe it is, but lots of people are using them.  Does this mean they actually are safe or just noone gives a f.

I'd much rather pay more for a safe bag, but they're handy..

Cheers,

-M

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: co2 regulator usage, blow by blow
« on: June 01, 2013, 05:58:40 PM »
Once I have vented out the air from a freshly filled keg, I set the pressure at serving pressure and leave it for a week. Normally that does the trick. If I'm in a hurry I bump the pressure to 15-20 and leave it 24 hrs then drop to serving.

This is the easy peasy house brew way for me but when you get into proper carb volumes per style it's another ball game out of my low tech home brew league

Thanks.. do you need to top up over the life of the beer or is good once set?  I have a sense that as you tap it, pressure will drop and the last drops will have less pressure in the keg to force it out.

What do you mean by carb volumes?

Cheers,

-Mark

4
Kegging and Bottling / Re: co2 regulator usage, blow by blow
« on: June 01, 2013, 05:22:32 PM »
Great info, thanks.

Quote
It takes roughly 7-10 days to carbonate the beer using only head pressure. A few seconds (or hours) won't matter.

This is very interesting.. are you saying that when co2 is applied for the first time it takes that long for all the beer to be carbonated?  Having only used it once or twice, I hooked it up, there was enough pressure to push the beer out, so I thought thats that.. and disconnected as I returned the 3gal keg to the fridge.

So best to connect the co2 and leave it attached/under pressure for at least a week to start?

Thanks!

5
Kegging and Bottling / Re: co2 regulator usage, blow by blow
« on: June 01, 2013, 04:51:11 PM »
Another question..

If you had the regulator valve (the one to the keg) open, and accidentally allowed pressure to rise up to say 40 psi or something, what is the effect on the beer?  Is the entire content now over pressurised?  What does this mean for the beer?

Thx..

-M

6
Kegging and Bottling / Re: co2 regulator usage, blow by blow
« on: June 01, 2013, 04:48:36 PM »
Can you post a pic or link to the regulator you have? I'm not sure if you mean it's a dual-body model or if you're talking about the high- and low-pressure gauges. At any rate, this is how to set a regulator:

Thanks for the info!  This is basically it, so dual body I suppose..
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Co2-Regulator-Dual-Gauge-Heavy-Duty-Pro-Series-Draft-Beer-Kegerator-Brew-/360548301462

When the shutoff is open and the keg is pressurized, should the gauge for the keg pressure stay at ~12 psi (or whatever it was set to)?  Can't remember but I believe this dropped off when I opened that valve.

Cheers,

-Mark

7
Kegging and Bottling / co2 regulator usage, blow by blow
« on: June 01, 2013, 03:17:35 PM »
Hi all,

Sorry if this is a duplicate, so many hits on 'regulator' out there.. if so pls point me to the right article..

I have a corny keg, co2 tank & dual head regulator, which I've used.. but am still not 100% on the operation.  I've seen conflicting articles on the net on what you should open/close when.  This can be dangerous so I want to be 100%.  So, can someone please comment & correct the following.

Assuming regulator is already attached to the tank, and tank valve closed:
Connect outlet hose to keg in.
Close the regulator's 'shutoff' valve (90 degrees out of phase with the hose to the keg)
Open the 'drum'/center valve completely in a anti-clockwise direction
Open the tank valve completely, this will register tank pressure on gauge 'A' (leftmost dial for me)
Clear gauge B by pulling the pressure release valve
Slowly close the drum valve until gauge 'B' registers ~12 psi
With outlet hose connected to keg, open the shutoff valve.

When done, close shutoff valve, tank valve, bleed pressure release valve, and disconnect from keg.

And thats it.  Is this the proper sequence?   


Couple of general questions while I'm here:
If the keg is unused for a while does it lose co2 pressure?
Is there any oxidation risk as co2 escapes (if possible) and is replaced by air?

Cheers!

8
Beer Recipes / Re: Pliny the Elder extract clone..
« on: January 24, 2013, 01:54:28 PM »
Vinnie wrote an article about Pliny for Zymurgy, in the July/August 2009 issue. It's available for download online here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/zymurgy/free-downloads. He includes a little bit about the origin and changes over the years.

Will take a look, appreciate the info!  What I have must be an older recipe.  It will be what it will be!

9
Beer Recipes / Re: Pliny the Elder extract clone..
« on: January 24, 2013, 01:52:45 PM »
Here's a link for instructions on posting a photo:
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=20.0

You do know that recipes are just guidelines, right?  You will probably get close to the flavors with any number of different ingredients.  Why not just chose a recipe, brew it, see how it comes out, then the next time tweak it towards your perceived preference.  Whether it comes out close to Pliny is irrelevant to the fact that you will be making your own very fresh double IPA.

Honestly no I didn't.  I would have thought for consistency, the same ingredients are used time and time again.  Seemed odd that the recipe would have changed so much... but obviously they do.. there you go.

This is what I wanted though - some reassurance that the fact that they're so different isn't an issue.

I'll try it and see :)

Thanks..

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Pliny the Elder extract clone..
« on: January 24, 2013, 09:09:03 AM »
Thanks all, have uploaded the orig recipe..

http://imgur.com/v959Xuf

-M

11
Beer Recipes / Pliny the Elder extract clone..
« on: January 23, 2013, 11:41:28 PM »
Hi all, first post..

First, I know there have been other posts regds PTE, but I didn't find my question.. sorry if it's a dupe.

As an xmas gift I got the ingredients for a PTE clone, all extract, woohoo!  The recipe it came with was a photocopy from a byo.com magazine article, said it was 'from Vinnie from Russian River', great! The ingredients I got didn't match up perfectly, but it was pretty close.   (thx for image help..)

http://imgur.com/v959Xuf

To clarify some stuff I searched around on the net and found _another_ recipe, on this site, for the same brew, with a very different recipe, which is also supposed to be from Vinnie from RR, now I'm confused.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=1900.0

If they were even close (to my untrained eye), that'd be one thing, but there are different hops (warrior), different times, all sorts of things.  Wondering if someone could opinionate on this - did I get the wrong recipe or has it just evolved?  And since I have what I have, can anyone see anything wrong/suggest any improvements to it?

Many thanks,

-Mark

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