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Messages - mrcceo

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mashtun's give me problems
« on: October 15, 2012, 12:59:51 PM »
Had the same problem with a cooler I recently fitted up.  The orange o-ring washers wouldn't seal.  Went to the big box store and found a 1/16" thick neoprene fender washer 1-1/2" in diameter.  Enlarged the hole to accommodate the nipple, placed one on the inside and one on the outside and it sealed like a charm.

2
Another option would be to use a solenoid valve attached to a digital timer that controls frequency and duration and adjust it based on how flocculent the yeast is.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Shift in thought regarding optimal mash pH
« on: August 10, 2012, 12:03:01 PM »
I know this information is specific to my probe but thought it might prove useful in regards to this thread.

"The GK733526B electrode is rated for use from 0 - 100 °C.  That does not mean is should be continuously used at that kind of elevated temperature, but if you are doing grab samples, it should not be a problem.

Accuracy should not be affected if you are using it at an elevated temperature, but you should be using a temperature sensor on your pH meter for accuracy at those temperatures, and yes, for most accuracy, you should also have your calibration standards at 68 °C when calibrating.

Also, do not expect to see the same pH readings at 68C as you do at 25C.  I am not sure how your sample will respond to that kind of temperature change, but as an example, the pH 4 calibration buffer that reads 4.005 at 25C will read 4.116 at 70C; the pH 7 buffer that reads 7.000 at 25C will read 6.982 at 70C.

If you have any other questions, please let me know.

Thank you.

Sincerely,
Tim Schmitt
Technical Support
Hach Company

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Sent her a short comment:
From the most interesting man in the world "Stay clueless my friend"

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Kettle v. Mash pH
« on: October 08, 2011, 07:54:52 AM »
 Just an observation: I find the spread will vary depending on the grain bill and the amount of water salt additions. Yesterday I brewed an Oatmeal Stout with a Dublin water profile which for me requires a generous amount of salts since I have low alkalinity water. When I checked the pre-boil pH it was 5.4. The 90 min. post boil dropped to 5.05.  When I brew light colored lagers which require little to no water adjustment and have no dark roast grains the pre-boil and post boil pH are nearly the same.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: crash cooling ales
« on: October 08, 2011, 07:38:31 AM »
When I crash cool an ale I hold it at 40 degrees which is the temperature which yeast will drop out of suspension for a few days before transferring it to a keg.  It puts a little less stress on the yeast and still achieves the same result.

When crashing a lager the recommendation is 3-4 degrees per day until you reach lagering temp.  This will keep the yeast active although at a much lower rate so they are still cleaning up the beer during the lagering stage.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Competition letdown
« on: May 20, 2011, 10:15:04 AM »
Try this. Go to the BJCP website and look up the 2008 style guidelines, find the specifications for the beer you entered into the competition and look at the end where they give you the commercial examples. Go to your local beer store and see if you can find a few fresh examples that have been stored properly and compare it to your beer.  When you do this make sure the're all at the correct serving temp, sit in a quiet room with no distractions, and concentrate on what your experiencing.  In addition while your on the BJCP site download a few copies of their score sheets and try to fill them out as you do your tasting. Then let us know how you rated your beer against the benchmark commercial samples.  As was previously suggested read Gordon Strong’s new book Brewing Better Beer it will help you immensely.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Anybody Read Mosher's Tasting Beer?
« on: March 14, 2011, 08:31:54 AM »
Well written, very informative.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First Time Judging Beer
« on: February 14, 2011, 02:47:19 PM »
I'm in the same boat as you this Saturday.
A suggestion I received was to take a marker with you so you can write the entry number on the sample cup in case you want to go back to it again.

I can see why you'd do this, but the aroma of the marker might interfere with your perception of the beer. Anyway, it's better practice to finish judging a beer and move on.

As to having the style guidelines to hand - absolutely. In fact, the BJCP guide tells judges to review the style guidelines at the table.

I should clarify. The marker should be a grease pencil.
 

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: First Time Judging Beer
« on: February 14, 2011, 02:10:36 PM »
I'm in the same boat as you this Saturday.
A suggestion I received was to take a marker with you so you can write the entry number on the sample cup in case you want to go back to it again.

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: EZ Water Calc 2.0 question
« on: February 13, 2011, 04:28:43 PM »
Pat:
A good pH meter will not only give you more accurate readings it will give you some piece of mind.
If you can afford it, It’s worth the investment! IMO

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All Grain Brewing / Re: EZ Water Calc 2.0 question
« on: February 12, 2011, 09:37:44 AM »
Since carafa is 300-340L I would consider it a roasted malt for the purpose of buffering.  Since these calculators are not exact I always add 2/3 to 3/4 of the recommended salts and then dial it in after the initial pH reading.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Another Acetaldehyde Question
« on: February 10, 2011, 10:37:11 AM »
If your confident in your pitch, time, temperature, and sanitation, did you consider wort oxygenation which can also contribute to acetaldehyde.

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: Harshness - How much alkalinity is too much?
« on: September 10, 2010, 06:35:30 AM »
Another topic I remember reading about somewhere that mash pH balances as low as 4.5 and that it may have had higher efficiencies?   I thought about that a lot too, and it just confused the hell out of me so I'm deleting that out of the hardrive in my head... too many conflicts for my little brain.     :D

A pH of 4.5 is where a beer usually finishes up after fermentation.

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