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Messages - majorvices

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How long is your brew day?
« on: September 30, 2016, 04:01:55 AM »
I had a 7 hour lauter the other day on a Rye Imperial Stout .... oh lort! It sucked!

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I did a double take on this thinking it was spam (I make $200K a year placing tiny classified ads)  :P

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 29, 2016, 04:12:35 AM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

You may be overpitching then.
What's wrong with a 3 day medium  gravity ale fermentation? I do tend to pitch closer to commercial pitch rates.

For a wheat beer you want to actually pitch near the low end of the range to develop those yeast flavors. And if you are pitching at 58 it should take longer than 3 days to reach terminal gravity on an ale yeast. I brew a Belgian wheat beer regularly (as a commercial brewer pitching at "commercial rates" I should add ;) ) and generally have about 5-6 day fermentations which is exactly what I want.

I personally think a 72 hour fermentation on just about any style of beer except for the very lowest SG beers is simply too fast of a fermentation. You simply want some of that yeast growth to happen to create those pleasant yeast derived flavors. You certainly don't want too much yeast growth or you can get solventy flavors and problems with head retention. But you can also get "yeast bite" problems on beers that are overpitched and fast fermented.

Of course, as with everything brewing, YMMV and your process may work totally fine for you. I'm just speaking from experience (but also from what I have learned over the years).

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:45:13 PM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)
I like this profile as well. Other than the 72 hours, I would be at terminal gravity by then. But 24 works for me.

You may be overpitching then.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:31:39 PM »
Depends what you are trying to do, 72 hours at 58 and then ramping up to 64-66 gives me the best blend of phenolics and banana. There are also German weissbier brewers that ferment much warmer.

Anyone truly interested in the stye the book by Warner is excellent (so is his Kölsch book)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 06:03:41 PM »
That's crazy...I doubt that's what Weihenstephaner does...


I thought the same. I can't claim any knowledge of their practices though. But quite a few brewers (some here, some brewer friends of mine) seem to feel that 3068 is more clove heavy from 62-64F, more banana/bubblegum above 65F.  Maybe a difference in perception. I've never heard of it being used in the 50s, though.

Yep, Eric Warner's great book "Brewing German Wheat Beers" recommends starting off at 58 degrees and he worked at a Bavarian weissbier brewery. It is one of the best CBS series books. Some aren't very good but that one is essential to understanding the secrets of brewring German Hefeweizen.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Done with hefes
« on: September 28, 2016, 05:50:57 PM »
Try Troegs Dream Weaver wheat. Best American Hefeweizen I have had. A lot of times the German one's we get over here are not very good with few exceptions.

I have made some absolutely killer homebrew versions before but have struggled making great commercial versions and I think open fermentation is the key here (not so much on 5-10 gallon batches though, sorry you aren't building up enough pressure to make a difference especially if you aren't using an air lock). Troegs uses open fermentation.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« on: September 25, 2016, 06:02:29 AM »
There's no surprise to any of this. When the economy tanks, DIY goes up. When the economy improves, DIY goes down. Homebrewing also got caught up in the waves of everything local plus craft beer. Lots of people were going to abandon homebrewing when they could start affording/justifying $10 six packs of beer. Plenty of people got the starter kits as Christmas gifts and brewed a couple of times only to decide they didn't like cleaning, waiting for the beer, etc. You can only sell those starter kits so many times.

There is a correction but it's a good thing. What's being lost in breadth of new brewers is being made up for in depth of knowledge, experience and technical expertise.

There may be some truth to what you say but it in no way applies to me or do I think it applies to most folks here. I never brewed beer to save money. In fact, if you factor in the time it takes to brew a 5 or 10 gallon batch you aren't saving any money at all. But regardless, I have always enjoyed brewing, from the very first batch, for the sake of the craft itself. There is just something deeply satisfying in brewing.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« on: September 24, 2016, 09:16:11 AM »

Love it! Did you do that one?

Nah there was a beerfest in Nashville someone was selling them.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« on: September 24, 2016, 08:25:24 AM »

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« on: September 24, 2016, 04:12:10 AM »
I will home brew until they pry the mash paddle from my cold dead hands....

My old forum handle back in the day when the B3 forum was cool.


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All Grain Brewing / Re: Where to buy RO Water?
« on: September 22, 2016, 03:49:04 AM »
Denver water is going to be extremely soft! Check your local water report before you bother investing in RO water, it probably is pointless. You most likely just need to filer.

13
Beer Recipes / Re: Hoppy Lager/Non traditional pilsner
« on: September 21, 2016, 11:21:47 AM »
Tommy, for our Hops Fell Hop Lager I use Magnum for bittering and a blend of cascade, Tettnanger and Madarina for WP hops. I also use a 10 min addition of Manadarina. Malt is a blend of Pils, Vienna, Flaked Maize and cara foam. Not sure if you have had HFHL but it has no dankness to it, rather it has bright citrus notes and a medium light body.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: gose without sour mash?
« on: September 20, 2016, 02:21:09 PM »
we did our first kettle sour Gose this year. Turned out great (for the kids who like that crap, not me. Yuck). We cooled the kettle down to 80 and pitched a Lacto culture from Wyeast. Let it sit 3 days until the pH hit 3.2. Was amazed at how fast the pH dropped.

Granted, this was on a 15 bbl batch so not sure how much faster or slower a 10 gallon batch would be. It would certainly be depending on how healthy your culture is and how warm you keep the lacto.

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wich is the better bock yeast
« on: September 19, 2016, 06:14:16 PM »
  Thanks Denny. I get the fact that we don't want too many generations of reproduction if we wish to maintain beer quality and yeast performance. What I don't get is how we have available year in and year out consistent yeast strains that obviously are uncounted generations descended from their original progenitors. If there is so much genetic degradation after 3 or 4 generations that beer quality is compromised, how do the folks who provide us with yeast manage to overcome this instability?

You are putting a lot more stress on your yeast during fermentation than what a lab does when it replicates a strain, and they have pure cultures to fall back on. Even then, some mutation probably does happen over time.

But even that isn't what denny was talking about. He is saying that you don't want the yeast growth to be too great during the fermentation.

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