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Messages - majorvices

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1
I don't clean my home taps often enough. Probably once every 2 month (perlicks).

At the brewery I have them cleaned weekly. It's a lot easier to clean them when you can say "Hey, kid, clean the taps." ;)

2
While this thread reinforced it, I know that I need to pay attention to the CO2 that I use in my brewing. Before a year or so ago, I would have said that CO2 was CO2.

I used to think that about 8 years ago until I started talking to Co2 companies. Beverage grade Co2 is absolutely what you want. That said I still believe that on the homebrew side, as long as you are keeping your beer cold and taking other measures to minimize o2 pick up during racking/etc it's not as crucial as some make it out to be. Keeping your beer cold minimizes the effects of DO.

But absolutely if you can get beverage grade Co2 I'm not sure why you would settle for anything less, especially if you are force carbbing.

3
Your beer is going to get cloudy as the yeast ferment the beer. Depending on what yeast you use it may take some time for the yeast to drop out of solution and clear the beer.

You will need to take a final gravity reading with a hydrometer to know if your fermentation is finished, but when you are sure it is finished you will want to get it cold, that will help drop the yeast out and clear it up (although cold temps also set a protein based "chill haze", but that's another story.)

4
Sounds like none of has has actually tried it.  I went to the website too, and my local market supposedly has it.  I'm gonna make a beer run and report back!

I just tried it. Alestate, it tastes remarkably like Hops Fell! You nailed that! If it doesn't use Mandarina hops I'd be shocked.

5
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 21, 2018, 05:39:54 PM »
I have not sampled the stuff we get delivered in small cylinders 

That would make for an interesting data point.

I'll check tomorrow

6
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 21, 2018, 05:36:54 PM »
I’ve never been able to detect o2 in our co2. I have not sampled the stuff we get delivered in small cylinders 


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7
You probably have to think about it from the perspective of a beer drinker or marketer (throw out all you know as a brewer.)

I have never seen that beer. So my guess is  just a guess. I bet it is  something along the lines of Hops Fell (hoppy lager).  Most consumers think a lager is a yellow lawn mower beer. This one is bigger and has lots of hop flavor. You know, “like an Ale.”

Yeah, Hops Fell was a marketing failure for us. Name sucked and the theme "Hop Lager" sucked too. Beer was well received by those that understood it. That was the first "Flagship" product we have ever pulled from the market. I might re-brand it this year.

So I get that it is marketing it's just really vague to me. It doesn't explain to the knowledgeable brewer or the passive consumer what it is.
I think Hops Fell was good and I wasn’t trying to rag on it.  I will admit, not being from Alabama, “Hops Fell on Alabama” and its similarity to “Stars fell on Alabama” went right over my head.
I didn’t think you were and, yeah, dumb name I never liked


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8
Haven't seen the beer, just the advertising. But it puts me in mind of the "specially brewed to combine the qualities of a lager and an ale" slogans attached to Molson Golden and other Cream Ale-type old timers.

Ahhh ... maybe it is a cream ale. I didn't think of that. I used to love to drink my dad's Genny Cream Ale growing up in PA as a teenager.
Genny "pounders" -- the 16 oz stubby bottles!  The go-to of my youth.
Haha! Yeah I still have a soft spot for that beer


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9
Haven't seen the beer, just the advertising. But it puts me in mind of the "specially brewed to combine the qualities of a lager and an ale" slogans attached to Molson Golden and other Cream Ale-type old timers.

Ahhh ... maybe it is a cream ale. I didn't think of that. I used to love to drink my dad's Genny Cream Ale growing up in PA as a teenager.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 21, 2018, 05:21:56 PM »
I do agree with the poster who says that it probably isn't as important for the homebrewer who keeps his beer cold and drinks it fresh and young.

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 21, 2018, 04:59:55 PM »
We have been getting questions about why people should be interested in CO2 purity and what damaging effects the O2 impurities within bottled CO2 can have on the finished beers of ALL brewers.

We have been working on a blog post for some time and we finally finalized and posted a write-up on it today:

http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/brewing-methods/carbon-dioxide-purity/

Let's discuss it!

It's great to have a DO meter so that you can test the purity of your Co2. Unfortunately a decent one costs about $8K.... I would gladly test anyone's Co2 for them for a small fee.

Orbisphere?


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We have a Beverly.

12
You probably have to think about it from the perspective of a beer drinker or marketer (throw out all you know as a brewer.)

I have never seen that beer. So my guess is  just a guess. I bet it is  something along the lines of Hops Fell (hoppy lager).  Most consumers think a lager is a yellow lawn mower beer. This one is bigger and has lots of hop flavor. You know, “like an Ale.”

Yeah, Hops Fell was a marketing failure for us. Name sucked and the theme "Hop Lager" sucked too. Beer was well received by those that understood it. That was the first "Flagship" product we have ever pulled from the market. I might re-brand it this year.

So I get that it is marketing it's just really vague to me. It doesn't explain to the knowledgeable brewer or the passive consumer what it is.

13
I can’t figure out there angle here... a lager that tastes like an ale??? I’m not following. 


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14
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 Purity and Why It's So Important
« on: January 21, 2018, 02:23:51 PM »
We have been getting questions about why people should be interested in CO2 purity and what damaging effects the O2 impurities within bottled CO2 can have on the finished beers of ALL brewers.

We have been working on a blog post for some time and we finally finalized and posted a write-up on it today:

http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/brewing-methods/carbon-dioxide-purity/

Let's discuss it!

It's great to have a DO meter so that you can test the purity of your Co2. Unfortunately a decent one costs about $8K.... I would gladly test anyone's Co2 for them for a small fee.

15
Going Pro / Re: Interview questions.
« on: January 20, 2018, 08:42:36 PM »
Simple questions about cleaning procedures, brewing procedures, etc. If I were you I'd worry about why a group was opening a brewery without having an idea who their head brewer was going to be. How much do THEY know about brewing? seems like they are putting the cart before the horse.

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