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Messages - dmtaylor

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1
Beer Recipes / Re: German Altbier & Irish Ale Hybrid
« on: July 15, 2018, 01:38:50 PM »
I like the direction. I would personally avoid k97. I have used it many time oz and us05 would work better for an alt as far as fermentis dry yeast is concerned.

I haven't used K-97 yet but I do have a pack in my fridge based on tons of positive feedback I have seen on it.  Eventually I'll give it a go.  What don't you like about it exactly?

2
Ingredients / Re: whirlpool/dry hops? how much?
« on: July 15, 2018, 01:35:29 PM »


Not a bad start, but IMHO way too little for IPAs. You'll get much better hoppiness from a WP/flameout and dry hop rate of 2-3# per bbl (each), which translates to 1.0-1.5 oz per gallon. More loss, but that's a tradeoff. I suggest a bittering charge at 60 min or even 30 min for all the IBUs. After flameout, bring the temp down to ~170, do a steep at this temp for 20-30 min with 3#/bbl. Use the same rate for dry hopping.

ok so for a 5 gallon batch, that is bittering + 5-7oz wp+5-7oz. dh

Damn! thats a lot o hops.  time to start buying by the lb i guess!  =)

I've seen data from commercial breweries that suggests they use the equivalent of 4-5 oz per 5 gallons at most.  Now maybe the New England guys use more, but I also don't like chunks of hops in my pint glass.  As for cat pee........ I've got 4 cats and some dirty litterboxes here, let me know if you'd like any or all of that.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Plum beer?
« on: July 15, 2018, 12:28:51 AM »
I have not made a plum beer but I imagine the plum flavor will be extremely mild -- 4 lb in 5 gallons will be essentially undetectable except for a slight tartness.  If you could just make say 1.5 gallons with your 4 lb it will be better balanced as far as I can tell.

4
Ingredients / Re: whirlpool/dry hops? how much?
« on: July 14, 2018, 11:08:18 PM »
Your LHBS guy is *exactly* right IMHO.  For 5 gallons.  Any more than those amounts, and you're wasting hops.  Any less, and you won't get the hop forward beer that you want.  Those are all the right numbers.

Cheers.

5
Beer Recipes / Re: German Altbier & Irish Ale Hybrid
« on: July 14, 2018, 12:42:40 AM »
UPDATE: Okay, gents, I put the recipe into software this evening and now I can see where a couple of adjustments would be needed, especially for color.  Updated recipe as follows:

8 oz CaraPils malt
4 oz CaraMunich malt
4 oz English Medium Crystal malt (~55 L)
2 oz Carafa III (~600 L, for red color adjustment)

Crush these specialty malts and steep in 2.7 gallons water as it heats up until you reach 170 F, then pull the steeping bag out.  Remove from the heat, then add:

5.5 lb Maris Otter LME
1 lb cane sugar

Stir well to dissolve, then bring to the boil.  Then add:

2 oz Northern Brewer hops

Boil for 15 minutes.  Then top up with cool, chlorine-free water to hit 5 gallons.  Pitch any of the following yeasts, or whatever else you like:

Wyeast 1007
K-97
WLP004
Wyeast 1084

Let ferment in the low to mid 60s F (16-18 C) until the yeast settles out -- could be a couple days, could be a month, depending on the yeast that you selected.  Patience.  Then package and enjoy.

Cheers and good luck (again).  :)

6
Beer Recipes / Re: German Altbier & Irish Ale Hybrid
« on: July 13, 2018, 03:10:16 PM »
I had to rely on hand-calculations (which *should* *hopefully* be reasonably accurate as I don't have software here (at work)), but here's approximately what I would suggest, assuming a 5-gallon batch, with 2.5 gallon abbreviated boil + 2.5 gallons top-off post-boil, aiming for approximately 1.057 OG:

8 oz CaraPils malt
4 oz CaraMunich malt
4 oz English Medium Crystal malt (~55 L)

Crush these specialty malts and steep in 2.7 gallons water as it heats up until you reach 170 F, then pull the steeping bag out.  Remove from the heat, then add:

6 lb Maris Otter LME
1 lb cane sugar

Stir well to dissolve, then bring to the boil.  Then add:

2 oz Northern Brewer hops

Boil for 15 minutes.  Then top up with cool, chlorine-free water to hit 5 gallons.  Pitch any of the following yeasts, or whatever else you like:

Wyeast 1007
K-97
WLP004
Wyeast 1084

Let ferment in the low to mid 60s F (16-18 C) until the yeast settles out -- could be a couple days, could be a month, depending on the yeast that you selected.  Patience.  Then package and enjoy.

Cheers and good luck.  :)

7
Beer Recipes / Re: German Altbier & Irish Ale Hybrid
« on: July 13, 2018, 02:08:56 PM »
Oh, this is *extract*...... hang on, we will try to come up with something that will work.........

8
Beer Recipes / Re: Kolsch or Cream Ale?
« on: July 11, 2018, 05:46:24 PM »
Maybe it's a helles.  If it is very clean, not fruity, not winey, maybe it's a helles.  Doesn't matter that you didn't use a lager yeast -- if it doesn't taste like an ale, then for the purposes of entering comps, maybe it will score best as a lager.  I've gone the opposite direction before, entered a lager as an ale, and it medaled.

9
Beer Recipes / Re: German Altbier & Irish Ale Hybrid
« on: July 10, 2018, 10:43:33 PM »
Why not go with 50/50 German/British malts, use Northern Brewer hops which are loved by both the Germans and the Brits, and use Irish ale yeast.  There you go, that would work.

10
Homebrew Con 2018 / Re: "Style Hunter" Provisional Styles
« on: July 10, 2018, 10:41:21 PM »
Are we going to use this thread to complain about the new styles or should we start a new one?

Why not just use this one?

I was actually slightly (VERY slightly) serious about the Butterfly Pea Blue Glitter IPA.  I predict this could become a provisional style in 1-2 more years.  Maybe.

11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: New Fermentis strains
« on: July 10, 2018, 04:08:58 PM »
BE-134 isn't very new.  HA-18 seems brand-new though.  I'm trying to find dry equivalents for most styles, but on these two I am not sure yet on equivalents.  BE-134 is probably one of the well-known Trappist strains but I'm not yet sure which one.

12
Homebrew Con 2018 / Re: "Style Hunter" Provisional Styles
« on: July 10, 2018, 01:25:11 AM »
Blue Glitter IPA.

J/K, I dunno.

13
Sorry Dave. I have to disagree.

While I agree location is important, I've seen breweries in great locations and busy areas that served crappy beers and they closed in short order.

I hope you are right, honestly.  I do think competition and market dilution is probably an even more critical factor than quality.  If your brewery is the only one in town (Crescent City in NOLA in 2003, I'm talking to you), then people will flock there regardless of quality.  But, if there are 2 or 3 or 10 breweries in close proximity, and some are serving stellar beer while others are serving crappy beer, then of course the crappy ones are going to lose.

Meanwhile, for ~15 years, the Courthouse Pub in Manitowoc was the only brewpub or microbrewery in the county where I live.  And their beer is --- honest-to-God --- UTTER CRAP, friggin undrinkable.  No one I know ever went there for anything but the FOOD, NOT the beer.  They fully deserve their reputation for bad beer.  HOWEVER, fortunate for them, the food is very good, which has kept them alive; and also, until more recently, the average joe around here didn't care about the difference between Busch Light and fizzy extract water as long as it gave them a buzz.  But now, finally, a new nanobrewery has just opened (PetSkull) and another is almost ready to rock (and I've already tasted it, Sabbatical), and FORTUNATELY, both are making fantastic beers.  So finally we will have someplace to flock for beer.  And, like I say, we are (finally!) fortunate that they won't all suck.  But even if I'm wrong and one of the latter two ends up only being mediocre instead of stellar, they will still have regulars at both as long as they're not utter crap like that other one.  In the end, all will remain in business, albeit for different reasons.  All 3 are in pretty decent locations downtown, and I think that definitely helps, especially for the Courthouse Pub.  If on the other hand they were surrounded by old abandoned warehouses and/or in a shady neighborhood... might not be successful.  Now........ if 15 more breweries are built in this county in the next 5-10 years, I cannot promise that all 15 will be successful.  With that many to choose from in a small community, there would certainly be winners and losers.  In a bigger city, though, it wouldn't matter quite as much.  So many factors.

But anyway.

Cheers.

14
Not a bad survey IMO.  Short & sweet and captures the current trends... for those who care about trends.  To me personally, trends might not matter at all.  But for those developing ideas for a new brewery, current trends matter a lot.  Lure the sheeple properly and they will come.

A couple key things to keep in mind besides board games & cornhole: find a great location.  If you build a brewery in the middle of nowhere, people will still come.... but not as many.  Conversely, a really crappy brewery in a really great location will get a ton of business regardless of quality.

Cheers.

15
Welcome to the forum.

I'm just here for the knowledge.  I've never been to any large events.  Biggest one I've been to is Great Lakes Brew Fest in Racine, WI.  But we don't have big celebrities there or anything.  Someday, someday......  And anyone thirsty is always welcome to come on over and help me drink up my ~10 cases of homebrew.  I'm on-call for work this week again......

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