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Messages - yugamrap

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Since it’s 4/20...
« on: April 20, 2018, 10:29:12 PM »
That’s why you freeze them immediately if you can’t process immediately. Loss to mold or rot is virtually eliminated.

Here’s a bit of info on the process.
https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/what-is-live-resin-cannabis-concentrate

I'm guessing you don't know a lot about commercial hop production.  Freezing them until use is completely impractical.
I’m guessing you’re not good at guessing.

You would only freeze what you plan on turning into the extract.

I'm guessing you've been doing a good job of celebrating 4/20. 

Denny is right about the impracticality of freezing hops at the commercial scale.  The industry isn't set up for that - at least not at this point in time.  Hops are a crop with a very brief harvest season, and many of the farms share harvesting and processing equipment through cooperatives.  It's not like we're talking about a few chest freezers here.  Large commercial-scale flash freezers would probably be needed.  There probably isn't a reasonable return on investment for that - at least not yet.   
Once again you only freeze what becomes concentrates. You could start with a couple hundred pounds capacity for a small trial basis, before you scale up if it works well.

It’s being done all day every day right now with a genetic relative of the hop plant. They make industrial flash freezers... people said the same thing about supercritical CO2 extractors before the entire industry adopted them. The economics are there, if the product is superior! A third party could even contract wet hops at a discount and do the extraction as their value added piece. Get contracts from all the regions and do it all year round. Markets evolve, guys.

If brewers can get flavor and aroma (assuming it’s the desirable) out of an extract along with bitterness and all of the benefits of the current concentrates, then they won’t be able to keep it in stock. 

Glad they timestamp these posts.

Oh, and I have a medical condition, bro... it’s not a celebration, but thanks anyway.

I'm not poo-pooing the idea - it's kinda intriguing.  I just think it's not practical on a large scale - yet.  It'll definitely happen if the larger commercial brewers find an application for it like they did hop extracts for bittering.  Is this one of the processes used for making medical marijuana products that address symptoms without the high?  I saw some news about products like that in trials for kids who could benefit.

I hope you're getting the relief you need.  Legal medical application has been long overdue.
 

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How's your LHBS doing?
« on: April 20, 2018, 10:17:31 PM »
Yep, I think G&G looks to be a survivor.  I was talking to John about the new West Branch Malts in Brunswick, I hope he can carry their malt in the future.  Ohio grown barley even.  And G&G's offshoot Renaissance Artisan Distillers is a great addition.  (Try King's Cut if you like whisky.) I don't know any of the shops in Cleveland anymore, but G&G seemed to be a step ahead of the pack from the time they opened in the old spot in the early '90s.

I also have to go there to visit the Cuyahoga Cup since we SNOBs haven't managed to win it away from SAAZ and have it on our home turf for a while!  ;-)

3
I wish I'd have known a lot sooner how much I enjoy brewing and how many great friendships, acquaintances and experiences it would lead to.   


4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: How's your LHBS doing?
« on: April 20, 2018, 09:44:14 PM »
You know, I went in to talk to my guy today, actually to tip him off to a potential opportunity distributing for a new malt house, whose owner I'd just talked to.  He just seemed harried and tired, as always these days.  He's fulfilling for Amazon,  has a distillery going, but the brew shop biz seems to grind him down.  I hope something like localism (subject of my visit -- he's selling local hops already -- ) helps LHBS carve out a niche the big online dealers don't occupy.  (Mine FWIW is 30+ years old, early on national by mail, and also longtime online.)

I presume you're referring to Grape & Granary?  I hope our friends on Home Ave. stay around a long time.  They're my go-to shop in the Cleveland/Akron area.  The other shops around here just don't carry as much variety or turn their inventory over fast enough.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Since it’s 4/20...
« on: April 20, 2018, 09:39:23 PM »
That’s why you freeze them immediately if you can’t process immediately. Loss to mold or rot is virtually eliminated.

Here’s a bit of info on the process.
https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/what-is-live-resin-cannabis-concentrate

I'm guessing you don't know a lot about commercial hop production.  Freezing them until use is completely impractical.
I’m guessing you’re not good at guessing.

You would only freeze what you plan on turning into the extract.

I'm guessing you've been doing a good job of celebrating 4/20. 

Denny is right about the impracticality of freezing hops at the commercial scale.  The industry isn't set up for that - at least not at this point in time.  Hops are a crop with a very brief harvest season, and many of the farms share harvesting and processing equipment through cooperatives.  It's not like we're talking about a few chest freezers here.  Large commercial-scale flash freezers would probably be needed.  There probably isn't a reasonable return on investment for that - at least not yet.   

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Do you belong to a homebrew club?
« on: April 16, 2018, 05:20:26 PM »
I've been a club member www.beersnobs.org for about 10 years and have been an officer and President and help with club events like competitions and outings.  In the time I've been a member, we've grown from about 70 members to over 200, and we typically have 75-90 members at our monthly meetings.

With each set of officers/president, the club evolves a bit - but there are some things we've always done and some more recent things that seem to work for us.  One of the best changes I think we made was to keep the structured meeting with event updates and presentations, but to make the 2nd half of the meeting "social time."  That really helps limit extraneous discussion during presentations, and gives everyone a chance to shoot the breeze and drink with their buddies within the club.

Our club is also fortunate to have a number of local pros - some founding members of the club - who regularly participate in club meetings, give presentations, and open their businesses to us for collaborations, competitions and other events.

Some meetings I learn a lot - others are more social for me.  I just think it's key to be open to change and to get new members involved early.  Over the years I've been in it, the club has evolved to have a wider range of members in age, gender and interests.  Aa an example, a group of our women members recently did Pink Boot Society collaboration brews at three local craft breweries and those beers will be on tap for upcoming club nights out at those same breweries. 

7
I often find Saisons disappointing - both craft-brewed and home-brewed.  That said, there are commercial and home-brewed examples that are sublime - I'm not a Saison hater.  I think its a style where it's easy for a brewer to get lax or complacent.  I think that's true of some other "rustic" styles, too.  Just because a beer style can be fermented at a higher temperature and can be expected to have some funky or rustic character doesn't give the brewer a pass on using good fermentation practices or showing appropriate restraint with ingredients.

8
Equipment and Software / Re: 5500 watt element breaker size?
« on: April 02, 2018, 09:21:26 PM »
First, make sure the breaker you choose is GFCI or use a separate GFCI for protection.

Then, do some math. 

Watts = Amps x Volts ... so ... Amps = Watts / Volts

Build in a 15-20% safety factor on the breaker (local code often requires this).

You're probably really getting closer to 220 volts than 240 volts from your utility.

So, 5500 watts / 220 volts X 0.80 = 20 amps.  If you have a 30-amp breaker, you should have plenty of amps to handle the element, associated electronics (which typically only draw a few hundred milliamps), and probably a couple March or Chugger pumps, too.  Adding that second 1650-watt element would put you at 26 amps - still under 30, but closer than I'd care to be if running other accessories (pumps. etc.). 

If you want to run two elements at the same time, you're probably better advised to use a bigger breaker.  I have a 15-gallon 3-vessel system with a 5500-watt element in the HLT and another 5500-watt in the BK.  The system also has 2 Chugger pumps.  I run both elements at the same time for back-to-back batches and/or to heat up cleaning solution while boiling.  I have a 50-amp GFCI breaker for the whole system with both pumps running, the HLT element at 100% and the BK element at 80%.  Both elements at 100% would be 11,000 Watts / 220 volts X 0.80 =  40 amps.  So, that leaves another 8 amps at 220 volts to spare for the 120-volt pumps and electronics.

Also, don't overlook that you'll need heavier-gauge wire to handle the higher amperage.  I bit the bullet and had a licensed electrician install the breaker and run the heavier-gauge cable to the 220/240-volt outlet.

Be safe and have fun.

Brew on!

9
Equipment and Software / Re: exaust fan
« on: April 02, 2018, 08:51:53 PM »
Since you're using electric heat, you don't need to turn over the whole room to evacuate combustion gases.  Your main concern is the moisture while boiling HLT and MLT can be covered while in use.  I have a 6" 440 CFM VenTech IF6 inline fan on a variable speed control and run it just above the lowest setting.  I made a hood out of a 30-qt stainless mixing bowl that hangs right over the boil kettle and used flexible duct to the fan inlet.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Sarfale US-05
« on: April 02, 2018, 08:39:33 PM »
US-05 is a "Swiss Army Knife" of yeasts.  Follow the rehydration instructions from Fermentis, and be sure to aerate/oxygenate your wort well.  If you do that, you should have activity in 24 hours or less.  You can run it slow at lower temps for a cleaner profile, or let it rip at higher temps to get some estery character.  If it's fresh, its a good performer and will attenuate well.  I've run it as low as 60F and as high as 72F.

Keep in mind that some fermenters don't always seal well - so sometimes an airlock isn't a good indicator of activity.  I've had beers where I thought they never started because the airlock wasn't bubbling and when I checked gravity, they were almost done.

11
All Grain Brewing / Re: Decoction mash target temps
« on: January 08, 2018, 07:04:06 PM »
Check this out if you're interested in decoction mashing: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php/Decoction_Mashing

I generally pull a bigger decoction volume than calculated, then add the excess back to the mash after it cools to the desired mash step temperature.  Though the article really gets detailed, remember that decoction mashing was used before thermometers were commonly available.  So, ratios of "known-temperature" (i.e., boiling) decoction were used to hit mash steps with relative accuracy.

I seldom do full decoction mashes anymore.  I've found that I can get similar flavor profiles with much less effort  using small additions of melanoidin and aromatic malt.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hitting Cruise Control
« on: January 04, 2018, 06:15:13 PM »
I totally get the need to take a step back from time to time.  I've been brewing for a little over 10 years, and am on a hiatus right now that will probably go another 30-45 days.  This break started with my wish to make my brew day more fun.  In my case, that means building an indoor electric brewery in a dedicated space in my basement.  Why?  Well, I brew all year-round and don't enjoy brewing as much in the summer when it's hot & humid or in the winter when it's frigid outside.  As well, the set-up and tear-down each time I brew, and schlepping gear, supplies, and fermenters to/from the basement has lost its charm as I've gotten older.

So, I've undertaken a pretty big remodel of the basement - including adding a 1/2-bath and relocating the laundry  area.  And, to keep myself on track, I've committed not to brew again until I can brew on the new system.  Though I haven't brewed for a couple months, the end of the project is in sight and I'm excited to brew the first few batches on the new system.  It'll be fun learning the new system and interesting to see how much I end up tweaking my established recipes.

I'm not so much simplifying the brewing process (I'm staying with a 3-vessel HERMS system) as I am streamlining the brew day by eliminating or changing a lot of the stuff mentioned above.   No more enduring the heat or cold, or battling the wind.  I'll be able to brew, ferment, package and serve all on one level of the house.  Heck - I might even be able to do a batch on a weeknight after work (that might be wishful thinking).

All that said, thanks to Jim for bringing up the topic.  I find that I often appreciate things more after being away from them for a while.

Prost!

13
The Pub / Re: song title game
« on: August 25, 2017, 07:16:56 PM »
Bell Bottom Blues - Derek & the Dominoes

14
Wood/Casks / Re: Oak in a Solera
« on: August 25, 2017, 07:13:42 PM »
I have a 3-carboy solera I use for Flanders Red. 

The first carboy is the newest beer with a standard rubber stopper and 3-piece airlock.  The beer stays in the first carboy for about a year, with 1 oz of medium-toast French oak cubes for the last month or so.  I just drop the cubes in some boiling water for a few minutes to sanitize them before adding them to the carboy,

The second carboy is capped with an orange carboy cover and standard 3-piece airlock, and has 1 oz of oak cubes in it that were previously used in the first carboy.  The difference is that these cubes never leave the second carboy, and the carboy is never entirely emptied or cleaned.  That lets them emulate a barrel as the bacteria culture gets established on them.

The third carboy also has 1 oz of used oak cubes in it from the first batch of Flanders Red I made back in 2013.  Like the second carboy, these cubes never leave the second carboy, and the carboy is never entirely emptied or cleaned.  This carboy is capped with a 3-piece airlock in a drilled natural cork stopper.  I keep the cork a little moist, checking it each time I top up the airlock.  The moist natural cork allows just enough oxygen exchange to help develop some acetic character.

Once a year, I blend a keg of Flanders Red from the three kegs.  The first carboy tends to be a bit sweeter and fruitier than the other two.  The third carboy tends to be the most sour and has some acetic character.  The second carboy is somewhere in between.  When blending, I leave 10-20% of the beer in the third carboy, then top it up with beer from the second carboy leaving at least 10% of that beer behind.  Beer from the first carboy is then used to top up the other two which results in an empty first carboy ready to be cleaned and receive the new year's batch of wort.

The idea is that the solera will develop its own sort of character or "terroir" from the bacteria culture that stays on the oak cubes in the carboys.  As well, the character will evolve over time through the transferring and blending from the newer carboys to the older ones.  Right now, the third carboy has a blend of beer in it from batches of wort brewed in 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016.  The second carboy has a blend of beer from 2014, 2015 and 2016.  The first carboy has only beer from January of 2017.  I'll add the oak around Thanksgiving, then blend a new keg and brew the next batch or wort around the new year.   

15
The Pub / Re: Congratulations...You're Old
« on: April 27, 2017, 06:56:14 PM »
I have shoes older than Harry Potter.  Probably a few t-shirts, too.

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