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Messages - ANDREW.GROGAN1

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1
The ROT for bags is that they reduce utilization by about 10%.  When I use them I increase all hops before 20 min. by 10% to compensate.  Testing has found that to be pretty accurate.

I assume anything under 20, you don't worry about?

2
All Grain Brewing / Hop spider/hop bags effect on hop utilization
« on: March 03, 2017, 08:46:47 AM »
I know this is a topic that's been discussed before, but I am wondering if anyone has any actual results of testing that show the effect of a hop spider on hop utilization.  I have always used a large hop bags in my brews but generally brew low to moderately hopping beers.

I am currently designing a NE IPA recipe that has a total of 7 oz of hops in the kettle.  1 for 60, 3oz at flame out and an additional 3oz as the temp of the wort drops to 160.

I would like to use a bag or spider as I usually do, because it keep my kettle and pump clean but I don't want to lose any hoppy goodness.     

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Safe to lager is plastic better bottle?
« on: February 12, 2017, 02:59:29 PM »
Is it safe to lager in a 6 gallon plastic better bottle carboy?  I know there is always a concern with plastic and oxidation.  My lager phase will be 8 weeks at the most.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

4
Is there a safe way to move beer from 22oz bottles to 12oz bottles?  I brewed a beer about a month ago planning to enter it in the AHA National Homebrewers Competition.  They decided to now allow 22oz bottles this year.

If they are allowing 22 oz bottles and your beer is already in 22 oz bottles then why do you need to move it to 12 oz bottles?  (I did not think they allowed the larger 22 oz bottles)

But, if you need to transfer here is a possible way to go about it....

1. Sanitize your receiving bottle and get both your beer and receiving bottle as cold as you can get it without freezing it.
2. Spray some sanitizer around underside of bottle cap and on bottle opener.
3. Open bottle gently, and carefully and slowly pour into empty sanitized bottle.
4. Cap with bottle cap on foam if possible. Keep them cold until shipping.

EDIT - If you can purge the receiving empty bottle with CO2 first your transfer will have a reduced chance of greater oxidation. But do keep in mind this method will still oxidize your beer to some degree.

I post wrong.  I meant they are not excepting, not now accepting. 

5
Is there a safe way to move beer from 22oz bottles to 12oz bottles?  I brewed a beer about a month ago planning to enter it in the AHA National Homebrewers Competition.  They decided to now allow 22oz bottles this year. 

6
Other Fermentables / Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« on: January 23, 2017, 11:15:48 AM »
I have never added additional yeast when bottling and I've had perfect carbonation without it.

I'd rather not add anything but the priming sugar, but I figured with how long it's been sitting, I would have to. 

7
Other Fermentables / Re: Bottle conditioning cider
« on: January 23, 2017, 11:09:05 AM »
Yes, add a sprinkle of fresh yeast.  Roughly 1/10 pack of yeast will be good enough to carbonate 3-6 gallons, i.e., a little dab'll do ya.  Also don't be surprised when it takes 6-8 weeks to carbonate.  It will carb just fine but will take a bit of time.

Cheers.

So enough sugar to carb to the level I want and a pinch of yeast....Sounds like a plan

8
Other Fermentables / Bottle conditioning cider
« on: January 23, 2017, 08:39:31 AM »
I started a batch of hard cider back on October.  After primary and secondary, I am sitting at .992.  What’s the best way to bottle condition this?  I am guessing my yeast numbers are probably pretty low.  Do I need to sprinkle some more in when I bottle?   

9
Yeast and Fermentation / First lager yeast help
« on: January 20, 2017, 08:05:21 AM »
Planning to brew my first lager next week and was looking for advice.  It’s 5.25 gallons of 1.051 Vienna lager.  I am using Saflager 34/70.  Trying to figure out if I want to make a starter or just pitch multiple packets.  According to Brewsmith, I need roughly 450 billion cells.  I am not sure the exact cell count of saflager but I am thinking that’s about 5 packets.  Not sure I can make a proper starter as all I have is a 2L flask. 

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated. 

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 09:17:07 AM »
No. Grains of dry yeast.

Boy do I feel dumb. Thanks for clarifying. 

11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 09:06:23 AM »
A few grains per bottle would be fine, but a syringe will work well too. Adding all that bourbon would take your ABV to ~12.5%. This coupled with the amount of time may have been too much for the yeasts that were still around.

Do you mean un crushed grain?  The idea being that  the yeast in the grain with get with the sugar and carbonate?

12
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 07:06:13 AM »
Depending on how high the alcohol was, coupled with 6 month old yeast, maybe they just didn't have it in them to carbonate. You might try a touch of dry champagne yeast in each bottle, then recap.

I thought about this too but how much is a touch?  I need some level of control.  Don't want fountain soda or a bunch of bottle bombs. 

13
Kegging and Bottling / No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 06:41:05 AM »
Just opened a bottle from my first barrel aged beer.  15 gallon Imperial stout...

Brewed: 6/24
Into the bourbon barrel: 8/3
Bottled: 12/3

Used my normal bottling routine off boiling water/sugar mixture and adding to the bottling bucket.  I also added 1.25 liters of bourbon to the barrel to achieve the bourbon flavor I was looking for.  I opened my first bottle yesterday and there is no carbonation.  Do I need to give it more time or did I not bottle correctly for the amount of time it was in the barrel?  Did I kill the yeast by adding the bourbon?  FG going into the barrel had it at about 10.5% and the Scottish Ale yeast I used is rated up to 12%.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stuck fermentation?
« on: December 03, 2016, 09:43:36 AM »
That FG is very indicative of a high mash temp and higher amounts of cara's.  As a general rule of thumb for me a FG of 1.020 is about 160 mash temp. I bet it's done.

I know this is a real newbie question but I am still learning about all the aspect of all grain brewing, including grains.

Are you considering the roasted/dark malts in my recipe the same as a cara's in terms of the unfermentables they bring to a recipe?

Yes.  Your grist bill has a major effect on fermentability, mash temp less so.


What could I do next time to make a little more fermentable but maintain the flavor I have achieved.  I am pretty happy with how it taste and it fits to the style.

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stuck fermentation?
« on: December 03, 2016, 09:25:48 AM »
That FG is very indicative of a high mash temp and higher amounts of cara's.  As a general rule of thumb for me a FG of 1.020 is about 160 mash temp. I bet it's done.

I know this is a real newbie question but I am still learning about all the aspect of all grain brewing, including grains.

Are you considering the roasted/dark malts in my recipe the same as a cara's in terms of the unfermentables they bring to a recipe?

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