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Messages - dunngood

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: RO Water Chem.
« on: October 28, 2016, 06:21:00 PM »
Ha, now I don’t feel so geeky about bringing my TDS meter into stores and getting funny looks.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: RO Water Chem.
« on: October 28, 2016, 04:54:00 PM »
Please do not assume the water from your store is really RO.
I can not use my well water to brew with so I buy what was advertised as RO water at a fill your bottle station at a big store. Here is the Ad.
Our systems provide four levels of filtration: sediment filters, carbon filters, reverse osmosis and ultraviolet light. The quality of the water is terrific and it is more environmentally friendly and cheaper than buying bottled water.
Here is the test sent in to Ward Labs
pH 8.1
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 353
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.59
Cations / Anions, me/L 6.2 / 6.3
Sodium, Na 141
Potassium, K < 1
Calcium, Ca 1
Magnesium, Mg < 1
Total Hardness, CaCO3 3
Nitrate, NO3-N 0.1 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S 6
Chloride, Cl 58
Carbonate, CO3 6
Bicarbonate, HCO3 244
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 211
Total Phosphorus, P 0.63
Total Iron, Fe < 0.01
"<" - Not Detected / Below Detection Limit
This is softned water not RO water. Ray Ward
I would not water my plants with that much Sodium and that much Bicarbonate will buffer most acid or salt adjustments. With all the filtering and back flushing involved with RO water are those little fill stations really RO?

3
I was also referring to books by Greg Noonan when he states with a clean fermentation, it is usual for the beer to be held in the primary fermenter for two to three days after the kraeusen head has fallen. And the beer not be racked off its yeast sediment until diacetyl has been reabsorbed.
I get the idea that the primary yeast cake helps in some way with this process.

4
Interesting I will have to check that out. Thanks.

5
One of my biggest concerns about racking off the primary yeast cake to soon is the yeast has not cleaned up the off flavors yet.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 05, 2016, 06:13:51 PM »
I have had astringent problems and I am convinced it is the hops. Check this out.

 http://byo.com/stories/item/1124-mash-temperatures--hop-astringency-mr-wizard

Also I know make sure my sparge water is below 6PH.

Just a fast way to check your water is a TDS meter. About $20.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 05, 2016, 06:02:05 PM »
I have had astringent problems and I am convinced it is the hops. Check this out.

 http://byo.com/stories/item/1124-mash-temperatures--hop-astringency-mr-wizard

Also I now make sure my sparge water is below 6PH.

Just a fast way to check your water is a TDS meter. About $20.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 05, 2016, 04:32:50 PM »
Have you had your RO water tested? We have had some very serious problems with our store RO.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Specific gravity.
« on: January 25, 2016, 08:03:29 PM »
One point to remember about PH is 5.0 is 10x more acidic than 6.0. But because PH is logarithmic,  5.0 is 100x more acidic that 7.0+

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Efficiency Loss Without Protein Rest
« on: August 16, 2015, 04:09:09 PM »
One of the most common problems with doing a step mash with the modern grains is poor foam retention. If you are holding your mash at 145f the grains are mostly all converted at 30 mins. Raising the temp then does just a little clean up.

11
No expert here but this is the way I understand it. When liquid yeast is first pitched they need  oxygen to build sterols and other needs for full formation.
The Danstar report says they add enough Lipids to not need this phase and pretty much go to the formation phase where both liquid and dry yeast are wanted to expand 2 to 3 times to finish.
Unless you are brewing a high gravity beer there is enough cell count in a dry pack.

12
I would like to see an experiment done using pure o2 to get the wort up to 10ppm+ that is recommended. I will try that this summer.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lack of hot break at beginning of boil
« on: December 05, 2014, 05:30:17 PM »
This is interesting to me as I do have to watch for boil overs. 10 gallon pot 6 to 7 gallon boils. As I try to get as hard of a hot break as I can it stands to reason that a wider pot will have less of a hot break on the surface but still get you a good hot break.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lack of hot break at beginning of boil
« on: December 04, 2014, 05:51:08 PM »
Is it possible you are using different grains?  Some base grains I use will not break well while others look like egg drop soup. They all seem to clear well. I would think a tall pot with smaller service area at the top would have a thicker break.

15
So you added 8.64 gals. To the mash with no sparge ?

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