Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - zsmith87

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
All Grain Brewing / Caramelizing Wort
« on: October 26, 2017, 02:46:17 PM »
Inspired by a beer that The Alchemist brews, I am trying to plan on brewing an 8% Brown Ale for Thanksgiving.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHa2FtRXYeo

John Kimmich talks about caramelizing the first runnings. Then proceeding on once the sparge is over (which I do batch sparge for all beers) with the normal process. Before I jump into this blindly, does anyone have any advice on how to do this? Should I increase my post boil volume by a half gallon? Do I get out the first runnings and actually bring to a boil, or do I just turn on the burner?

Thanks.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st Lager
« on: September 13, 2017, 03:55:00 PM »
I just finished making a lager with WY2124.  Normally I do the fast schedule and find it works as well as slow, but this time I was going to be out of the country for a while so I just let it ride at 50 for about 2 1/2 weeks.  Due to the length of fermentation, no diacetyl rest was needed  Then I crashed it to 33 (crashed, not gradual) and will leave it there for maybe 3 days before kegging.

Did this, and my lager came out great, thanks for the help.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Backsweetening Cider
« on: August 24, 2017, 01:08:49 PM »
I've been making cider for the last two years using Lalvin EC1118, which dries it way way out. I ferment about 5.5 gallons, cold crash, put 4.5 gallons into a keg, and then add a half gallon of cider back in. This balances out the dryness of the cider with a little bit more apple flavor. Isn't this possible just with bottling? The natural sugar from the non fermented cider could prime the bottles.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st Lager
« on: July 25, 2017, 09:38:53 PM »
I just finished making a lager with WY2124.  Normally I do the fast schedule and find it works as well as slow, but this time I was going to be out of the country for a while so I just let it ride at 50 for about 2 1/2 weeks.  Due to the length of fermentation, no diacetyl rest was needed  Then I crashed it to 33 (crashed, not gradual) and will leave it there for maybe 3 days before kegging.

Awesome, so it's as simple as chilling down to 50, pitching, waiting, and crashing? Thanks man!

5
General Homebrew Discussion / 1st Lager
« on: July 25, 2017, 05:42:58 PM »
Hello,

Want to make my first lager, now that I have a ferm chamber - but don't want to do it the new 'fast lager method' (going to be gone for two weeks). I don't really trust a lot of the articles on the internet, so I was hoping someone could explain the traditional method. Thinking leave at 50 degrees for 2 weeks, rise to 65 degrees to kick diacetyl, then gradually lower to 38 and cold crash?

Thanks..

6
All Grain Brewing / Bru'n Water - Reverse Osmosis
« on: June 27, 2017, 03:32:26 PM »
Moving to a town with water being sourced from multiple wells, so I've decided to buy a R/O Filter.

Need to ask this - when using Bru'n water, (assuming this R/O filter works as it should) - do I just leave the water input blank? I've never used R/O before and looking forward to it, but also obviously want to make sure it's done correctly.

Thanks.

7
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Insignia Kegerator
« on: June 20, 2017, 04:42:56 PM »
Looks like a house brand unit that is sold under many different brands. I've seen similar units at a similar price point from Sanyo, Danby, and others. Costco has the Danby from time to time.

So if you had the extra couple of hundred dollars would you buy a Kegco instead? That's what I'm leaning towards.

8
Kegging and Bottling / Insignia Kegerator
« on: June 20, 2017, 03:45:51 PM »
Looking for some advice on Kegerators!

Has anyone ever purchased an Insignia Kegerator, such as this;

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/insignia-5-6-cu-ft-2-tap-beverage-cooler-kegerator-stainless-steel/4223500.p?skuId=4223500

Less expensive then most other mid range brands like Kegco or Edgestar, but wasn't sure if it lacks in quality or is just sold at a higher volume out of a place like Bestbuy so they can afford to be cheaper.

Thanks.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water Question
« on: May 25, 2017, 05:55:26 PM »
RO water. Either purchased or your own filter.


Yep. Just my opinion - municipal water supplies can change in mineral makeup throughout the year, so unless you send off to Ward every few months (or are on a well), you don't really know what you're working with. RO water and a cheap TDS meter gives you control.

Thanks for the response - haven't looked into RO water before, is the best option to buy a filter? Any suggestions on something to hook into a garden hose?

10
All Grain Brewing / Water Question
« on: May 25, 2017, 05:06:30 PM »
Hi Guys,

More of a lurker then a poster - but I need some advice.

I'm moving to a town where they only give an annual water report - which is here http://www.wayland.ma.us/Pages/WaylandMA_Water/2015%20CCR%20Report.pdf and also from 2015. And if TLDR, water is sourced from multiple wells so isn't always consistent.

How do I combat this, other then plugging in that report into something like EZ Water Calculator? Because we already put normal tap water through a filter. Will buying something like a carbon filter do the trick? I know it'll vary by style and what Mash PH I want, but I just was looking for some advice on something I know little about.

Any advice is appreciated. Thank you.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Hop Schedule
« on: June 10, 2016, 08:00:12 PM »
Ok, thanks, that helps. I realized that I completely forgot to add in the fact of dry hopping. Which was planning on doing 6-8 oz. Appreciate the info.


And that rate I mentioned would obviously give you an assertive, IPA-like flavor and aroma. I like it. But the intensity of hops I use plays a role in exactly how much I use, too.

To be truthful I'm trying to go after this beer http://www.trilliumbrewing.com/trillium-scaled-way-up-double-ipa/. Which definitely isn't that bitter at all, so trying to keep my IBU's around 60-70 so 2 oz a gallon might be a little too much. So might stick with the 8 oz in the whirlpool, and then dry hop with 8-10 oz.


Thing is, if you use a cool hopstand like I do (170F-ish), the IBUs might calculate in theory but you won't perceive much (if any ) added bitterness. Food for thought.

To be honest, I've never done that before. Tonight might be the right time to try. Do I start chilling right after the boil is over? Chill down to 170-180, toss in the hops, put the lid back on the pot, let sit for 20 minutes, then chill down to pitching temps?


Yeah, chill after flameout, to 175-170F, add your hops and stir thoroughly every few minutes. I go 45 mins for IPA, some go longer. Finish chilling after.

So per this, what is the point of the flameout? If I'm not adding any hops at the end of the boil, can't I just start chilling as soon as I turn the flame off and the boil is over?

Thanks for all the pointers, I'm still relatively new to the hobby.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Hop Schedule
« on: June 10, 2016, 07:33:20 PM »
Ok, thanks, that helps. I realized that I completely forgot to add in the fact of dry hopping. Which was planning on doing 6-8 oz. Appreciate the info.


And that rate I mentioned would obviously give you an assertive, IPA-like flavor and aroma. I like it. But the intensity of hops I use plays a role in exactly how much I use, too.

To be truthful I'm trying to go after this beer http://www.trilliumbrewing.com/trillium-scaled-way-up-double-ipa/. Which definitely isn't that bitter at all, so trying to keep my IBU's around 60-70 so 2 oz a gallon might be a little too much. So might stick with the 8 oz in the whirlpool, and then dry hop with 8-10 oz.


Thing is, if you use a cool hopstand like I do (170F-ish), the IBUs might calculate in theory but you won't perceive much (if any ) added bitterness. Food for thought.

To be honest, I've never done that before. Tonight might be the right time to try. Do I start chilling right after the boil is over? Chill down to 170-180, toss in the hops, put the lid back on the pot, let sit for 20 minutes, then chill down to pitching temps?

13
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Hop Schedule
« on: June 10, 2016, 07:23:24 PM »
Ok, thanks, that helps. I realized that I completely forgot to add in the fact of dry hopping. Which was planning on doing 6-8 oz. Appreciate the info.


And that rate I mentioned would obviously give you an assertive, IPA-like flavor and aroma. I like it. But the intensity of hops I use plays a role in exactly how much I use, too.

To be truthful I'm trying to go after this beer http://www.trilliumbrewing.com/trillium-scaled-way-up-double-ipa/. Which definitely isn't that bitter at all, so trying to keep my IBU's around 60-70 so 2 oz a gallon might be a little too much. So might stick with the 8 oz in the whirlpool, and then dry hop with 8-10 oz.

14
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Hop Schedule
« on: June 10, 2016, 07:10:53 PM »
I can't speak with any authority about NE IPA, but I like that blend of hops. They play well together and won't be 'overcrowded'. I always like dry hops for AIPA though.

Would it be good to do 1 oz per hop at whirlpool and take that extra oz and put it into dryhopping?

Ok, thanks, that helps. I realized that I completely forgot to add in the fact of dry hopping. Which was planning on doing 6-8 oz. Appreciate the info.
As a reference, I use ~ 2 oz/gallon in the whirlpool and an oz/gallon dry in most of my AIPAs. Past that it's personal preference.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: IPA Hop Schedule
« on: June 10, 2016, 06:47:15 PM »
I can't speak with any authority about NE IPA, but I like that blend of hops. They play well together and won't be 'overcrowded'. I always like dry hops for AIPA though.

Would it be good to do 1 oz per hop at whirlpool and take that extra oz and put it into dryhopping?

Pages: [1] 2 3