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Messages - zwiller

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: March 27, 2018, 03:24:55 PM »
Thanks gents.  I will give S189 a shot.  Very interesting looking if you look a data of both strains.  S189 has 1% more attenuation... 

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: March 26, 2018, 07:10:54 PM »
I have switched from 34/70 to S-189 and prefer it in everything. It just seems to have more character to it even though I don't have the issue with 34/70 that others do.

Please tell me it floccs better than 34/70.  Use it in a pils yet? 

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Imperial Independence
« on: March 09, 2018, 09:55:43 PM »
I ran 1272 a few years.  Normal for that strain.  It looks like it will never drop but all of a sudden one day it does...  Dry hop after that.     

4
Took me a while to get my color dialed in but ended up with 50/25/25 wheat/pils/munich.  A little specialty malt can also work as suggested.  Also, 1.045 is little on the low side for me and aim 1.050ish.  On paper it doesn't appear much difference but it is to me. 

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: March 02, 2018, 07:36:38 PM »
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/finished-ph-of-a-pilsner-or-gold-lager.465122/  I don't recall any particular cite just something I picked up from following AJ.  Not gonna dispute that there are 2 systems but you can successfully use one approach for both.   

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: March 02, 2018, 04:03:14 PM »
I repitch pale lagers for at least 15 generations (34/70) and they always finish at pH 4.3, first to last. This has been the case with both treated city water and water built from RO.   Variation in mash and wort pH seems to bear no relation to this consistent final beer pH. MBAA has listed 3.8-4.7 as acceptable pH range for US lager beers, 4.2 average.

My electrode failed before I could test any lagers but that is surprising to me since I generally think lager yeast is a low acid producer.  JT brought it up but basically I am of the opinion that additional acid is typically required to get that low.  There are a few strains that "work" but many do not.  Chico is well known for this and the reason why SN acidifies all their water and mash at 5.1. 

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: March 01, 2018, 05:28:10 PM »
The first thing I did when I went to nearly all cold side measurements was to compare my final pH from my favorite stuff.  I am fanatical about pH and was way off... 

I haven't studied that in my favorite commercial examples. What do you typically find? Homebrew pHs are higher or lower than commercial examples?
Homebrew pH higher.  Sparge pH control is a biggie.  Unless brewed with RO/distilled or acidified sparge you are likely not even in the ballpark. 

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: March 01, 2018, 04:08:14 PM »
EDIT  If we could all give up our OCD, we'd realize BW is so reliable, so well backed up by empirical data, that we should just formulate our recipes with it and leave our meters on the shelf, blissfully freed from the artifacts of our measurement methods. But I can't.
 
Just stop using it in the mash.  While mash pH sets up everything it is FAR from set and forget.  The other phases of the brewing process have significant impact on pH.  The first thing I did when I went to nearly all cold side measurements was to compare my final pH from my favorite stuff.  I am fanatical about pH and was way off...  If you've never done this, do it.  I doubt you will OCD about being off .1 on a mash reading anymore.  ;D

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water pH off
« on: February 28, 2018, 10:03:27 PM »
Tons of variables here including electrode age, last calibration, presence of starch in sample, if it is leap year...  My 2nd meter was used exclusively to gauge accuracy to BNW and it was accurate enough I forgo checking mash/sparge anymore.  3rd meter was used exclusively for pH measurements for mostly cold side (no mash) and lasted ALOT longer... 

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Too much SO4?
« on: February 22, 2018, 05:37:05 PM »
Paper is astringency.  Usually brought on by lack of pH control.  90% time it is lack of sparge acidification unless using RO water.  I dig the SO4 "bite and thickness" and IIRC Martin described it as "crunk".  My IPA's get 300ppm and Terry Foster advocates much higher than that in his ale recipes (650)...  That said, mash and sparge pH is 5.4.  Water treatment is 2 phases.  Proper pH FIRST, then "season to taste".  Alot of guys get it backwards because gypsum can reduce pH (but usually not enough and then acid must be used).  If you have pH dialed in and still have some astringency, you need to look into polyphenol reduction (polyclar) or good old fashioned longer lagering for it to drop naturally.  As a BJCP I am gonna ding you if crunk is missing (save and except for NEIPA)

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: black and tan question
« on: January 19, 2018, 04:08:03 PM »
Apparently, these type of drinks are some what regulated over there since the younger folks tend to overdo it... PMBV sounds pretty good.  I think these names are pretty funny and interesting.  It all started when I read of narfer narfer narf.   

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: black and tan question
« on: January 19, 2018, 02:41:39 PM »
Not heard that one but not surprised either.  Before the craft movement alot folks here called any dark beer bock beer.  Traditional snakebite is half cider half beer.  There is also a stout cider variant that sometimes would have a shot of blackberry liquor too. 

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: black and tan question
« on: January 18, 2018, 10:32:50 PM »
Who cares how it is done... It's for show.  ;D  Real black and tans are mixed.  I did them a long time and came to prefer Murphy's and german lager like Beck's.  Long overdue to fool with snakebites made with stout.

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: Clarifying agents
« on: January 18, 2018, 10:10:52 PM »
While I agree polyclar does strip some hop character, it removes some of the negative attributes of the hops/astringency and not the good stuff.  I find it makes the flavor much more polished or professional.  IBU wise, I doubt it's even 10% or so.  People are surprised but I use it at 10m to KO with WF (brewbrite).  Insane clarity but still struggle a bit with 3470.  Otherwise with typical yeast you would think the beer is filtered.  PVPP is about as close to "perfectly selective" as you can get. 

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Any reason to cold crash a stout?
« on: October 30, 2017, 09:24:15 PM »
The beer is probably ruined.  Best to send it to me for proper disposal.  ;D  Since you are reducing the amount of yeast in the bottle it might slow the carb slightly but I never had good carbonation in 2 weeks like many say.  It was usually about a month before I was happy...  Brew something else and stop worrying about it. 

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