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Messages - JJeffers09

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1
Beer Recipes / Re: Tropical Stout
« on: October 15, 2018, 02:52:06 PM »
Seems like a lot of different specialty malts. Maybe try using fewer next time?

Also, the notes you got back on this beer seem kind of odd. I thought that tropical stouts were not supposed to be overtly roasty, and kind of like Baltic porter they're supposed to be made with dehusked roasted malts?

No, it is specifically sweet fruity strong beer with smooth roasty flavors without a burnt harshness. And I quote - Roasted grain and the malt character can be moderate to high with a smooth offee or chocolate flavor, although the roast character is moderated in the balance by the sweet finish.

As for fewer malts, I also disagree.  Toasty sweet aromas, honey like sweetness, and specialty sugars from the region are all parts to the overall balance to the chocolate and roasted flavors.

2
Beer Recipes / Tropical Stout
« on: October 01, 2018, 06:40:50 PM »
I thought I would share this recipe.  It was a really awesome brew that was very well received, and scored a 37 in competition recently.  Not happy with that score, but no worries.


1.070SG
1.019FG
6.7% ABV
5.6pH
1.55M 2308 at 60F 5days before Drest/cold condition

Water
Calcium - 63
Magnesium 6
Sodium 42
Sulfate 50
Chloride 60
Bicarbonate 168
RA 90
SO4/Cl 0.83

57.6%  M.O.
8.0%    Flaked Oats
6.4%    Caramunich II
6.4%    Honey Malt
4.8%    Chocolate (500)
4.8%    Munich (9)
3.2%    Crystal Extra Dark (127)
2.4%    Roasted (600)
6.4%    Muscovado (Full Boil)

30.6 IBU  Centennial @ 60
8.2 IBU    Centennial @ 15
4.6 IBU    Willamette @ 4

Notes from Judges (very happy with the detail they gave me)
Aroma - Sweet Maltiness, restrained roastiness, low hop aroma, low fruitiness, no off aromas, Perceivable raisin aroma, malt aroma in nutty and slightly coffee, no discernable hop aroma

Appearance - Dark Brown/Dark Ruby, Almost opaque, high head retention with persistent long lasting creamy tan foam

Flavor - Malt flavor is sweet but with a touch of burn character, nice almost sweet alcohol finish, but not a lot of roast flavor, no hop flavor, finish is slightly bitter, balance toward malt that finishes dry

Mouthfeel - Medium Full Body slight warmth, very creamy, not astringent

Overall Impression - Very good beer, but seems to be lacking a strong roasty flavor considering increasing roasted grains or flavors in the grain bill. Very Good.


Overall I think the high pH really masked the roasted perception, I was going for an extremely drinkable beer even though it was going to finish high.  I will say as it ended at 1.019, 1 point above style guide, I really thought the impression was sweetened espresso with a coffee, chocolate, and raisin aroma.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Quest for the Ultimate Traditional Weizen Recipe
« on: August 19, 2018, 09:03:37 AM »
You brilliant SOBs!  Will be enjoying this keg. 
Took a bunch of medals tonight, but need to dedicate one of them to this thread!!!

Well done! Congrats

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4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: June 16, 2018, 12:50:36 PM »
Just hit my first mash step for a Cream Ale Redeaux. I had trouble with the first attempt.


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Who doesnt love a cream ale/kolsch this time of year.  I just kegged my cream ale with 029 10 days ago.

I'm having fun demonstrating an extract brewday at the LHBS today.  Owners Citric Cycle IPA extract kit. Should be a nice day for it.  If anyone in Indy is interested in hanging out.  Swing by Final Gravity homebrew on east Thompson rd, swing by from 10a-1:30p and have a beer with me.  Or heckle me.

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5
Beer Recipes / Re: Quest for the Ultimate Traditional Weizen Recipe
« on: June 14, 2018, 02:17:31 PM »



My target pitchrate is ~0.8M/mL/°P or .4L of fresh slurry in my 10 gallon batches. Obviously shoot for ~200-250mL of fresh slurry for you 5 gallon batches. 

Follow up question: what type of wort aeration are you utilizing, if any? I was concerned about the date and rarely pitch without a starter, but I did hit it for over a minute with pure o2.
I use open fermentation + 5 min with aquarium pump

Wheat yeast is a sensitive to pressure, open fermentation helps develop a lot of yeast character. In my recipe/process development those have been my favorite brews.  Perfect balance is my goal.

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Cool, I have no liquid in the airlock. It is just covered with foil.
I’ve seen a lot of people talk about making an open fermenter by replacing the airlock with foil. I find it hard to believe that the pressure of the airlock makes any significant difference in the pressure at the surface of the beer especially considering the hydrostatic pressure of the beer in the fermenter.

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110% correct.

The reason for the stall is that most of the yeast is trapped in the krausen and not in the wort in the height of fermentation. The krausen will start to then fall and yeast will mix back with the wort. Bubbling an airlock is absolutely nothing.
So beery - question for you, or anyone else to chime in. Now some stairways to heaven amongst others have a channel for krausen/yeast to spill over.  Is that generally getting the mothers out so they dont fall back into the wort leaving the daughters behind? And so on and so forth. Or is that to allow the most o2 exposed to the yeast, low pressure, and an easy cleanup vs Yorkshire squares?  IIRC the open circles are more shallow than squares allowing a better surface area for Weiß.

Not that there really needs to be an answer for those questions, it was just a curious thought from a waist deep enthusiast.

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6



My target pitchrate is ~0.8M/mL/°P or .4L of fresh slurry in my 10 gallon batches. Obviously shoot for ~200-250mL of fresh slurry for you 5 gallon batches. 

Follow up question: what type of wort aeration are you utilizing, if any? I was concerned about the date and rarely pitch without a starter, but I did hit it for over a minute with pure o2.
I use open fermentation + 5 min with aquarium pump

Wheat yeast is a sensitive to pressure, open fermentation helps develop a lot of yeast character. In my recipe/process development those have been my favorite brews.  Perfect balance is my goal.

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7
Hey JT.  Hope all is well with your weissbier.  As a very big fan of the style and it has been my go to brew.  I'm in the ballpark of 90 brewdays of this style alone in the last 3 1/2 years, you could say I'm a little obsessed with the style.  One of the bits of advice I would like to give you making a great starter.  Happy accidents are difficult to repeat.  One of those happy accidents can be from your pitchrate.  Now I'm not talking about just your German wheat beer, obviously you know that's any beer you make.  Taking a dated pack of yeast is really hard to gauge or guess the health of your yeast that way.  Hefe being yeast, this beer all about enjoying a young fresh beer that needs healthy yeast.  It's the brewers choice to decide how much yeast for an estimated hundred billion cells or M/mL/°P.

My target pitchrate is ~0.8M/mL/°P or .4L of fresh slurry in my 10 gallon batches. Obviously shoot for ~200-250mL of fresh slurry for you 5 gallon batches.  It's all trial and error with proper temperature control in your mash schedule and fermentation control to find the balance in esters/phenols.  As discussed thus far in the thread.  Developing the precursors to get the right phenolic character in the acid rest and continuing into the step or infusion mashing is obviously brewers choice.  I hope the info was helpful as it is all a take it or leave it situation! Happy Brewing!

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8
This has gotten away from its purpose of brewing a traditional weissbier, imho

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9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 14, 2018, 12:59:20 PM »


'Pretty Lass' Red ale
1.054 EOG 14.7SRM 5.1% EFG 26.6IBU
In between balanced/bitter amber
83% Blended Base
8% Crystal
4% Melanoiden
4% Honey
1% Black
Willamette
Clarex
WLP085 @ 68F

Interested in what grains you use for your blended base and to learn what you like about 085 compared to other choices, such as the Irish Ale yeast. I hope to brew an Irish Red this spring and every year I tweak things.  I use the Irish Ale malt for the base and last year used Bramling Cross as part of the hop mix--enjoyed it very much but always looking for other ideas.
G.P./M.O. blended base - I usually go for Malting Co Ireland's Irish Ale malt and G.P. and substituted the M.O.
I set out for Irish Ale yeast, LHBS didn't have any.  The Blend was not my 1st choice or my 3rd, it was just a debated idea... funny enough the starter never took off so I drove to another LHBS for Irish ale

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10
Hmm... may want to revisit that hypothesis. Esters come from growth. The access to oxygen keeps a small pitch of yeast in the growth phase longer.


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Esters come from precursors in the mash, that honestly get metabolized and dispelled in the lag phase IIRC, I need a point of reference but I'm in a hotel waiting room.

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11
I thought the same.  Not to be an as what, but this isn't traditional, and tbh neither is my recipe at 60/20/20 dark wheat/munich/pils but it works

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12
The Pub / Re: Margaritas and Whiskey Old Fashioneds...
« on: February 12, 2018, 04:55:51 PM »
Yeah, an old fashioned is very close to being just a diluted version of a perfect Manhattan.  Or conversely, a Manhattan is a very very strong old fashioned.

Ouch, my brain hurts
Rye is king for both cocktails - however an old fashioned is not alcoholic sunny d, it has a hint of orange. Both cocktails are intended to appreciate the whiskey it is made with.  Strong and complex, not sweet. The Manhattan has a lot more dilution than a traditional Old Fashioned.  AKA The great old fashioned debate if you want to dive deeper into that history/argument.

Old Fashioned vs Manhattan

Sugar cube (1 cube only to 2 oz whiskey ) vs sweet vermouth to sweeten (2part whiskey to 1part Vermouth)
Orange peel vs brandied cherry
both share bitters - however historically
Fee brothers bitters vs Angostura
stir poured over a lump of ice vs stirred in a shaker glass full of ice/strained

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 12, 2018, 04:36:58 PM »
Its been awhile since I have posted.  Been homebrewing/experimenting with what little spare time I have.

Just working in a midweek brewday. Irish Red ale up next in the brew log, following with a weissbier and an English IPA for a competition.

'Pretty Lass' Red ale
1.054 EOG 14.7SRM 5.1% EFG 26.6IBU
In between balanced/bitter amber
83% Blended Base
8% Crystal
4% Melanoiden
4% Honey
1% Black
Willamette
Clarex
WLP085 @ 68F

14
Yeast and Fermentation / 1203 Burton Blend
« on: January 29, 2018, 03:43:51 PM »
Going to give this a whirl.  I think I will make a good run on this yeast and see how it behaves from bitter, IPA, brown, porter and stout.

15
I really need new kegging equip and a lagering fridge.

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