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Messages - Pricelessbrewing

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1
Using beersmith you have two variables

1) You need to determine the total amount of water needed.

2) You need to determine the strike temperature for mash 1 using the total amount of water.

3) Efficiency should be roughly equivalent to using all the grain at once, which can be estimated using something like braukaisers lauter efficiency formulas, or my calculator (google my username).


Given the limitations of existing brewing software, no way to add the grains at specific mash steps, I would do the following.

Create recipe 1 with 100% of the grains to determine the total amount of water needed (or use my calculator).

Now remove the amount of grains you plan on using in the second mash, adjust the mash tun losses until you the total amount of water correct as above. You now have the strike temperature, write this down somewhere else, or put it in the note section or something.

Set the efficiency according to what the estimator says (not what beersmith says, because it doesn't care about the efficiency curve that dictates efficiency drops non linearly as OG increases).

Now add the grains back in, you should get a rough idea of the OG.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: efficiency
« on: July 07, 2018, 05:16:29 PM »
I'm glad this is starting to catch on.

If you're having efficiency issues, always determine conversion first. Lauter, and therefore mash/brewhouse will always change with every recipe, but conversion is usually the issue unless you're leaving behind lots of wort of sparging in a bad way.

Conversion should generally be >85%, but typically good conversion occurs in the 90-95% range. Per braukaiser definition, note: brewersfriends formula is incorrect for conversion efficiency.

3
Equipment and Software / Re: BeerSmith 3
« on: June 17, 2018, 11:59:17 PM »
@Oginme Great summary.

More importantly IMO than the whirlpool hop additions and whirlpool temperature being a variable, any existing hop additions performedin the boil will continue to isomerize during the whirlpool. It's still a fudge factor, but there's no more magic going on with a 1 minute boil additions giving 1 IBU when you're going through a 30 minute whirlpool simply because it's not a "whirlpool" addition.

4
I haven't been following all 13 pages very closely, but I'm happy to see you on here now petr, and that there have been translations done.

Is the data you use publicly available anywhere?

Were different yeast types used and categorized? Specifically I'm interested in if the curve is different for diastaticus yeast vs brett vs more common ale or lager yeasts.

5
Equipment and Software / Re: Improved Refractometer Correction calculator
« on: February 26, 2018, 02:20:19 AM »
I have a new set of precision Plato saccharometers arriving tomorrow.   Over time I will try to provide you guys some more data.  Will confirm my correction factor and post any measurements on this thread.

EDIT Perhaps it would be more helpful if I just posted raw data for batches where available:  OG,  mid, and FG  WRI  and saccharometer readings.  Let me know if it would be of any use.

Give me all of the data!

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: BIAB
« on: January 22, 2018, 04:39:30 PM »
For a 1.060 beer I'm at 2.54 qt/lb. Unless you have a ton of mashtun losses, kettle losses, or aren't squeezing, you shouldn't be that high.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: All Grain not reaching projected OG
« on: September 08, 2017, 04:39:03 PM »
Wow, that's really surprising.  In 526 batches I don't think I've ever had one that didn't convert in 60 min.  I've also found water to make a minor difference in efficiency.

While I'm nowhere near 526 batches... I agree, most of my mashes reach full conversion 92-95% usually within ~45 minutes. Water can have a profound impact on conversion, but your almost always notice an off flavor due to the poor mash pH.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long do you cold crash your beer
« on: September 08, 2017, 04:36:57 PM »
At least 2-3 days, but I'm not usually in rush to end cold crashing unless I need to keg it and get the beer flowing.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Decoction mash target temps
« on: September 08, 2017, 03:50:13 PM »
Following for completely unbiased and totally not selfish reasons, to put in my WIP brewing software.

10
http://www.milkthefunk.com/wiki/Lactobacillus

Like the rest of WLP lacto strains, it's a super low cell count (meaning slower souring), and combined with the well knock issues at white labs for their lacto strains, it is not well suited to kettle souring.

Like reverseapachemaster said above, lacto does not produce krausen or ferment more than 1-3 gravity points. If you got more of a SG drop than 3 gravity points, you have yeast in there.

I highly recommend omega yeast labs, the yeast bays lacto blends, goodbelly probiotic yogurty drink thing, or a lacto probiotic pill that contains pure cultures of l. plantarum for kettle souring at 90-95F tops.


11
All Grain Brewing / Re: biab second runnings
« on: July 28, 2017, 02:44:14 AM »
Why would boil-off rate factor into your lauter efficiency?

Boil off rate is a factor for how much total water is being used, which has a direct impact on lauter efficency.

I guess so, although it should be constant. Dead space and absorption are the main players I'd be worried about. Boil off is a passive component in lauter efficiency as opposed to mash losses being active components.

It's still a factor, although the difference is a matter of 0.5-2% lauter efficiency. Mashtun, kettle losses and absorption rate are definitely the big three.

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: biab second runnings
« on: July 28, 2017, 01:29:56 AM »
Assuming typical (ish) boil off rates, no mashtun loss, you should be looking at around 67-70% lauter efficiency (so your remaining grain bed would be approximately ~6.6 lbs of grain), for a no sparge 22lb grain bill with a 0.08 gal/lb grain absorption. If you're not squeezing, then drop that down to ~63% (~8.15 lbs of grain equivalence remaining).

By using lauter efficiency, and equivalent remaining grain, it's easy to throw that amount into a new recipe rather than using a gyle calculator and then a blending calculator and then adding additional new recipe to add onto it. Just remember to adjust your water volume, as the remaining equivalent grain will not absorb additional water (unless you squeezed for first runnings, but won't on this second brew).

Predictions made using my software, which is based on braukaisers model, but much simplified with negligible loss in accuracy 0.02%.

Why would boil-off rate factor into your lauter efficiency?

Boil off rate is a factor for how much total water is being used, which has a direct impact on lauter efficency.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: biab second runnings
« on: July 26, 2017, 06:22:49 PM »
Assuming typical (ish) boil off rates, no mashtun loss, you should be looking at around 67-70% lauter efficiency (so your remaining grain bed would be approximately ~6.6 lbs of grain), for a no sparge 22lb grain bill with a 0.08 gal/lb grain absorption. If you're not squeezing, then drop that down to ~63% (~8.15 lbs of grain equivalence remaining).

By using lauter efficiency, and equivalent remaining grain, it's easy to throw that amount into a new recipe rather than using a gyle calculator and then a blending calculator and then adding additional new recipe to add onto it. Just remember to adjust your water volume, as the remaining equivalent grain will not absorb additional water (unless you squeezed for first runnings, but won't on this second brew).

Predictions made using my software, which is based on braukaisers model, but much simplified with negligible loss in accuracy 0.02%.

14
One of the interesting things that Bryan has turned me on to in the recent months is tracking the percentage of extract you get after each rest. We use an adapted form of Kai's first wort gravity chart in our spreadsheets and we have shown that for 100% conversion we nail that gravity consistently.

What does that mean? Well we know that we can expect 100% of the available first wort extract at the end of our mash. Since we are using no-sparge, that turns out to be our pre-boil gravity. In order to track extract across the mash, you simply take gravity readings with your refractometer after each rest. What you'll see is the progression of available extract for a certain temperature and time.

This is exactly what I did as well when I wanted to test my conversion rate (conversion efficiency vs time).

15
I'm very happy you've kept making progress in what's needed and what was "LODO dogma" has simplified and clarified from the original "mandate" statements if you will. Keep up the good work, and I'm sure it will continue gaining ground as more explore what is needed.

 I'm not ready to start doing it quite yet, but I'm more open minded to the idea of it now, due in part to the approaches and statements made by some brewers I respect that are unrelated to the LODO team. Maybe after I move again and have an established brew station

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