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Messages - Richard

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1
I took a gravity sample and within minutes all the krausen dropped. Gravity was right where I expected it to be, racked to secondary. Sample tasted good.

It sounds like you dislodged the "pancake" when you took the gravity reading, and once detached it all fell down.

2
The Pub / Re: The Brewer Who Quit Drinking Beer
« on: September 11, 2018, 11:09:29 PM »
Thanks for posting. Home brewing  is a wonderful hobby. But, it does involve alcohol. Which can be problematic if we don't exercise discipline. it's always good to occasionally evaluate your consumption. just my 2 cents.

Exercising discipline is important, and disciplined exercising is equally important.

3
Yeah, WY1469 is the one that I got the "pancake" with.

4
Shake it up gently, then cold crash. I asked on this forum once about a persistent layer of "gooey" krausen and was told it was a "pancake". It was held in place by sticking to the edges of the carboy and then sticking to itself all the way across. Once I agitated it enough to break it loose from the walls, it separated into rafts and they sank  readily.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What is Canned Wort? And How is it used?
« on: September 11, 2018, 04:40:09 PM »
I prepare my starter the morning of brew day and pitch it to my chilled beer wort that evening (or when I'm done brewing) basically about 8 hours later. I dont know how much growth I'm getting, but I look at it as shaving 8hrs off my "lag time" by having my yeast pitch at exponential growth phase when I pitch them.

I did that for my last batch and didn't notice any reduction in lag time. I prepared the starter (1 pack White Labs yeast into 1 liter canned wort in a 1 gallon container, shaken vigorously) around 7 AM and pitched it around 3 PM. Next time I think I will start it the night before to give it more time to reach high krausen.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Just not what I was expecting to find...
« on: September 04, 2018, 02:39:32 AM »
I don't keg, so I don't have CO2. The only pressurized gas cylinders I have are oxygen and propane.

Actualy, I do have pressurized CO2 but it is in a Sodastream cylinder and doesn't have fittings that allow for more general-purpose use.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Just not what I was expecting to find...
« on: September 03, 2018, 11:37:39 PM »
Flushing with gas seemed to me to be an expensive waste of good oxygen, so I tried my bicycle floor pump (Schrader end) and found that it worked quite well! It is a bit awkward to hold the stone on the end of the hose with one hand while pumping with the other, but it once set up it pumps a good volume of air through the stone in a jiffy.

8
Equipment and Software / Re: Passivating New Stainless Steel
« on: August 29, 2018, 02:00:17 AM »
Yes, BKF is great for cleaning electric heating coils that have burnt on residue (I know from personal experience), but that has nothing to do with passivation. Let me repeat what I said above:

Passivation is to prevent rust. If you don't have any rust then you don't need to passivate. It is that simple.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Styles of beer
« on: August 24, 2018, 04:06:57 PM »
From the 2015 BJCP guidelines, the overall impressions for these three are:
9C) A Baltic Porter often has the malt
flavors reminiscent of an English porter and the restrained
roast of a schwarzbier, but with a higher OG and alcohol
content than either. Very complex, with multi-layered malt and
dark fruit flavors.
13C)A moderate-strength brown beer with a
restrained roasty character and bitterness. May have a range of
roasted flavors, generally without burnt qualities, and often has
a chocolate-caramel-malty profile.
20A) Overall Impression: A substantial, malty dark beer with a
complex and flavorful dark malt character.

The style guidelines are here: https://www.bjcp.org/stylecenter.php

10
Equipment and Software / Re: Passivating New Stainless Steel
« on: August 23, 2018, 09:54:38 PM »
Passivation produces an oxide layer that prevents rust - that is what makes it "stainless" steel (the German name is rostfrei or rust-free). Newly manufactured items need passivation because the machining and welding can damage the oxide layer. The manufacturer should do this. In normal use, if you don't see any rust then you don't need to passivate.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Opinions on piney/ Earthy IPA recipe
« on: August 23, 2018, 05:03:26 PM »
I agree with the posters who say that the Willamette will get lost. That is a lot of Simcoe and it is pretty strong stuff. I also think that dry hopping for more than 4-5 days doesn't add anything good.

12
I looked at the recipe. Fuggles? Really, Jim? There are some people who say they don't like Fuggles...

13
Calculate acid for total grain in total water. Then calculate acid needed for half the grain in total water. If total acid needed is 3ml, and the first mash needs 1ml, then the 2nd mash gets the remaining 2ml. It's just that easy.

Maybe my water is different than yours, but that doesn't work for me. I have alkaline water and need the acid in the grain to bring down the pH. If I add half the grain to the total water I need MORE acid to hit the right pH than if I add all the grain, so my first mash needs more acid than the second. In the couple of examples I looked at there is not a lot of difference between the two, though, so I figure that if I get the pH right for the first mash it should be good enough for the second.
When I split the grain bill the dark malt is going in the first mash.

Aaah, yes, that would to if, especially for a stout. I don't remember that being mentioned in the podcast.

14
Calculate acid for total grain in total water. Then calculate acid needed for half the grain in total water. If total acid needed is 3ml, and the first mash needs 1ml, then the 2nd mash gets the remaining 2ml. It's just that easy.

Maybe my water is different than yours, but that doesn't work for me. I have alkaline water and need the acid in the grain to bring down the pH. If I add half the grain to the total water I need MORE acid to hit the right pH than if I add all the grain, so my first mash needs more acid than the second. In the couple of examples I looked at there is not a lot of difference between the two, though, so I figure that if I get the pH right for the first mash it should be good enough for the second.

15
Thanks for the discussion, Jim. It has gotten me thinking about a similar procedure.

I do electric BAIB in a 10-gallon kettle, and that won't hold enough for a high-gravity beer so I often add some DME to kick up the OG. Instead I could do a low-temperature (145 - 150) mash with just base malt, then pull the grains and raise the temperature (or vice-versa) and add a second batch of grains for another mash. Using this technique I could do it all with grain, and the strike temperature calculations are easy for both stages. It means a longer mash, but the first one would proceed pretty quickly and could probably be stopped after 20-30 mins. One downside is that calculating pH for the second mash is a bit tricky  (this is true for the reiterated mash, too). I need to think about that some more. Maybe Martin can help if he sees this.

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