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Messages - kaitiura

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is a good, low ABV IPA possible?
« on: June 27, 2010, 07:58:18 AM »
That's kinda where I was going. There are standards, but I've always looked at them as things to be considered when coming up with your own idea ;) But I have to bow to the knowledge and experience of far better brewers in things technical. I think the bottom line is that if a product comes to pass that will satisfy in place of our favorites, or those close, then we should accept it. My question comes from an open mind and, frankly, ignorance.

A hoppy beer is what I prefer :o and recipes can be tweaked, I just don't want to get nutty if there's something inherently wrong with our proposed direction. Thanks to the sage advice given so far, I assume the risk can be taken and the results addressed according to taste without fear of total disaster from the outset.

Great advice, and much appreciated! :) :) :)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is a good, low ABV IPA possible?
« on: June 26, 2010, 09:39:25 PM »
Fred;
Thanks so much for your input. I will pass this along to my friend and we'll give it a try. I (we) appreciate your help immensely! :)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Is a good, low ABV IPA possible?
« on: June 26, 2010, 07:35:09 PM »
Thanks for the quick response, Dave! I've drunk many American Pale Ales but a true IPA or Double IPA is a different monster, yeah? Jason's looking, I think, to show some moxy against "the world's greatest beer", Pliny (according to Zymurgy this month...) which is about my favorite and which will require hops aplenty. Our dilemma is that we are in such close proximity to RRBC and Pliny, plus we've 'grown up' on Pliny as have all our friends... he'll need to supply something that will, at the very least, suffice in place of all the great beers nearby. So we're talking a true IPA/Double IPA if that's possible.

I'm very limited as a brewer, so I'll take any enlightenment you can offer. If you're sure the American Pale Ale could be tweaked, I'll gladly give it a shot, but I've read many posts where people doubt a ABV lower than 5% could really stand up to big hopping. You say it can? How would you go about it, if you don't mind sharing? Thanks! ::)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Is a good, low ABV IPA possible?
« on: June 26, 2010, 07:04:59 PM »
I've been asked by a friend who wants to open an establishment that would offer good, low ABV IPAs for those who don't want or can't handle the big percentages most IPAs and Double IPAs have.

We live in Santa Rosa, CA, and have been regulars at Vinnie Cilurzo's Russian River Brewing Company since it opened, drinking more Pliny than should be allowed by law, which is kinda where this idea comes from; no one wants to try to compete with Vinnie, but a place with lower alcohol-content beers has a draw for many reasons.

But in reading up on low ABV IPA attempts, it seems a standard concern that anything below 5% won't want to stand up to big hopping. Does anyone have experience in making a true IPA (or close) or (why not wish for the stars?) Double IPA with a 4.5%-5% ABV? ???

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Third transfer fermentaion-add more yeast?
« on: December 10, 2009, 06:00:02 PM »
Shouldn't be any problem drinking it fast! ;) It IS a Pliny wanna-be, with HUGE hops, so it'll live through a little suffering, but any deterioration is bad!

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Third transfer fermentaion-add more yeast?
« on: December 08, 2009, 12:23:50 PM »
I can see a case where you might want to have a seocndary for dry hopping (though, in reality you can dry hop in the primary.) Hard for me to come up with a reason for a trimary fermenter in almost any case. And no way should you be straining your beer through cheese cloth. That is a very good way to oxidize your beer.

Next time, just let the beer sit in the primary or secondary and carefully transfer the beer off once the hops have settled - or simply use a hop sock. And save the cheese cloth for .... well ... cheese, I guess. ;)
I really appreciate all the great info you all are providing. I knew the cloth was risky, and we'll see if I blew it, but the beer won't have much time to sit around once it's bottled, so that may help a bit.
After some good info from blatz, I may try to hunt down a used SS conical and upgrade my process.

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Third transfer fermentaion-add more yeast?
« on: December 08, 2009, 12:20:59 PM »
Your only issue would be oxidiation resulting from exposure during the transfers.

Fred
Roger that, Fred! See below, and thanks!
Kai

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Third transfer fermentaion-add more yeast?
« on: December 08, 2009, 12:18:48 PM »
How did you run it through a cheese cloth?  I thought of oxidation problems as well when you mentioned that.
I boiled the cheesecloth a little to sanitize, then stuffed it into the mouth of the carboy on transfer. I know, it sounds risky, and probably is! I won't do it again, but had a HUGE amount of hops left in the carboy after a dry hopping with extra hops to emulate Pliny the Elder and figured I'd try it. Came out clean, but the amount of air that got into the beer was huge... :-[

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Yeast and Fermentation / Third transfer fermentaion-add more yeast?
« on: December 08, 2009, 11:09:47 AM »
[I apologize, being new here, if this has been endlessly addressed in these forums!]

I've just transferred my beer to a third fermentation carboy to help with removing an extra-heavy dry-hop application ;), running it through a sterilized cheesecloth on transfer. I'm not a regular brewer and am wondering if I may have screwed myself by removing the solids, maybe losing too much of my yeast when I did that :-\. Do I need to add more yeast when I bottle or will there be enough left in the beer. Secondary fermentation ran for one week and three days after one week of primary. Almost all solids were filtered out on the third transfer. Thanks for any info!

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