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Messages - Robert

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1
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: Today at 03:38:08 AM »
So the more I read the worse this looks.  The "study" I mean.  Not only did they set out to find exactly what they did -- a probability that beer will get scarce and expensive  -- all hoping to scare people in rich and influential countries into taking action on climate change, but: They are also under the impression that Ireland and the Czech Republic are rich and influential countries.   

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pump or Gravity Stand?
« on: Today at 12:21:47 AM »
I also have two deer hoists that I use for pulling BIAB basket from mash tun and pulling fermenters in and out of the freezer chest.  I will add a third when cornie kegs become too much for me.  So mechanical advantage makes my life much easier.
I like that.

3
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: Today at 12:20:30 AM »
I'm banking on the premise that there will always be enough beer to satisfy the people still alive.
Agreed. History shows that this is the case.
Especially if we start stockpiling beer and eliminating the competition now... It's the beerpocalypse!

4
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: October 15, 2018, 11:42:49 PM »
I read about this report in the NYT.  The motivation behind the study was basically to illustrate that not only will the obvious poor people in poor countries be displaced and otherwise affected, but that even the "haves" will be affected,  by, e. g., this impending  beer crisis. (Tell them their beer is going away, you've got their attention.)  The researchers coined a term I kind of like for the likes of beer, and coffee, and other such products likely to be affected similarly:  "luxury essentials."  Meaning, you don't really need them to survive, but if you're rich enough to live in the developed world,  you really do need them. 

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pump or Gravity Stand?
« on: October 15, 2018, 10:11:59 PM »
I have everything on one level and, similarly to RC, use a pitcher for transfers.  LT drains by gravity to a pitcher or pail as a "grant" and I only lift a bit at a time to the kettle.  I've always done it like this, but appreciate it more as I need to lift less.  Ain't fancy, but it also avoids the PITA factors mentioned.   Unfortunately, there is no pump available to alleviate the need to lift sacks of grain, kegs in and out of the keezer... Maybe Denny will have some workarounds for these kinds of operations, too.   :)

6
The Pub / Re: The future has never seemed more bleak
« on: October 15, 2018, 09:57:35 PM »
Yeah, my yields will be down by then too.  But.

There should be plenty of good malting barley from Greenland by then at least.   And hops!  Think how ideal the daylight hours are there in season...

Sorry for the gallows humor. 

I have occasionally mused about how much CO2 brewing produces, from fermentation as well as energy production, and what some future, low-carbon brewing might be like.  I imagine something mashed (can't help it) but not boiled (like original Berliner Weiße) would save energy.  Yeasts that require no temperature control.   Everything old new again.  Or maybe entirely new processes will be developed to reduce the energy demands of mashing, boiling and fermentation (some are already being kicked around.)  But.  Still need agricultural products in the first place.

Drink 'em if you got 'em.

(I'm really depressed and need a beer now.)

7
Ingredients / Re: Unfermentable lactose
« on: October 15, 2018, 01:18:47 AM »
And I thank you, Bama, for that link.  It's an extremely well thought out recipe I might put to use.  I'm anxiously awaiting the limited annual release of Great Lakes Ohio City Oatmeal Stout.   It's one of their best beers, should be year round, and they really treat it like  an afterthought.   I'll be stocking up while everyone else fights over cases of Christmas Ale.  That recipe might be even tastier.

8
Ingredients / Re: Unfermentable lactose
« on: October 15, 2018, 12:24:32 AM »
First thing I see is no roasted barley. Of course that has nothing to do with low efficiency but normally stout has it ...but it’s your beer and you can certainly brew it the way to want. Here’s a pretty good article on Oatmeal Stout: https://beerandbrewing.com/make-your-best-oatmeal-stout/  of course it’s just one way to go but it gives reasoning.


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Actually, reading tons of Ron Pattinson's historic porter and stout recipes lately, I've only found a couple that use roasted barley; they usually used pale malt with a limited percentage of some combination of amber, brown, black, crystal, and sugars.   He also says the "oatmeal" versions generally used oats at less than 0.5% --  because then they could brew just one beer and, perfectly legally, sell some of it as porter or stout and some as oatmeal stout!   (How advertising image influences your sensory perception:  discuss.) So really, you can formulate your recipe any way you like; the modern guidelines and conventions have little to do with beers just a half century ago, but are well established in their own right,  and it's your beer anyway.  These styles seem open to a wide range  of interpretation,  unless you're trying to meet comp specs.  (It seems the raw barley only got into Guinness in the 1980s.)

(The only recipe I can lay my hands on right now using roasted barley is a porter, not a stout!  So much for that distinction.)

9
Ingredients / Re: Unfermentable lactose
« on: October 14, 2018, 08:08:58 PM »
Yep, lactose will add to your OG like any sugar, just won't ferment.  If you think your OG doesn't reflect the addition,  are you sure it's completely dissolved and mixed in,  and not sitting on the bottom when you take your sample?  Ten minutes should do it, but... it's a thought.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 06:44:48 PM »
I believe the yeast did exactly what it was bred to do. S-04 does not process maltotriose so it leaves undigestible sugars therefore leaves the gravity ‘high’. You have to plan for high FG when using this yeast.


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True.  They list it as "highly attenuative" but I find with typical worts mashed around 150°, 70% is about what you can actually expect.  A high mash temperature would bring this down significantly.   Check that thermometer.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 06:41:30 PM »




But higher temps would encourage fermentation, not hinder it.  Unless your fermentation got to over 115F.
Well, some yeasts are sensitive to temperatures lower than 115°, some will crap out at 90°, but ambient the 70s is just going to get you to fermentation temperatures that give off flavors,  not dead yeast.  The point is spot on that you should have seen accelerated a activity.  I don't think it's a yeast issue here.  But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

Hey, Rob, for my own edification what yeasts crap out at 90F?
I think pretty much any lager yeast will stop at 90° but I'm being a bit pedantic there I guess.  Nobody's likely to be in that situation, except maybe in propagation.  Which would then stop being propagation.   I don't know if any ale strains would shut down before they're dead.  But not many will make beer you want to drink under those conditions. Sorry to distract.

(One old test to differentiate ale and lager yeast was to incubate them at 90°, and if they didn't die, they were ale yeast!)

OK, now I'm gonna be guilty of diversion...I'm not aware of any lager strain that will shut down at 90F.  But that's exact;y what I mean...I'm not aware.  I'll see if I can get any info from my friends at Wyeast.  I'll also see Chris White in Australia in a couple weeks and I'll try to remember to ask him.
Chris has a paragraph or two on it in his book with Jamil.  If anybody knows about lager and heat it would be an actual Australian.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 05:59:25 PM »



But higher temps would encourage fermentation, not hinder it.  Unless your fermentation got to over 115F.
Well, some yeasts are sensitive to temperatures lower than 115°, some will crap out at 90°, but ambient the 70s is just going to get you to fermentation temperatures that give off flavors,  not dead yeast.  The point is spot on that you should have seen accelerated a activity.  I don't think it's a yeast issue here.  But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

Hey, Rob, for my own edification what yeasts crap out at 90F?
I think pretty much any lager yeast will stop at 90° but I'm being a bit pedantic there I guess.  Nobody's likely to be in that situation, except maybe in propagation.  Which would then stop being propagation.   I don't know if any ale strains would shut down before they're dead.  But not many will make beer you want to drink under those conditions. Sorry to distract.

(One old test to differentiate ale and lager yeast was to incubate them at 90°, and if they didn't die, they were ale yeast!)

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 04:42:59 PM »



But higher temps would encourage fermentation, not hinder it.  Unless your fermentation got to over 115F.
Well, some yeasts are sensitive to temperatures lower than 115°, some will crap out at 90°, but ambient the 70s is just going to get you to fermentation temperatures that give off flavors,  not dead yeast.  The point is spot on that you should have seen accelerated a activity.  I don't think it's a yeast issue here.  But temperature control is still one of the most valuable additions you can make to your brewery.  Should come before all the other bells and whistles.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Troubleshooting Final Gravity
« on: October 14, 2018, 03:49:28 PM »
I wouldn't immediately guess that the yeast is a problem.   The manufacturer's recommendation is to direct pitch this yeast dry.  I've done so and watched it rip right through fermentations in three days. At your ambient temperatures, the ferment would have been at least in the upper 70s, maybe low 80s, higher than ideal but not high enough to kill the yeast off.  You might have overshot the mash temperature a bit (you say the thermometer was not great.)  With a high mash temperature and some crystal and roast, you might have actually reached the attenuation limit of your wort.  You could test this idea by calibrating your thermometer:   check it by placing it in the stream of steam coming from a tea kettle, and in crushed ice.  While you're at it, calibrate your hydrometer, too:  in distilled water at the temperature marked on the stem (usually 60°F,) it should read 1.000.  If either instrument is off, you'll know by how much and you can compensate in your future readings.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Hydra wort chillers
« on: October 14, 2018, 12:51:41 AM »
I take less than 1/3 as long with the Hydra as I did with my old 25' SS immersion chiller.  It's pretty slick, though it plugs up like a bastard when using whole cone hops.  I'm still getting the damned thigns out of it.
Are you pushing wort or water through the inside of the Hydra?

Sounds like wort, huh?
I’ve always put the chiller in the kettle with the wort and run ground water through the chiller. Seems much easier to sanitize up front and clean after.
Aw,  you're probably one of those boring guys who put their underwear and socks on first and then their pants and shoes.

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