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Messages - beersk

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I'm gonna brew a Vienna lager this weekend. Thinking going full Low DO with Brewtan B this time. Base is going to be all Vienna, with 8oz of carahell and a couple ounces of dehusked carafaIII for color.

That makes my mouth water. Will be perfect for early autumn days.
I know. I did a low DO all Vienna pale ale with chinook and simcoe, kegged it 2 gravity points before it was finished. It's the best beer I've ever brewed. So fresh and amazing and I love the Vienna malt in a pale ale. I'm wanting to try more all Vienna malt beers.

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I'm gonna brew a Vienna lager this weekend. Thinking going full Low DO with Brewtan B this time. Base is going to be all Vienna, with 8oz of carahell and a couple ounces of dehusked carafaIII for color.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 30m boil help
« on: August 25, 2016, 11:13:30 AM »
I think what he meant to say was heat stress rather than oxidation.

Heat stress?  Tell me more!
What Sam said, and Brewing Network had a podcast on it, too. http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/brew-strong-thermal-load/

Basically, boiling long and hard cause stress which compromises beer stability and adds unwanted color to the wort. Coupled with oxidation reactions, beer stability and freshness is greatly compromised. I've been boiling at what looks like a simmer, maybe a tad more than a simmer for 45 minutes. I like it.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 30m boil help
« on: August 25, 2016, 09:42:21 AM »
The goal of the 30m boil was simply to save time.  I was hoping the resulting beer would basically be the same as a 60m boil.  IBUs were adjusted etc.  IIRC there is a mention in the LODO article that a shorter or less intense boil could contribute to less oxidation/more "it".  I wonder if there could be some merit to this now.  The maltiness is more in the aroma but it is still in the flavor too.  Very munich malt-ish.  The recipe and yeast was basically the same as I've done for the last few years except a 30m boil.  70/20/10 2 row/wheat malt/sugar.  That said, could be just a one off thing.  Honestly, I don't want in my saison.

Waiddaminnit.....boiling drives off O2 doesn't it?  How could boiling increase oxidation?
I think what he meant to say was heat stress rather than oxidation.

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Quote
                                                                                                                                          I know that's right, I was stationed in West Germany in the mid 80's and lived off Post with my family. There  was a beer truck that came around delivering beer to your doorstep by the case just like the Milkman, if your old enough to remember that. They would leave a card to select the beers you wanted and pick up the empties. I had the time of my life.   Prost!
Wow, I bet. That's cool!

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Didn't PETA propose something creepy like that?  I think it was breast milk ice cream.
*shudders*

7
Making a Breakfast Milk Porter (?).  Someone I work with told me I should make something like that, so who am I to argue. 

4.5 lb    Maris Otter Pale (UK)   
0.75 lb    Rye (DE)   
0.75 lb    Crystal 45L (UK)
0.5 lb    Flaked Oats
0.5 lb    Pale Chocolate (UK)   
6.5 oz    Lactose (Milk Sugar)
3.2 oz    Roasted Barley
3.2 oz    De-Husked Caraf III
2.5 oz    Extra Dark Crystal 120L    

Doing a lot to try to build body and flavor and keep the ABV around 3.8%.  This is a first swing at it, so I'll adjust based on what this turns out like.  Fermenting with 1728 (was going to use 1968 but someone got to the last one at the shop 20 minutes before me).


I read that as "breast milk porter" at first lol

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: kolsch grain bill
« on: August 18, 2016, 02:38:40 PM »
Yeeeeeeeaaaaahhhhh, Jon knows what's up.

I don't understand the wheat thing in Kolsch. Nix it.

Here's my recent Kolsch recipe, turned out preeeeetty deece.

8 lbs 8.0 oz Pilsner - Barke (2.0 SRM) Grain 95.77 %
6.0 oz Carahell (10.0 SRM) Grain 4.23 %
0.50 oz Magnum [12.00 %] (60 min) (First Wort Hop) Hops 28.1 IBU
0.50 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (30 min) Hops 2.9 IBU
0.75 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (15 min) Hops 2.3 IBU
0.75 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (5 min) Hops 1.4 IBU
1 Pkgs German Ale (Wyeast Labs #1007)

How does the bitterness/hop character come across on that guy? Seems a bit high for a kolsch. Looks delish regardless.
You're right, it's a tad high, but it works, I think. I'm betting Jon's kolsch is better.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: kolsch grain bill
« on: August 17, 2016, 04:55:19 PM »
Yeeeeeeeaaaaahhhhh, Jon knows what's up.

I don't understand the wheat thing in Kolsch. Nix it.

Here's my recent Kolsch recipe, turned out preeeeetty deece.

8 lbs 8.0 oz Pilsner - Barke (2.0 SRM) Grain 95.77 %
6.0 oz Carahell (10.0 SRM) Grain 4.23 %
0.50 oz Magnum [12.00 %] (60 min) (First Wort Hop) Hops 28.1 IBU
0.50 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (30 min) Hops 2.9 IBU
0.75 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (15 min) Hops 2.3 IBU
0.75 oz Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [2.70 %] (5 min) Hops 1.4 IBU
1 Pkgs German Ale (Wyeast Labs #1007)

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: Resume boil a week later
« on: August 17, 2016, 08:23:56 AM »
OP, you should've just added all your hops when the burner went out and let sit for 30 minutes. A 30 minute boil was sufficient to begin with.
I'd scrap the wort...

11
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: August 15, 2016, 05:08:07 PM »
Posted this in the "What's brewing this weekend" thread:

I am planning to rack it to a keg when it's a few points from expected final gravity though. I've been noticing major improvements from doing that alone.
Are you actually measuring the gravity or just guessing? If guessing, what visual clue do you use to know when to transfer?

At about a week, I check the gravity or if I notice there's no more airlock activity. I keep an eye on the activity everyday. When I see no more activity I know it's pretty close to being time for transferring. Also doing a FFT. Did that on my oktoberfest. FFT finished at 1.010, kegged at 1.014 after 7 days and it finished at 1.010. I'm not using a spunding valve either, so when I go to take a sample for FG, it blasts out of there. I figure if I can transfer it within 2-4 points from being done, I'm golden.

While the beer sits for an additional week are you allowing it to warm up to room temps to further attenuate and clean up any fermentation byproducts (diacetyl?) at this point? 

This is a cool idea, and potentially well worth giving a shot in addition to my closed transfers I do. I would guess you have to be pretty familiar with the recipe and yeast to make this work effectively and repeatedly.
True, being familiar with the recipe and yeast definitely helps. But if you're within a couple points of your FG, than it's still fine I think. If you know when your beer is usually done, you can subtract about a day and transfer then, with some yeast. And if you do closed transfers, I think that'll ward off any O2 pickup/oxidation altogether. It's a marvelous method. I just assume, like anything else, it takes a bit of practice and attention.

12
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: August 15, 2016, 09:43:28 AM »
Jon, not that I've noticed it doesn't seem to be over carbonating. It's definitely not a permanent change but I'm trying it out for now and it seems to be working.


I've been kegging with ascorbic acid the last few batches, to (hopefully) help reduce kegging oxidation. I may try what you're doing at some point, to see if I can see a difference.
Post your thoughts on it if you remember.

I know this way is great, but definitely takes a bit of care; you have to pay pretty close attention to fermentation.

13
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: August 15, 2016, 05:37:28 AM »
Jon, not that I've noticed it doesn't seem to be over carbonating. It's definitely not a permanent change but I'm trying it out for now and it seems to be working.

Tommy, I've been carrying yeast over to the keg when I transfer and it sits in the keg for an additional week to finish out. There shouldn't be anything different about it versus leaving it in the fermenter for another week. The yeast are still active.

At some point I plan to get a SS Brewtech brew bucket so I can do closed transfers...worry a bit less about O2 pick up. But still, doing it this way is basically a surefire way to have basically zero oxidation in the finished beer.

14
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B
« on: August 14, 2016, 01:45:59 PM »
Posted this in the "What's brewing this weekend" thread:

I am planning to rack it to a keg when it's a few points from expected final gravity though. I've been noticing major improvements from doing that alone.
Are you actually measuring the gravity or just guessing? If guessing, what visual clue do you use to know when to transfer?

At about a week, I check the gravity or if I notice there's no more airlock activity. I keep an eye on the activity everyday. When I see no more activity I know it's pretty close to being time for transferring. Also doing a FFT. Did that on my oktoberfest. FFT finished at 1.010, kegged at 1.014 after 7 days and it finished at 1.010. I'm not using a spunding valve either, so when I go to take a sample for FG, it blasts out of there. I figure if I can transfer it within 2-4 points from being done, I'm golden.

15
Hoppy Lager today for me. Recently, I bought 10 lbs. Briess 2-row Brewers Malt. I made 2 batches. Both batches had efficiency 71-72% versus my normal efficiency 78-80%. Is this normal for Briess Brewers Malt?

Not as far as I know. But it's not a particularly good malt either.





Looking forward to it as well, Jon.

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