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Messages - kramerog

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Bru'n Water results - cation anion difference
« on: April 19, 2018, 07:20:44 PM »
It looks like the data is correctly entered.  There is some phosphorous that is not accounted for in Bru'n Water.  Doing some quick calcs and assuming that phosphorous corresponds to HPO3--, the phosphorous only accounts for ~ 0.02 meq/l of extra anion.  So what is left is analytical error and other substances that are not tested for.

My educated guess is that the discrepancy does not matter much for purposes of calculating your mash pH and for sparge adjustments (probably no reason to adjust due to near zero residual alkalinity).  To me, the bigger issue is that your water apparently comes from a surface source whose mineral content varies based on the weather.  The water looks good now, but might not be during a drought.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: NEIPA Water Profile
« on: April 16, 2018, 02:11:32 PM »
Hi everyone,

I brewed my first NEIPA starting with RO water and the result doesn't live up to my expectations. Even though this beer is by far the fruitiest I ever brewed, there is a disturbing taste/mouthfeel to it which I already experienced in some NEIPA commercial examples.

I started with RO water and added 0.44 g epsom salt per gal (7 Grams for 60L) and 0.82 calcium chloride per gal (13 Grams for 60L) and obtained this profile:

Ca+2 Mg+2 Na+ Cl- SO4-2 HCO
59.1 11.5 0.0 104.5 45.5 0.000

As it tastes strange, I'm thinking about correcting it with 0.38 G Gypsum per Gal, 0.13 G of table salt per Gal and 0.13 G more of calcium chloride per Gal to reach this profile:

Ca+2 Mg+2 Na+ Cl- SO4-2 HCO
91.4 11.5 13.1 140.8 101.2 0.000

Any thougts on what I'm planing to do? Does it make sense or should I be a bit more conservative? I could also go with just a bit of gypsum to raise the sulfate level (and the calcium level but I've read it has little effect on taste) and forget about the sodium and the extra calcium chloride.

Thanks!
 

In future batches, I would drop the magnesium.  I just don't see the benefit of using epsom salts when gypsum is tried and true and you are using gypsum anyway.

In this batch, I would just add more gypsum.  This recommendation has more to do with an experimental approach of making only one change at a time.  If you add 3 different salts, how are you to know what worked or didn't work?  It seems that you have a lot of this beer, 60L, perhaps 3 cornies?  You could do different things with different cornies, but I'd start with the gypsum and see how that goes first.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Modern Times Fraxos Recipe Formulation
« on: April 15, 2018, 03:18:41 PM »
Your FG should decrease if you lower the amount of crystal, but of course BS is just making a ball park estimate.

NEIPAs have a lot of sulfate and chloride at levels higher than most brewers are used to. Scott Janish's blog (google it)  has a lot of good info on making NEIPAs. 

Most of your hops should be used in a hopstand and in one or 2 dryhop additions.  The first dry hop would be at the tail end of the active fermentation and the second in the keg.  You might need 1/2 -1 ounce of hops in a bittering addition.  Apart from the bittering addition, I would keep the ratio of hops in the various additions constant.

4
A friend brought beer a flat single barrel lambic (or was it gueuze?) from Belgium in a wine-in-a-box bladder.  I could see why sour beers are often blended.  Like homoeccentricus said, would be easy to add fruit or blend in a younger sour.

5
Beer Recipes / Re: Australian Sparkling
« on: April 13, 2018, 06:04:00 PM »
Zymurgy also had an article.  I was considering make this beer using the dregs of the original, but I tasted the original and decided not to clone at all.

6
Beer Recipes / Re: Brew Guru Recipe
« on: April 09, 2018, 08:34:32 PM »
What the other guys said is correct.  I just want to add that sometimes people get a higher OG than expected without taking into account that they got a smaller volume than expected.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: time managment
« on: April 05, 2018, 07:27:57 PM »
Yes, but you may want to get the wort to 170 F to denature any enzymes before you go or do a mash out step.

8
Without delving into the actual calculations, assuming the water analysis analyzed for all the significant ions, there are equivalent amounts of anions (Ca++, Mg++, Na+) and cations (HCO3-, Cl-, SO4--).  Based on this equivalence it is possible to calculate the bicarbonate concentration, the alkalinity and the residual alkalinity. 

Just eyeballing the analysis, your water looks pretty versatile.

9
What Martin Brungard said (not that Ive checked his calculations).  There is some confusion in this thread over the term carbonate hardness.  It is not the same as water hardness.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonate_hardness for more more info

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Transfer/bottling temperature vs oxygen
« on: April 03, 2018, 11:54:08 PM »
Here's a pro to bottling cold beer.  The cold beer holds more CO2, which is released as the beer is transferred to a warm bucket and warm bottles providing more of a blanket effect than warm beer.  I don't know if the pros or cons win ultimately.
Holds more co2 if it is still generating co2, otherwise it is holding more of whatever is in the headspace.
My comment relates to bottling the beer in its current cold state rather than bottling after warming.

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Right, but where would this extra co2 come from? If crashing, little if any co2 is produced as fermentation is done. If crashed in a keg with some head pressure your idea is gold.
It had more CO2 now than if it warms up because if the beer warms up before bottling some of the evolved CO2 will go out the airlock.

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11
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Transfer/bottling temperature vs oxygen
« on: April 03, 2018, 11:29:03 PM »
Here's a pro to bottling cold beer.  The cold beer holds more CO2, which is released as the beer is transferred to a warm bucket and warm bottles providing more of a blanket effect than warm beer.  I don't know if the pros or cons win ultimately.
Holds more co2 if it is still generating co2, otherwise it is holding more of whatever is in the headspace.
My comment relates to bottling the beer in its current cold state rather than bottling after warming.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk


12
All Grain Brewing / Re: Brewing Water Filtration
« on: April 03, 2018, 05:09:57 PM »
I fill my hot liquor tanks with cold city water the night before to let the chlorine dissipate and heat the water uncovered with no problems.  The chlorine level in my city water seems fairly low.

If your city uses chloramine then you you can't rely on dissipation.  You will have to filter or use metabisulfite or campden tablets to react out the chloramine.

13
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Transfer/bottling temperature vs oxygen
« on: April 03, 2018, 05:00:34 PM »
Here's a pro to bottling cold beer.  The cold beer holds more CO2, which is released as the beer is transferred to a warm bucket and warm bottles providing more of a blanket effect than warm beer.  I don't know if the pros or cons win ultimately.

14
Thanks for indicating that BE-134 is a diastacus variant.  I normally ferment in plastic so knowing that I need glass or steel beforehand is important.
I’ve used 3711 and belle in my plastic fermenters and never had a cross contamination.

Same
The implication being that 3711 and Belle Saison are diastacus too?

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15
Thanks for indicating that BE-134 is a diastacus variant.  I normally ferment in plastic so knowing that I need glass or steel beforehand is important.

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