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Messages - kramerog

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Final Gravity is too High
« on: December 13, 2018, 10:33:56 PM »
My efficiency is not good around 60%.

Any suggestions on what to test for to lower my FG?
Thanks,
-tim

What other folks have said are correct.  I just want to touch upon a different issue.  Low efficiency can result in more dextrins than normal which would cause high FG. 

Which leads to mash pH.  Most people (at least that's my impression) on the AHA Forum use Bru'n Water to calculate and adjust mash pH and don't measure it.

2
Other Fermentables / Re: Water profile -- valid for mead?
« on: December 10, 2018, 02:26:16 AM »
Since nobody has replied, I'll give this a crack.  Water profiles in mead don't exist in the same way as they do in beer making.  More importantly, in mead making there are often post-fermentation adjustments including  adjustments of acidity to dial in the flavor.  The focus in mead making initially (before fermentation) is to ensure that the right ions are present for a good fermentation.  To that end I would point you to https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/attachments/0000/1256/NDzym05_MasterMead.pdf and http://beerandwinejournal.com/potassium-ph-mead/

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Starters - Pitch whole, or crash & decant?
« on: December 07, 2018, 07:38:07 PM »
I do the traditional decant.  I'm going to start to add spent yeast to the boil of the starter as a source of nutrients particularly zinc rather than to the wort to take advantage of my practice of decanting.

4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast suggestion for Baltic Porter
« on: December 05, 2018, 12:26:11 AM »
I also wonder what yeast would work best for a particular style.  So, I typically go to the source:

https://www.wyeastlab.com/yeast-style/baltic-porter


There you will find a very nice selection of recommended strains right from the proverbial horses mouth.  White Labs also has good recommendations.  But their website can be a bit daunting.

A good resource!


Good suggestions, but don't take it as gospel

Case in point, I would avoid the Irish Ale as it is quite non-attenuative.

...non attenuative or simply doesn’t process maltotriose therefore leaves a higher FG?  I’ve never used it but I plan 70% for similar yeasts so I am not disappointed when I end up with a higher FG.


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Attenuation is low at 71-75.

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5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast suggestion for Baltic Porter
« on: December 04, 2018, 03:34:11 PM »
I also wonder what yeast would work best for a particular style.  So, I typically go to the source:

https://www.wyeastlab.com/yeast-style/baltic-porter


There you will find a very nice selection of recommended strains right from the proverbial horses mouth.  White Labs also has good recommendations.  But their website can be a bit daunting.

A good resource!


Good suggestions, but don't take it as gospel

Case in point, I would avoid the Irish Ale as it is quite non-attenuative.

6
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Question about nutrients in starter
« on: December 02, 2018, 06:37:40 PM »

Yeast bio-accumulate zinc in their cells, therefore another zinc source is to add yeast slurry from previous batches to the boil kettle. If I'm not mistaken, that is what the Servomyces product is. I can't see spending money on that product when I've got it on hand. One problem with this approach is the potential for the boiled yeast to contribute autolysis flavors to the beer, such as rubbery or meaty flavor. There are a couple of my local breweries that clearly have this problem. Do be careful how much slurry you use and be cognizant of any autolysis flavors that might be present in the beer.

I add a heaping tablespoon of packed yeast sediment per 10 gallon batch to the boil for bigger beers.  So far I haven't notified any autolysis flavors or other ill effects.  I can't say that I have noticed improvements but I consider it a "best practice" so I do it anyway.

7
Gordon Strong's book would be next in that it is written by a winner of Homebrewer of the Year back when people medaled in multiple catergories in the NHC.  There is just one caveat.  He has his own particular brewing philosophy which if you brew exclusively with RO water will work like a charm, but if you find part of the challenge/enjoyment of brewing is messing with water chemistry than you might not like it as much.  I'm in the latter category so I haven't read the book, but I can't argue with his results.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Kesselmaishe
« on: November 24, 2018, 12:55:17 AM »
I'm skeptical of this technique since the reason why decoction has a favorable flavor impact is that sugars and proteins are being heated in a concentrated solution.  Draining off wort and then adding sparge water results in a much more dilute "decoction."

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: [help] Stuck mead
« on: November 22, 2018, 10:28:16 PM »
I do staggered nutrient additions but I wouldn't recommend it for you at this point.  But if you have K2CO3 or KHCO3, I would add it so you add 300 mg/l of K+ to avoid getting stuck again.


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10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: [help] Stuck mead
« on: November 22, 2018, 03:22:29 AM »
Degas

11
Are you exclusively fermenting with Brett?  If so, I don't think it would matter much when you add the enyzmes. 

Are you fementing with sacch and brett?  I would wait until it primary is completely done, rack to secondary and then add the enzymes.

I would not be concerned about the alcohol tolerance of Brett unless you are truly using a wild brett.  Commercial bretts seem to have no trouble fermenting at 10% v/v alcohol.

Let us know how your experiments work out.

12
I haven't been able to follow the podcast recently, but I enjoyed this one.

13
Ingredients / Re: When to add pickling lime
« on: November 09, 2018, 12:26:45 AM »
I have water that is a little bit more "mineralized" and a higher pH and don't have any trouble dissolving pickling lime in the strike water.  Some calcium minerals I have to stir to get to dissolve and some I don't.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beer Style Guidelines?
« on: November 08, 2018, 01:33:35 AM »
DMS is dimethyl sulfide.  Pils malt has it, but it is generally not a fault in lighter color lagers,  but would be in ales. DMS is an example of something that could theoretically happen if you used pils malt as your only base malt in a stout but it is unlikely.

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15
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Pressure transfer
« on: November 07, 2018, 03:47:55 PM »
Nope.  But you could also start a siphon into keg and once siphon is going direct the CO2 exiting the keg into the bucket to achieve a nearly closed transfer.

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