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Messages - ynotbrusum

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Briess copper malt
« on: October 11, 2017, 04:08:57 AM »
Just tried it in a Czech Amber - I used 1.875 pounds in a 10.5 pound total grist for 5.5 gallons.  I wanted the color and had it on hand from a club purchase. Base Malt was Weyermann floor malted Bohemian Pilsner and the only other add was a quarter pound of acidulated for pH.

For your Red you might want to push it to a full two pounds or higher...cheers

2
There is information on the AHA website, including text of applicable statutes.  Florida reads:

Applicable Statutory Material

562.165  Production of beer or wine for personal or family use; exemption.–

(1)  Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary, a person who is not prohibited by s. 562.111 from possessing alcoholic beverages may produce beer for personal or family use, and not for sale, in the amounts provided in this section without payment of taxes or fees or without a license. The aggregate amount of such beer permitted to be produced with respect to any household shall be as follows:

(a)  Not in excess of 200 gallons per calendar year if there are two or more such persons in such household.

(b)  Not in excess of 100 gallons per calendar year if there is only one such person in such household.

(2)  Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary, a person who is not prohibited by s. 562.111 from possessing alcoholic beverages may produce wine for personal or family use, and not for sale, in the amounts provided in this section without payment of taxes or fees or without a license. The aggregate amount of such wine permitted to be produced with respect to any household shall be as follows:

(a)  Not in excess of 200 gallons per calendar year if there are two or more such persons in such household.

(b)  Not in excess of 100 gallons per calendar year if there is only one such person in such household.

(3)  Any personal or family production of beer or wine in excess of the amount permitted in this section or any sale of such alcoholic beverages constitutes a violation of the Beverage Law.

(4)  Wine and beer made under the provisions of this section may be removed from the premises where made for personal or family use, including use at organized affairs, exhibitions, or competitions, such as homemakers’ contests, tastings, or judgings. Wine or beer used under this subsection shall not be sold or offered for sale.

Note: The information presented here is to the best of our knowledge and should not be used as a substitute for legal advice specific to the laws of your state.


Note the disclaimer at the end!  Also note section 4 which allows the use of homebrew at "organized affairs, exhibitions, or competitions..." but expressly limits "Wine or beer used under this subsection shall not be sold or offered for sale".  The bidding on a prize at an auction, sure sounds like offering for sale to me.  However, the offering to allow them to brew up a batch by the successful bidder at your home might fall within the permissible guidelines, since it would ostensibly be made by the successful bidder with your oversight.  Brewing a case for another that is sold at the auction seems to be a problem as I read it.

Now my disclaimer:  I am not a licensed attorney in Florida and you should seek one out for advice before trying any of this!  Perhaps you could also check with the Florida authority for guidance....

3
Interesting to speculate, but I would brew small batches and find out for yourself.  One other thing to remember within the ale yeast spectrum is that the ale yeasts already don't metabolize some sugars that lager yeast will do (and some Brett strains will metabolize even more things).  You might also want to focus on creating or avoiding fermentability using sugar or other adjunct, for example.   

My guess is that in terms of resultant gravities from mashing at different temperatures and talking in terms of different flavor profiles without doing more, the same yeast may react differently to those worts of varying compositions (i.e., worts from different mashing temperatures alone).  The next level would be to play with arresting attenuation, once you lock into a particular yeast strain that you like to get a different flavor profile or level of body.

Again, really interesting and thought provoking discussion - even though its an old thread.  Heck, if it keeps Dave over here and not over at HBT, it is worth getting into it.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Blichmann Riptide, bummed
« on: October 09, 2017, 02:31:19 PM »
At one time they were talking about offering the head and shroud as an upgrade to existing March and Chugger pumps - I assume that is no longer the case?  It is good to see a quality manufacturer own up to an operational defect and quickly move to clear it up.  I may go with the riptide, but I have a fully operational March 809 with a stainless head that I can't see retiring as yet.  I also have the Topsflo DC pump and it squealed with boiling liquid, but I realized right away that the boiling liquid was pulling in steam from the kettle bottom, so I quit using it while boiling and run my wort through the IC whirlpool chiller once I power off the element (the Topsflo is otherwise virtually silent).  Between these two pumps, I probably will not upgrade to the Riptide, though I like the breakdown capability it presents.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Beware the Homebrew circa 1920
« on: October 08, 2017, 05:47:03 PM »
Very fun to read - but I had to look up biliousness:

Biliousness: A term used in the 18th and 19th centuries pertaining to bad digestion, stomach pains, constipation, and excessive flatulence (passing gas). The quantity or quality of the bile was thought to be at fault for the condition. Hence, the name "biliousness." ("Bilious" derives from the French "bilieux," which in turn came from "bilis," the Latin term for "bile.") Biliousness was generally laid to high living. The "cure" was moderation and frequent visits to the doctor.

I admit that I have seen the last symptom after a night of sampling homebrews, but I will accept that result on occasion.....

6
You can always plug the drain with a piece of foam stuffed into the hole that will allow air to access the interior, but limit access by fruitflies...just a thought.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash temp drop
« on: October 04, 2017, 09:31:36 AM »
Maybe the opening of the mash tun multiple times/for an extended period of time may have more to do with the temperature drop than the vessel, itself?

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash in a Bag (MIAB) Beersmith Mash Profiles?
« on: September 27, 2017, 03:18:00 PM »
I don't know the Beersmith tinkering necessary to achieve the result in advance, but as Denny always said about batch sparging is that you run off the first batch and determine how much sparge water to add based on what was collected and what is needed for the start of the boil to get where you want in terms of final volume, knowing that there will be no more than that coming out after adding the sparge water to the saturated grains.

I do a BIAB with mash recirculation and use a simple small pan lid as a mash press to squeeze out the full measure of wort from the bag after mashing.  Over the course of a few batches, I have determined that it comes down to 14-14.125 gallons of initial strike water for most of my lagers of 1044 to 1048 OG (18-20 pounds of grain) for an 11 gallon batch after boil off and cooling.

I don't boil hard anymore, however, so YMMV.

You may just want to try to do it a few times and through trial and repeat attempts to dial in your volumes with your system.  If you brew very different styles and gravities, the math might be trickier than the trial and repeat trial approach. 

Cheers!

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New to brewing, started with Mead
« on: September 27, 2017, 07:36:20 AM »
Welcome to the forum.  There is a section of the forum dedicated to "Other Fermentables", so I suggest you check that out for mead flavoring, additives and process suggestions.  There are some very experienced mead makers on the forum, so I am sure you will gain a lot of knowledge from them.  Best of luck and enjoy your mead making!

10
Ingredients / Re: Hops Glut?
« on: September 25, 2017, 03:21:34 PM »
Yes, that was a good article to see the trends occurring...I had heard about a year or two back that the Northern Brewer hop in steam beer was going by the wayside, as well, since it wasn't selling as prolifically and the plants don't put out as much volume on that strain.  The poor farmers are caught in the switches as trendy hops take so long to develop to production levels and by the time they are producing the new varieties, the fickle customers (both craft brewers and their patrons) are on to the next sensations being developed.

I have gone back to mostly lager brewing and use noble hops almost exclusively.  I hope they don't stop making them in Germany.

11
Other Fermentables / Re: "Naturally Sweet" Cider
« on: September 23, 2017, 06:14:06 PM »
Getting my apple juice this Friday and I will try the Wy1450 route.  Definitely looking forward to the residual sweetness - and I will keg it, so I am hoping for the best on this maiden voyage with cider!

12
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B availability
« on: September 19, 2017, 11:09:09 AM »
Yes, the recommended dosage allows a 50 gram pack to go pretty far at the Homebrew level.  I get by with dosing at the lower end of the recommended scale, too - .75 grams in 14 gallons of strike water and 2 grams at 16 minutes left in the boil for an 11 gallon batch (adding a tablet of whirlfloc a couple minutes later).

13
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B availability
« on: September 15, 2017, 12:21:37 PM »
Thanks, Denny - they would certainly know on the release timing.  I think that it will be well received on the homebrew level, based on the results experienced by those of us who procured it from down under previously and have been using it regularly.  Just wondering what kind of cost to expect....  Also, I wonder if their other products, such as Tanal O2 ("suspension maintaining" additive) will come out for homebrewers at some point in the future.

14
Ingredients / Re: Hop Extract & 30 Minute Boils
« on: September 15, 2017, 12:10:48 PM »
The only time I have used hop extract were at annual Club brews at a local brewery, where we wanted easy and identical batches to compare single hop flavoring/late hop/whirlpool and dry hop additions which differed from brewer to brewer as the "only" variable (using the brewery's wort and house yeast by all of us).  Different fermenting temperatures may have occurred, but it was in the spring, so we were all fermenting in our basements at reasonably similar temperatures.  It was really interesting to compare the hops this way.  I don't think I would use up a syringe of the hop extract we had before it would expire in terms of best use date.

By the way, the consensus favorite hop for flavor for our APA was Southern Cross (Mittlefruh and a couple other similar hops were up there, though).

15
Ingredients / Re: Brewtan B availability
« on: September 15, 2017, 12:00:48 PM »
Joe Formanek gave a presentation last night to our Homebrew Club on the subject and he said Brewcraft has the product and is in the process of packaging, so it should be available through anybody that handles Brewcraft - if not immediately, then within days.  Of course, he had 50 g samples for us, so my stash is restored for the time being.  ;D

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