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Messages - hoser

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Presenting…
The First Annual Sower’s Cup Homebrew Competition
Hosted by the Lincoln Lagers Homebrew Club of Lincoln, Nebraska
Saturday, September 13, 2014
Part of the High Plains Brewer of the Year Circuit

BJCP Registered Competition
Open to U.S. Residents 21 years of age or older

Online Registration Portal:
Registration will open on July 21, 2014
Beer Entries, Judges, and Stewards will all register through our BCOE&M Portal, located at the URL below:
http://www.lincolnlagers.com/cup/

Banquet Dinner:
Please stay tuned for more information on our awards banquet and special guest speaker.

Event Details
Date: Saturday, Sep 13
Event Type: AHA/BJCP Competition
Contact: Jason McLaughlin
Lincoln, NE
Entry Fee: $7.00
Entry Deadline: 08/29/2014
Competition Date: 09/13/2014

More information is coming soon! Please stay tuned!

Twitter Feed: https://twitter.com/TheSowersCup
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheSowersCup?ref_type=bookmark

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: IPA: Beer style or marketing term?
« on: June 10, 2014, 12:28:11 PM »
A hoppy porter and a black IPA are not the same thing.  There should be little to know roast character in a black IPA with medium high to high hop aroma and flavor.  Whereas, a porter is defined by dominant malt character and roast character in flavor and a aroma.  The bittering can be high, but hop flavor should be medium but not dominate the malt character which is different than an black IPA. Also, a porter should be balanced towards the malt whereas a black IPA by it's very nature as an "IPA" is not.

There no generally-accepted standard for what is and what is not a black IPA at this point in time.  I have tasted black IPAs that taste like highly-hopped strong porters as well as black IPAs that taste like colored IPAs.

I beg to differ:

From the BA guidelines, it may not be BJCP, but I expect/suspect that they will be included in some way shape or form when the new guidelines are released very soon:
American-Style Black Ale
American-Style Black Ales are very dark to black. Medium caramel malt and dark roasted malt aromas are
evident. Hop aroma is medium-high to high, with fruity, floral, herbal or other hop aroma from hops of all origins
contributing. Medium caramel malt and dark roasted malt flavors are evident. High astringency and high degree of
burnt roast malt should be absent. Hop flavor is medium-high, with fruity, floral, herbal or other hop flavor from
hops of all origins contributing. Hop bitterness is medium-high to high. Body is medium.
Original Gravity (ºPlato) 1.056 - 1.075 (13.8 - 18.2) ● Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (ºPlato) 1.012 - 1.018
(3.1 - 4.6) ● Alcohol by Weight (Volume) 5.00% - 6.00% (6.30% - 7.60%) ● Bitterness (IBU) (50 - 70) ● Color
SRM (EBC) 35+ (70+)

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: IPA: Beer style or marketing term?
« on: June 10, 2014, 11:05:31 AM »
The ingredients and proportions also used in both styles are inherently different.

I prefer to look at the styles as "labels" so that I know exactly what kind of hoppy beer I will be getting. 

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: IPA: Beer style or marketing term?
« on: June 10, 2014, 10:58:07 AM »
Black IPA makes no sense to me whatsoever. The beer is basically a hoppy Porter.  Belgian IPA is another style that I find to have a poorly-chosen name.

With that said, I agree that appending "IPA" to beer styles that having nothing to do with IPA appears to be a marketing gimmick just like "Amber" was the marketing gimmick of the nineties. The craft beer market is much more of "me too" market than craft brewers are willing to admit.

A hoppy porter and a black IPA are not the same thing.  There should be little to know roast character in a black IPA with medium high to high hop aroma and flavor.  Whereas, a porter is defined by dominant malt character and roast character in flavor and a aroma.  The bittering can be high, but hop flavor should be medium but not dominate the malt character which is different than an black IPA. Also, a porter should be balanced towards the malt whereas a black IPA by it's very nature as an "IPA" is not.

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Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: 10 Barrel American Radler SWILL
« on: June 04, 2014, 10:14:53 AM »
Here, found that Oregon sour beer for you..

http://www.cascadebrewingbarrelhouse.com/


Agree with all of the other previous posters.

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Ingredients / Re: Bravo, El Dorado
« on: May 23, 2014, 08:15:47 AM »
I have not personally used Bravo, but a local brewery had a single hop beer competition last year.  Bravo was one of the choices.  While some to the characteristics were surprising, it was rather boring.  Good clean, smooth bitterness, slight to moderate pithy citrus, low pine/spice. It was better than calypso, but paled next to simcoe which were the other 2 options.

If those we my 2 options, I would go with El Dorado.  More of the new hop aromatics people are looking for.

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Am I being to anal?
« on: May 18, 2014, 07:32:25 PM »
If you really want to be anal, wort after fermentation is called "beer."  :P

All that being said.  Don't worry about the star san and limit the 02 and you'll be fine.

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The Pub / Re: Help name some barrels
« on: May 16, 2014, 08:23:52 AM »
Get 3 more and name them after the seven dwarfs ;D

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Kolsch: Lager on or off yeast?
« on: April 04, 2014, 10:05:08 AM »
Thanks for all the help.  Started chilling it down last night.  Will plan on lagering on the yeast and transfer over next weekend.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: White Labs 070 bourbon yeast
« on: April 02, 2014, 11:25:37 AM »
I am considering using it in a Kentucky Common, but have yet to do it.

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Yeast and Fermentation / Kolsch: Lager on or off yeast?
« on: April 01, 2014, 07:39:28 PM »
So there was a thread a while back that talked about that, "German Lager flavor."

I have a Kolsch going with ECY 21 Kolsch yeast at 60F.  I am about 10+ days into fermentation. Just curious what everyones thoughts are about lagering.  On or off the yeast?  The consensus was on the yeast for a month for the lagers.  Just curious what the thoughts are on a delicate light hybrid like a kolsch?  Does it matter? Thanks!

Brian

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Consensus while judging?
« on: March 31, 2014, 12:00:00 PM »
An important thing is to make sure that beers that might be good enough to push, get their chance to shine in another forum. When you have large contests with multiple flights, there is a greater chance that other palates will have the opportunity to judge it. The beers in question, just need the opportunity!

This is really the most important thing. Ensuring that a medal-worthy beer gets a chance at medaling is more important than worrying about scores.

Usually, if the guy I'm judging with cannot see eye-to-eye with me, I will come down on score with the caveat that the beer will be pushed to mini-BOS. I explain to them that the worst case for that situation is that if the beer is really as bad as they say it is (e.g. a 29 for 'subdued hop aroma' in an APA), then the beer will be kicked immediately. No harm, no foul. But if the beer was as good as I think it is, it should place in mini-BOS. I'm usually correct in pushing the "questionable" beer to mini-BOS (in that they usually medal at that point), but I've been wrong before and seen a beer I fought for get kicked quickly. Better to err on the safe side though!

Agree completely with Martin and Amanda! I tend to error on the side of caution if I am not sure.  Had a somewhat similar situation this weekend.  Thought we had a beer that was pretty good so I figured I would give it a chance in many BOS so that a few other palates could taste the beer and decide it's fate.  It placed in the top 3 and will advance to Nationals. 

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Beer Recipes / Re: Coconut porter recipe?
« on: March 26, 2014, 01:24:10 PM »
I wouldn't use coconut in the primary.  No way for you to control the flavor impact.  I generally add toasted coconut to the secondary in my 5-0 Hawaiian Porter.  It also has cacao nibs and Hawaiian coffee in it.  Not sure if that is a deal breaker for you?  I would be happy to share the recipe.

Not a deal breaker -- I haven't used a secondary in several years but I certainly could. I like the additions (I do stouts with cocoa-coffee). Would love the recipe.

Matter of semantics.  I should have been more specific.  I place all the ingredients in the keg, that way I can taste the flavor development.  Generally I save some of the initial beer to blend back in because I usually lose a half gallon or so of beer from all the ingredients.

5-0 Hawaiian Porter

6 gallons post boil
60 min boil
1.064 OG
Mash 154F

70% 2-Row
12% Munich
8%  C-60L
6% Chocolate Malt
4%  Carafa III

38 IBUs 60 min
14g Williamette/5 IBUs @ 30min

Ale yeast ( I prefer WLP007 but have brewed with chico before)
* I use the coffee and cacao nibs to develop some of the natural porter character so that it is not over the top roasty.  Never done a normal robust porter with this recipe, but would work.  Maybe dial back the cacao nibs and coffee if so?

In keg/secondary
6 oz Cacao nibs
24 oz Coconut flakes ( can be divided or added all at once, I have done both)
1.5-2 oz coffee of choice, dry beaned.  I use Kona
1 vanilla bean (rounds out the flavors)

Also, 16 fluid oz. of cold steeped coffee.

I systematically pull the additions when they are the flavor profile I prefer.  Coffee and vanilla generally 4 days.  Cacao nibs are usually 4-7 days.  I find the coconut is the most variable ingredient.  Did this recipe 3 weeks ago.  Added all 24oz of coconut due to time limitations.  Pulled the coconut after 4.5 days. The initial recipe was 16oz x 2 wks.  Then another 8oz. for a week.

Cacao nibs and coconut were toasted in the oven.  House smells fantastic when this happens!  Good luck!  Let us know how it turns out!

This recipe in the 3 comps I have entered has finished no worse than 3rd place BOS.  Winning twice.  Goes over well at festivals also.


i've got a total newbie question on this recipe since i'm, well, a newbie.  it says 38 ibu 60 min but it doesn't say what kind of hop or how much for the 60 minute addition.
is the 14g of williamette going to give you enough total bitterness.  14g is only .5 oz.  which is half a package of hops.
for the 38 ibu aren't you going to need something else?

Thanks for the help!

in this case because you don't care about anything but bitterness the type of hop doesn't really matter, you want a high alpha, neutral hop.

how to calculate IBUs is covered here pretty well
http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter5-5.html

but honestly I would use software or online calculators but I'm lazy.

so no, the Willamette is not going to give you 38 IBU it is going to give you ~5 IBU when Added at 30 minutes. as indicated in the recipe.

Get some magnum or bravo or something similarly high alpha% for the bittering charge so you don't need to use very much.

Bingo! ;)

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Beer Recipes / Re: Coconut porter recipe?
« on: March 26, 2014, 01:23:31 PM »
Add it to the secondary and then bottle or transfer to keg when you get the taste you want. You could add the coconut in a bag. Boil only the bag to sanitize it, add your coconut put it in the secondary and fish it out when it tastes how you want it.
This^^^

Word of caution, it's a PIA pulling out that much coconut thru that little hole in the keg.  Easier transfer off to a second keg and then remove the coconut from the empty keg.

It's a lot of work, but it's worth it in the end.


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Beer Recipes / Re: Single hop saison idea
« on: March 21, 2014, 10:02:46 AM »
I'd also ditch the crystal malts.  All pilsner base, 5-10% munich or vienna, 5-10% wheat or rye.  Mash low for fermentabilty.  You want saisons to be dry and quaffable.  The yeast and the carbonation will take care of the body (as well the rye or wheat).

Funkwerks saison is a single hop beer, opal.  It is a frequent medal winner at GABF.  I just brewed the clone recipe from Denny's new book.

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